hena_h
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#1
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What is better a PGCE or the Teach First Scheme? Im more interested in the Teach First scheme- does this look better or worse when applying for teaching?

Also if after Teach First I decide to go into business, and then start teaching, does this look bad?

Alot of questions here, answers to any will be much appreciated

Thanks
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brak3n
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They're totally different tbh, and I would say you should choose depending on what you actually want to do is life. Do you want to go into business? Or do you want to teach?

I would say Teach First looks better than PGCE if anything, as I suspect it's harder to get on the Teach First scheme and more challenging to complete. You're placed in difficult schools and thrown in the deep-end. And due to that, if you don't actually plan to go into business, you may as well do the 'easier' PGCE route.

If you do Teach First, then go into business, and then start teaching, you're switching back and forth quite a bit. I can't see that being very good for establishing a career. If you do Teach First and find you like teaching then stick with it, if not try going into business. I don't see why you'd want to keep switching.
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hena_h
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(Original post by brak3n)
They're totally different tbh, and I would say you should choose depending on what you actually want to do is life. Do you want to go into business? Or do you want to teach?

I would say Teach First looks better than PGCE if anything, as I suspect it's harder to get on the Teach First scheme and more challenging to complete. You're placed in difficult schools and thrown in the deep-end. And due to that, if you don't actually plan to go into business, you may as well do the 'easier' PGCE route.

If you do Teach First, then go into business, and then start teaching, you're switching back and forth quite a bit. I can't see that being very good for establishing a career. If you do Teach First and find you like teaching then stick with it, if not try going into business. I don't see why you'd want to keep switching.
Thanks for the advice
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blue_shift86
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on this note does the teach first program lead to a full, proper PGCE? I'm a bit confused between all the various routes into teaching
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mypsuedonym
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Why would you want to go through the effort of completing a PGCE or the TeachFirst programme if you do not intend to teach at the end of it?

That seems like a lot of work and stress to put yourself through if you don't want to teach.

As far as I'm aware (though I could be wrong) you are not awarded a PGCE academic qualification through teach first. You will however gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

With the PGCE you get the academic qualification and QTS.


QTS entitles you to work for any maintained school in the United Kingdom.


The reason I chose PGCE over the TeachFirst route is because I will gain masters credits which I can use if I wish to continue to masters level. Having the academic qualification also means that I have to potential to work overseas. QTS alone is not usually enough for that.


I hope this helps somewhat.


---------------------------------------------------------------------
I am starting an ICT PGCE at the IOE September 2011
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mrskill121
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You are awarded a PGCE as part of the Teach first program, and in fact you can stay on an complete a masters in Educational leadership (depending on region)!

I personally choose teach first because of the mission to deal with educational disadvantage but also because you are straight into schools with your own classes, rather then waiting a year acting as a tempory teacher on 6 week placements!
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mypsuedonym
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Oh that's good that you get the PGCE through the TeachFirst program.

I chose the PGCE route as I want to have a choice as to which schools i apply for once I am qualified. As I understand it, the teach first thing is all about placing you in challenging schools.

Also...2 years is a long time to commit to something. I'll have my PGCE in a year.

I also couldn't commit to the flexibility that teach first requires. They ask that you be flexible when it comes to where you are placed - it could be anywhere from london to yorkshire. I need and want to remain in london...so I didn't want to apply for something I would potentially have to decline if they wanted to move me to yorkshire.

With my PGCE i got to apply to the university of my choice and I will be able to apply to schools that i want to teach in which I feel i'm a fit for and which are a fit for me.

Good luck everyone.
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Missy_k4
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Not to confuse you even more, but taking the GTP route, is also a good way of becoming a teacher. You are supported in school, where majority of your training takes places. It's worth looking into. I am the middle of applying, the school offered to fund my training, this way I will be getting paid and my fees are covered too. The pay isn’t the same as a teacher, but it's better than nothing. Have a look on the TDA website it's a good place to start your research, gain extra info.


Just wondering mypsuedonym, how are you getting on with the pgce?

