State school pupils opt for easy A-levels Watch

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Kittennffc
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#281
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#281
Yeah.

Private = fee paying school
Public = non-fee paying school
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Madelyn)
Having disruptive pupils may well detract from your exam results, but marks *shock horror* aren't everything. And them being there makes you into a better person, I think. And I should know, I deal with fights in the lower school on a regular basis. The first time I had to intervene was harder than any exam I've ever been in.

Zakatu - so you think pupils should be beaten into obedience? You know, the third reich was based on people being obedient. Seriously though, corporal punishment is stupid and wrong. You would never (I sincerely hope) do that to another adult, so why do it to a child? The way to gain respect is to treat them with respect. Beating them will only breed resentment (cf. Lindsay Anderson's brilliant film "If....", or generations of my family).
And one of the problems exceptionally clever kids have is that all their lives they've been able to do everything. So the first time that they are truly challenged, they just give up. They can't cope with it. Having to deal with things, to overcome obstacles all your life not only equips you better to cope with them, but also makes you truly value the results. Perfect, brilliantly-equipped schools are not the answer. Offering equal opportunities to everyone is.
I fully agree with everyting you have written in this post.
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
Yeah.

Private = fee paying school
Public = non-fee paying school

public are fee paying (or taking) schools, as well as private.

My grammar is not, it is a state school
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
Oh rite, well I wanted to get the facts before i started this...

From your post it seems like you have a bit of a clouded view of what public schools are really like. you seemed to be making out that all of them were inner city scum holes not worth being there.

This is completely untrue. I went to a public school and it was not in the city, and did not have classes with thirty-plus people with poor resources. Yes, it did have desruptive pupils who did not want to be there but what school doesn't? There was probably a 90% majority of people who did want to be there and made the most of it.

So why don't you stop slating all public schools like they aren't worthy of their foundations
I think you are refering to state schools here. On a previous post you will see I, on a scale of 1 to 10, I suggested that state might occupy the area from 1 to 8, and public 7 to 10.

Hardly blind to the good states out there.
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Kittennffc
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I stated what i meant by public/private, so that is simply what they are refered to where i come from.

Whats make a grammar school different from a 'state' school? Is it purely because you have to take an entry exam?
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
I stated what i meant by public/private, so that is simply what they are refered to where i come from.

Whats make a grammar school different from a 'state' school? Is it purely because you have to take an entry exam?
grammars are state schools, state funded.

An entrance exam, the 11+ makes them selective. Entry is purely down to ability to pass the 11+, background, wealth, position has no influence (outside socio thingies mentioned earlier)
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Kittennffc
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Yeah i know that grammar schools are stated funded so you can stop patronising me. That wasn't the issue, it was the fact that you were condemning comprehensive schools.
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MrsJones
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The confusing "public" tag I believe arose from the progression of education.

First there was none

Then there was privat education where the moneyed employed tutors to teach their offspring, often living with the family together with butlers etc.

This was expensive, so the well off types pooled together to build schools so that by employing one tutor, many children could be taught. In effect a school open to the public, provided they could pay

Then came state, education for all free at point of delivery.

Maybe wrong, if it is it's still an easy way of remembering what's what.
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
Yeah i know that grammar schools are stated funded so you can stop patronising me. That wasn't the issue, it was the fact that you were condemning comprehensive schools.
The closest to that was describing how harder it is to realise potential being educated at a state comp than at a public school.

You disagree?
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Kittennffc
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Do you think im stupid or something?

I know all this so stop trying to act all clever.

Fee paying schools where i come from are refered to as private, whereas schools available to the public without paying any sort of fee are refered to as public schools.

Does that make it a little bit clearer why i was refering to them as public and private?!
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Madelyn
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#291
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Kids, don't argue. Can we call fee-paying schools 'private' and state-funded, non fee-paying school 'state', simply for the sake of clarity? Would that be so hard?
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Kittennffc
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No, i don't agree with that.

Why is it harder to realise potential if someone goes to a comprehensive school?
Almost all of the pupils in my sixth form went onto university (a number of them Oxbridge, Durham etc), and the small few who didn't have had gap years and are going to university this coming september. Surely this proves that the potential of the students at my sixth form was recognised.

