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State school pupils opt for easy A-levels watch

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    (Original post by MrsJones)
    Just one question. I think you seem to think the school attended makes no difference to exam results, for any particular student, that someone will get the same results irrespective of where educated.
    That probably is true in a lot of cases.

    Some people do well from having intensive teaching- but not many private schools really offer that. Most special attention in private schools goes to making sure everyone gets 5/6 Cs, not A*s at GCSE.

    And looking at a top private school such as Eton is also deceptive.....

    It is one of the most academic schools in the country and horrifically selective (although, yes, there are a very small minority who get in due to connections). That is why it gets such good results.

    Personally- even though I have gone to private schools all my life, the easiest way for me to learn has been to do it myself. Determination seems to be very important, perhaps even more so than intelligence in many cases.

    The mark of the intelligent student is perhaps also the ability to ignore disruptions.

    Regardless- generalisations are a detestable way to determine university admissions. Any discrimination can only be made based on the real facts and anyone wanting to be given special treatment should be able to prove they deserve it.
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    (Original post by Trier)
    That probably is true in a lot of cases.

    Some people do well from having intensive teaching- but not many private schools really offer that. Most special attention in private schools goes to making sure everyone gets 5/6 Cs, not A*s at GCSE.

    And looking at a top private school such as Eton is also deceptive.....

    It is one of the most academic schools in the country and horrifically selective (although, yes, there are a very small minority who get in due to connections). That is why it gets such good results.

    Personally- even though I have gone to private schools all my life, the easiest way for me to learn has been to do it myself. Determination seems to be very important, perhaps even more so than intelligence in many cases.

    The mark of the intelligent student is perhaps also the ability to ignore disruptions.

    Regardless- generalisations are a detestable way to determine university admissions. Any discrimination can only be made based on the real facts and anyone wanting to be given special treatment should be able to prove they deserve it.
    So if that's the case, why doesn't the output of all schools mirror average trends. And the "value added" performance of any school is non existant.
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    (Original post by MrsJones)
    So if that's the case, why doesn't the output of all schools mirror average trends. And the "value added" performance of any school is non existant.
    Because all schools don't admit the average person.

    And, different schools cater to different talents.

    The whole problem with the state/private discrimination is this; if a pupil who could have got AAA at a bad state school but got it at a top private school, should they be discriminated against if they are up against someone from a state school who got AAA.

    Your system can not take that into account and so is useless in determining real intelligence or finding the best qualified applicants.
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    Do the pirvate schools offer media studies etc? From what little I know I don;t think they do, so of course if these subjects aren't offered by the private schools then their pupils can't take them :p:
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    (Original post by twiga)
    Do the pirvate schools offer media studies etc? From what little I know I don;t think they do, so of course if these subjects aren't offered by the private schools then their pupils can't take them :p:
    Probably not - but that would be because there aren't that many media studies teachers, and it would be a bit pointless to employ 2 staff just to teach an A level that isn't even in that high demand.
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    Just a quick note.....
    English Literature IS the hardest AS level, and the most intellectually stimulating!
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    (Original post by che_guevara)
    Just a quick note.....
    English Literature IS the hardest AS level, and the most intellectually stimulating!
    Try chemistry :p: :rolleyes:
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    English lit is the hardest A level????? Try taking further maths!
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    Eng Lit's my easy subject!
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    (Original post by Madelyn)
    Eng Lit's my easy subject!
    Could that be because you have a passion for the subject?
    (An outmoded concept, I know).
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    I've said it many times before, and I'll say it again; different subjects test different skills, different people are good at different things and different people like different things. Therefore you can't make blanket generalisations such as 'chemistry is harder than English lit' or 'English lit is harder than further maths'. Some people like analysing texts, writing essays etc and so their strengths lie in arts subjects like English lit. However, others are more logical and work best with numbers, so their strengths lie in maths and the sciences. Which subjects are harder varies from person to person according to what they enjoy and what skills they have.
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    What do you study in media studies?
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    (Original post by Kernel)
    What do you study in media studies?
    I don't know about A-level, but for GCSE, we did a coursework essay on the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers and we had to make our own magazine. One of our exams involved watching an extract from a film and then answering questions on the techniques, ie lighting and sound effects, used to make it. The other exam was on advertising and how it has changed (30-mark essay question).
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    ^^that sounds like the sort of thing also covered by English (language, I believe, but we never really separated lang from lit at GCSE) and Expressive Arts. Interesting...
    You don't necessarily find subjects easier just because you have a passion for them. I adore all my subjects wildly (well, most of the time...) but still get a range of grades.
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    (Original post by kellywood_5)
    I don't know about A-level, but for GCSE, we did a coursework essay on the differences between tabloid and broadsheet newspapers and we had to make our own magazine. One of our exams involved watching an extract from a film and then answering questions on the techniques, ie lighting and sound effects, used to make it. The other exam was on advertising and how it has changed (30-mark essay question).
    This will vary from exam board to exam board but for me this was what we did at A level:

    AS is about the construction of texts, basic understanding of how audiences can be affected by texts (audience theory - e.g. does watching tarantino films make you for violent).

    Then A2 is much more about the way in which texts convey ideological meanings and how they can be used to influnce public opinion - A lot of Murdoch covered here!
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    (Original post by Jump)
    This will vary from exam board to exam board but for me this was what we did at A level:

    AS is about the construction of texts, basic understanding of how audiences can be affected by texts (audience theory - e.g. does watching tarantino films make you for violent).

    Then A2 is much more about the way in which texts convey ideological meanings and how they can be used to influnce public opinion - A lot of Murdoch covered here!
    That sounds really interesting.
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    (Original post by Trier)
    That probably is true in a lot of cases.

    Some people do well from having intensive teaching- but not many private schools really offer that. Most special attention in private schools goes to making sure everyone gets 5/6 Cs, not A*s at GCSE.

    And looking at a top private school such as Eton is also deceptive.....

    It is one of the most academic schools in the country and horrifically selective (although, yes, there are a very small minority who get in due to connections). That is why it gets such good results.

    Personally- even though I have gone to private schools all my life, the easiest way for me to learn has been to do it myself. Determination seems to be very important, perhaps even more so than intelligence in many cases.

    The mark of the intelligent student is perhaps also the ability to ignore disruptions.

    Regardless- generalisations are a detestable way to determine university admissions. Any discrimination can only be made based on the real facts and anyone wanting to be given special treatment should be able to prove they deserve it.
    What you say is very true. University should let in qulified canaidates in but just because the student dose not all A's or any A's at all.
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    u cant really compare a-levels, because each subject's different....however, i have heard from someone who did media studies, latin, history and english lit. that media studies was probs the easiest out of the four...tbh, you don't need a qualification in media studies to work in the media....you DO need a qualification in sciences (esp. biology) to become a doctor....
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    (Original post by ZsaZsa)
    u cant really compare a-levels, because each subject's different....however, i have heard from someone who did media studies, latin, history and english lit. that media studies was probs the easiest out of the four...tbh, you don't need a qualification in media studies to work in the media....you DO need a qualification in sciences (esp. biology) to become a doctor....
    It all comes down to personal preferences. If you enjoyed media at GCSE and did well then it makes sense to carry on at a-level if you know you can do well.
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    ok so now Ive been persuaded that i was wrong and perhaps i should try for the Oxbridge uni instead of dissing all the posh people there (apologies to anyone offended by my earlier posts ), do they do things like media studies degrees there or should i go for the maths or latin or sciences?
 
 
 

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