Good look everyone...
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mypsuedonym
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(Original post by Missy_k4)
Just wondering mypsuedonym, how are you getting on with the pgce?
I haven't done my PGCE yet... have an unconditional offer for IOE to begin this September.
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BeatriceF
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(Original post by mypsuedonym)
Oh that's good that you get the PGCE through the TeachFirst program.
You dont 'get PGCE' through teach First, you get Qualified Teacher Status.

After a PGCE you get a certificate saying that you have done a teaching course that leads to obtaining a QTS at the end of it. So if you pass your PGCE successfully you will be also awarded the QTS.

PGCE is better if you consider teaching abroad as other countries recognise it as a teaching qualification.

If you just train at schools (doing GTP- Graduate Teacher Programme) you get plenty of experience but you wont be qualified to teach outside the UK.

You can also look at this helpful summary:

http://www.teacherstalk.co.uk/faq/te...o-teaching.php

Hope that helps!
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modgepodge
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Just the opinion of a PGCE student here....I know a lot of people love GTP and Teachfirst cos you're in the classroom straight away. However, this is a downside IMO. How can you teach children properly if you do not know anything about pedagogy, how children learn? Plus my course puts a lot of effort in to teaching us subject knowledge which is good if you're a bit rusty and want to teach higher up in the primary, or secondary age range. They also give us a lot of ideas for good ways to teach certain things. Obviously, the placements are where you really work on the teaching, but for me, the input from the university was incredibly valuable and I wouldn't have been without it.

One of the teachers I worked with on placement was GTP and in his 3rd year of teaching. IMO, you could tell he'd done GTP. He was a good teacher, but he was quite "lecture-y" - just talked to the kids (Y6) and didnt do many fun activities. From chatting to him I did get the impression I understood a lot more than him about how children learn.
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minnieuk
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(Original post by BeatriceF)
You dont 'get PGCE' through teach First, you get Qualified Teacher Status.
Yes, you do get a PGCE through Teach First. I was at one of their seminars last week and this was asked and confirmed. You get a PGCE at the end of year 1 and can go on to do the Masters in either Education or Leadership in year 2. It's also confirmed quite clearly on their website:
http://graduates.teachfirst.org.uk/o...-training.html
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1jag
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(Original post by brak3n)
They're totally different tbh, and I would say you should choose depending on what you actually want to do is life. Do you want to go into business? Or do you want to teach?

I would say Teach First looks better than PGCE if anything, as I suspect it's harder to get on the Teach First scheme and more challenging to complete. You're placed in difficult schools and thrown in the deep-end. And due to that, if you don't actually plan to go into business, you may as well do the 'easier' PGCE route.

If you do Teach First, then go into business, and then start teaching, you're switching back and forth quite a bit. I can't see that being very good for establishing a career. If you do Teach First and find you like teaching then stick with it, if not try going into business. I don't see why you'd want to keep switching.

How can you say that PGCE is the easier route? PGCE is the academic route and is by no means easier. It is recognised worldwide, whereas Teach First isn't.
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Shelly_x
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(Original post by 1jag)
How can you say that PGCE is the easier route? PGCE is the academic route and is by no means easier. It is recognised worldwide, whereas Teach First isn't.
This thread is two years old. Please refrain from bumping old threads.
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SMITHJANE
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Teach First you get PGCE so obviously it's also recognised worldwide?! The only difference is that you have to teach at the same time
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LovePeaceAwesome
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I don't really know about education and teaching and PGCE or Teach First, but some of the best, most amazing teachers that I had all did Teach First
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dokeeffe
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I'm biased as a PGCE grad but I have a couple of issues with teach first.

1) You should not be in the most difficult schools with the most challenging children available. It won't help you to become a better teacher and they need and deserve more experienced, qualified teachers.

2) I don't see how you could retain the information from a 6 week block of pedagogy and apply it over 2 years. You need to learn about behaviour management, AFL, differentiation etc gradually.

3) You should be observed in ALL of your lessons and receive feedback for each during the first year. That almost seems like a safeguarding issue to me.

4) If you're phys/chem/comp/math you're missing out on the (pretty generous) grant. I got 25 grand tax free.
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