Can you explain to me why it is harder for the potential of comprehensive school pupils to be recognised?
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Madelyn
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It's a generalisation. Private schools generally have greater access to resources and fewer disruptive pupils, whereas state schools (especially liberal, non-selective ones) tend to be poorer and have to retain the disruptive pupils, so students can have their education disrupted and don't get the same resources (textbooks, computers, equipment, extra-curricular stuff, extra revision sessions...), so can't always achieve what they would have done had they gone to a private school. Of course this is not always the case, but it seems to be the case for the majority of schools. This is why a smaller proportion of state school pupils get into top universities.
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
No, i don't agree with that.

Why is it harder to realise potential if someone goes to a comprehensive school?
Almost all of the pupils in my sixth form went onto university (a number of them Oxbridge, Durham etc), and the small few who didn't have had gap years and are going to university this coming september. Surely this proves that the potential of the students at my sixth form was recognised.

Can you explain to me why it is harder for the potential of comprehensive school pupils to be recognised?
It's not that it's not recognised, it's that it's harder to fufil.

If somone left a sixth form college with an a and two bs, I think that same student could have left public school with 3as.

My main point is how important it is that unis recognise this, and consider the achievements equal. Look back on my posts about this in this thread and othersand you will see it to be what I believe.

This is because it is easier, with fewer disruptive students, teachers attracted to the public school industry, smaller classes to get better exam results.

Put bluntly, your child. Would you expect him to get better exam results if he went to a public school, or a state comp?
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Kittennffc
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Thank-you. I completely agree with that point of view; the fact that it is a generalisation.

My comprehensive is one of the toughest to get into, simply because it has such a good reputation, excellent resources, and great teachers.

I think MrsJones needs to realise that whilst some comprehensive schools don't do that well and get tarred with a bad brush but some (mine included) are excellent and couldn't have done a better job than a private school.

But to clarify, i don't have anything against private schools, a number of my friends go to one of the best private schools in the country and i know how well they've done out of it, and i know for a fact that if my parents could have sent me to a private school they would have, but it doesnt mean that comprehensive schools are something to be ashamed of.
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Kittennffc
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Thats complete rubbish!

A friend of mine went to a private school, and left with ABB and is now at Leeds reading law.

A friend of mine who went to comprehensive school left with AAAA and is now at Cambridge reading theology.

What have you got to say about that?!
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
Thank-you. I completely agree with that point of view; the fact that it is a generalisation.

My comprehensive is one of the toughest to get into, simply because it has such a good reputation, excellent resources, and great teachers.

I think MrsJones needs to realise that whilst some comprehensive schools don't do that well and get tarred with a bad brush but some (mine included) are excellent and couldn't have done a better job than a private school.

But to clarify, i don't have anything against private schools, a number of my friends go to one of the best private schools in the country and i know how well they've done out of it, and i know for a fact that if my parents could have sent me to a private school they would have, but it doesnt mean that comprehensive schools are something to be ashamed of.
So it is a pseudo selective you go to, a grammar less the 11+.
I expect with my lack of posh friends my knowledge of the average, and below average comps is far more extensive than yours.

Bit like saying hurrah for my Rover, only to find a BMW underneath.
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
Thats complete rubbish!

A friend of mine went to a private school, and left with ABB and is now at Leeds reading law.

A friend of mine who went to comprehensive school left with AAAA and is now at Cambridge reading theology.

What have you got to say about that?!
Different people will attain different levels. We're not all the same you know.
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Kittennffc
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This is a stupid pointless arguement, and i doubt that either of us is going to change our ideas of comprehensive and private schools so lets just agree to disagree and leave it at that.
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MrsJones
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(Original post by Kittennffc)
This is a stupid pointless arguement, and i doubt that either of us is going to change our ideas of comprehensive and private schools so lets just agree to disagree and leave it at that.
Just one question. I think you seem to think the school attended makes no difference to exam results, for any particular student, that someone will get the same results irrespective of where educated.

I don't want a pointless arguement, but am i correct in stating this?
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