UCL and LSE Offers in Law [M100] Watch

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nevlaw
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#21
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#21
Lawz how was applying for the BCL and the program itself...I'm trying not to get too far ahead of myself, but a colleague of mine here did the BCL as well and has nothing but good to say about it.
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nevlaw
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#22
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#22
I wouldnt agree that simply because UCL uses another metric - the LNAT that makes them any better...What happened the years before the LNAT was introduced???
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Phonicsdude
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#23
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#23
No, no!

It's just Mike went, in effect, "No LSE for me, too many Int Studs".
Your comeback, as if the original comment had been spiteful, was "Well UCL has Int Studs too!".

It was just a curiosity!

(Incidentally: You could at least have told him you were washing your hair or something! :p: :p: :rofl: )
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Xanthe
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#24
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#24
Laughing at your own joke, Paul? :p:
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Phonicsdude
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Xanthe)
Laughing at your own joke, Paul? :p:
:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

maybe!
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Xanthe
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#26
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#26
Joker...
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Onearmedbandit
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Xanthe)
I'm not really an internet kinda person to be honest with you. I only know the basics, all these instant messenger thingys just confuse me. I'm still deciphering how to use AOL Instant Messenger, AOL chat rooms etc

PS: There are lots of foreign students at UCL too, even in their Law dept :p:
Yeah but not the majority!
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Phonicsdude
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#28
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#28
to be accepted they have to be able to speak, read and write english to a very high level. What difference, apart from in appearance, would it make if there were lots of Int Studs?
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Onearmedbandit
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#29
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#29
(Original post by nevlaw)
I wouldnt agree that simply because UCL uses another metric - the LNAT that makes them any better...What happened the years before the LNAT was introduced???
I never said that. I said that their using the LNAT was a reason for me to apply to them. Maybe I should elaborate:

My GCSE's are not very good in comparison with most people applying to the top law schools. I figured that my best way to combat this was to take the LNAT and just hope that I did well enough to make up for under par GCSEs, which evidently I did.

I never said it makes UCL better, but I would almost certainly have gotten rejected by LSE based on GCSE's (same thing happened at manchester and probably bristol!).


Also, I never meant to give off the impression that I don't like international students. Of course I do! But I don't really think I'd want to be in a university where most of the students are foreign (unless I went to another country obviously :p: ).
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Onearmedbandit
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#30
(Original post by Phonicsdude)
to be accepted they have to be able to speak, read and write english to a very high level. What difference, apart from in appearance, would it make if there were lots of Int Studs?
It's not that I don't like diversity, or learning about other cultures. In fact I would be very disappointed if I went to a university and found that everybody there was British.

Sometimes it can be difficult to get on with foreign students. I don't mean to sound racist or anything but it seems to be the case (around here anyway) that the Indians all stick together, the Chinese all stick together.. etc I know not all of them are Asian but I have been in situations before where I've felt left out for being English. I didn't want to risk that happening.


Oh and another reason which I forgot to mention before is that UCL do a more broader selection of subjects than LSE (and no, that doesn't necessarily make it better, but it appeals more to me).
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mobb_theprequel
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#31
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#31
(Original post by nevlaw)
For the last time guys...I've heard from a colleague (lawyer w/ magic circle experience) that UCL beats LSE hands down especially in terms of prestige - any thoughts?

I am an international student from the Caribbean btw.

Looking forward to putting this to rest once and for all.
The LSE name carries a lot more clout than UCL, especially in the Caribbean. I'm personally from Barbados - and I hope to return and practice there in the twilight of my professional life. The path from the LSE to the English Bar, and then on to work as a leading practitioner, before holding high office in the Carribean is indeed a well-trodden one. I can also share the experiences of an aunt who read law at the LSE, before working in the Caribbean [BVI, the Cayman Islands and finally as Chief Counsel to the Bermudan Government]. Of the Caribbean contingent in my aunt's cohort - one person went on to become Deputy Prime Minister of Antigua, and all the others enjoyed successful careers in law and oftentimes public office back on their home islands.

Arguably, there is no better preparation, save for an Oxford degree, than an LLB or BSc. Econ from the LSE; and this is affirmed by the School's association with such luminaries as Michael Manley, Errol Barrow and Forbes Burnham - a vein of history which UCL is and will forever be at pains to match, at least in that part of the world.
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Onearmedbandit
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#32
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(Original post by mobb_theprequel)
The LSE name carries a lot more clout than UCL, especially in the Caribbean. I'm personally from Barbados - and I hope to return and practice there in the twilight of my professional life. The path from the LSE to the English Bar, and then on to work as a leading practitioner, before holding high office in the Carribean is indeed a well-trodden one. I can also share the experiences of an aunt who read law at the LSE, before working in the Caribbean [BVI, the Cayman Islands and finally as Chief Counsel to the Bermudan Government]. Of the Caribbean contingent in my aunt's cohort - one person went on to become Deputy Prime Minister of Antigua, and all the others enjoyed successful careers in law and oftentimes public office back on their home islands.

Arguably, there is no better preparation, save for an Oxford degree, than an LLB or BSc. Econ from the LSE; and this is affirmed by the School's association with such luminaries as Michael Manley, Errol Barrow and Forbes Burnham - a vein of history which UCL is and will forever be at pains to match, at least in that part of the world.
Yeah.. well... the UCL law building's café has fresh croissants
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mobb_theprequel
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Onearmedbandit)
Yeah.. well... the UCL law building's café has fresh croissants
Well, I guess we have a winner! :cool:
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Xanthe
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#34
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#34
What about Cherie Booth QC? She studied at the School, too.
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mobb_theprequel
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Xanthe)
What about Cherie Booth QC? She studied at the School, too.
Yes, but besides the odd midsummer sojourn to the Lesser Antilles - I don't think she has too much to do with the Caribbean.

I found out earlier this week that Ms. Booth is the only person in the history of the LSE to gain a first on every single paper in the LLB.
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Lawz-
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#36
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#36
(Original post by Xanthe)
What about Cherie Booth QC? She studied at the School, too.

One QC who we'd never have heard of but for her husband?
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Phonicsdude
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#37
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#37
She is actually an exceptional barrister: a more intelligent individual than her husband!

I didnt know the UCL cafe had fresh croissant! To think that I spent so long deliberating between UCL and Kings!
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Lawz-
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#38
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(Original post by mobb_theprequel)
The LSE name carries a lot more clout than UCL, especially in the Caribbean. I'm personally from Barbados - and I hope to return and practice there in the twilight of my professional life. The path from the LSE to the English Bar, and then on to work as a leading practitioner, before holding high office in the Carribean is indeed a well-trodden one. I can also share the experiences of an aunt who read law at the LSE, before working in the Caribbean [BVI, the Cayman Islands and finally as Chief Counsel to the Bermudan Government]. Of the Caribbean contingent in my aunt's cohort - one person went on to become Deputy Prime Minister of Antigua, and all the others enjoyed successful careers in law and oftentimes public office back on their home islands.

Arguably, there is no better preparation, save for an Oxford degree, than an LLB or BSc. Econ from the LSE; and this is affirmed by the School's association with such luminaries as Michael Manley, Errol Barrow and Forbes Burnham - a vein of history which UCL is and will forever be at pains to match, at least in that part of the world.
LSE built its reputation in other areas - mos specifically economics, and then feeds off of that for other disciplines such as law.

I personally dont think that LSE is any better than UCL or KCL, and those who employ people from those universities on a large scale would seem to agree.
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Lawz-
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#39
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(Original post by Phonicsdude)
She is actually an exceptional barrister: a more intelligent individual than her husband!

I didnt know the UCL cafe had fresh croissant! To think that I spent so long deliberating between UCL and Kings!
She's ok ... there are far brighter barristers out there who we never hear about... I dont think shes bright enough to make it to the CA or higher, but then she isnt a chancery barrister - so im prone to look down my nose
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Phonicsdude
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#40
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What is the CA?
What is a chancery barrister?

Im presuming the two are linked (by chancery..?)
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