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    hey all you drama types out there!
    been offered an interview at Royal Welsh College, but need a Jacobean / Elizabeathan speech for my audition, and i dont know what t do. must be approx 2 mins, and doesnt have to be shakespeare!

    any suggestions would be FANTASTIC cos i'm cacking my ickle pants!
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    Do Shakespeare.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Do Shakespeare.
    A soliloquy from King Lear or Othello would work well (don't do Hamlet - everyone does Hamlet).
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Do Shakespeare.
    lol, yeah its your best bet sam
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    Yeah shakespeare would be good - something like the seven ages of man? all the world is a stage...lol...
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Do Shakespeare.
    but why? the panel will probably ahve heard every shakespeare speech EVER! shouldnt i give them something fresh?
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    (Original post by El_Borish)
    but why? the panel will probably ahve heard every shakespeare speech EVER! shouldnt i give them something fresh?
    I would have thought they'll like it more if they know what it is and you give them a new interpretation...give it your own style...
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    Alternatively, wear a bright red fez, and shake a spear around above your head. Then shout out "What's that", leave dramatic pose and shout "Shakespeare".
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    Yeah shakespeare would be good - something like the seven ages of man? all the world is a stage...lol...
    but if i did something famous like that, i'd have to do ot REALLY dman weel, ocs everyone will have done it, and they'll ahve seen ppl do it better than me, lowernig their opinion.

    its like nobody would ever do "is this a dagger..."

    its just plain foolhardy!
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Alternatively, wear a bright red fez, and shake a spear around above your head. Then shout out "What's that", leave dramatic pose and shout "Shakespeare".
    ...i like
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Alternatively, wear a bright red fez, and shake a spear around above your head. Then shout out "What's that", leave dramatic pose and shout "Shakespeare".
    Now THAT would certainly be entertaining. I like!
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    (Original post by Adhsur)
    Now THAT would certainly be entertaining. I like!
    ...jinx, lol
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    PLEASE consider doing Mosca's famous soliloquay in 'Volpone' by Ben Johnson ('I fear I do grow more and more in love with myself...'- paraphrased very poorly, but still!)

    Volpone really is an excellent satire, and I don't think you could fail to impress with a speach of Mosca's, he is a great character!
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    Here, also, is the opening soliloquay of Volpone- isn't it great?!

    VOLPONE: Hail the world’s soul, and mine! more glad than is
    The teeming earth to see the long’d-for sun
    Peep through the borns of the celestial Ram,
    Am I, to view thy splendour darkening his;
    That lying here, amongst my other hoards,
    Shew’st like a flame by night, or like the day
    Struck out of chaos, when all darkness fled
    Unto the centre. O thou son of Sol,
    But brighter than thy father, let me kiss,
    With adoration, thee, and every relick
    Of sacred treasure in this blessed room.
    Well did wise poets, by thy glorious name,
    Title that age which they would have the best;
    Thou being the best of things, and far transcending
    All style of joy, in children, parents, friends,
    Or any other waking dream on earth:
    Thy looks when they to Venus did ascribe,
    They should have given her twenty thousand Cupids;
    Such are thy beauties and our loves! Dear saint,
    Riches, the dumb god, that giv’st all men tongues,
    Thou canst do nought, and yet mak’st men do all things;
    The price of souls; even hell, with thee to boot,
    Is made worth heaven. Thou art virtue, fame,
    Honour,-and all things else. Who can get thee,
    He shall be noble valiant, honest, wise—


    Got this off Google, best find a more reliable version of it if you want it!
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    Here is the glorious soliloquay of Mosca:

    MOSCA I fear, I shall begin to grow in love
    With my dear self, and my most prosperous parts,
    They do so spring and burgeon; I can feel
    A whimsy in my blood: I know not how,
    Success hath made me wanton. I could skip
    Out of my skin, now, like a subtle snake,
    I am so limber. O! your parasite
    Is a most precious thing, dropt from above,
    Not bred ’mongst clods and clodpoles, here on earth.
    I muse, the mystery was not made a science,
    It is so liberally profest! almost
    All the wise world is little else, in nature,
    But parasites or sub-parasites.—And yet,
    I mean not those that have your bare town-art,
    To know who’s fit to feed them; have no house,
    No family, no care, and therefore mould
    Tales for men’s ears, to bait that sense; or get
    Kitchen-invention, and some stale receipts
    To please the belly, and the groin; nor those,
    With their court dog-tricks, that can fawn and fleer,
    Make their revenue out of legs and faces,
    Echo my lord, and lick away a moth:
    But your fine elegant rascal, that can rise,
    And stoop, almost together, like an arrow;
    Shoot through the air as nimbly as a star;
    Turn short as doth a swallow, and be here,
    And there, and here, and yonder, all at once;
    Present to any humour, all occasion;
    And change a visor, swifter than a thought!
    This is the creature had the art born with him;
    Toils not to learn it, but doth practise it
    Out of most excellent nature: and such sparks
    Are the true parasites, others but their zanis.

    Good eh?
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    Here is the glorious soliloquay of Mosca:

    MOSCA I fear, I shall begin to grow in love
    With my dear self, and my most prosperous parts,
    They do so spring and burgeon; I can feel
    A whimsy in my blood: I know not how,
    Success hath made me wanton. I could skip
    Out of my skin, now, like a subtle snake,
    I am so limber. O! your parasite
    Is a most precious thing, dropt from above,
    Not bred ’mongst clods and clodpoles, here on earth.
    I muse, the mystery was not made a science,
    It is so liberally profest! almost
    All the wise world is little else, in nature,
    But parasites or sub-parasites.—And yet,
    I mean not those that have your bare town-art,
    To know who’s fit to feed them; have no house,
    No family, no care, and therefore mould
    Tales for men’s ears, to bait that sense; or get
    Kitchen-invention, and some stale receipts
    To please the belly, and the groin; nor those,
    With their court dog-tricks, that can fawn and fleer,
    Make their revenue out of legs and faces,
    Echo my lord, and lick away a moth:
    But your fine elegant rascal, that can rise,
    And stoop, almost together, like an arrow;
    Shoot through the air as nimbly as a star;
    Turn short as doth a swallow, and be here,
    And there, and here, and yonder, all at once;
    Present to any humour, all occasion;
    And change a visor, swifter than a thought!
    This is the creature had the art born with him;
    Toils not to learn it, but doth practise it
    Out of most excellent nature: and such sparks
    Are the true parasites, others but their zanis.

    Good eh?
    many many MANY thanx! these both look great! just home they're from the right time period?? if no i'll use one of them as my modern

    thanks again!
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    'Volpone' is Jacobean (he wrote at the same time as Shakespeare- they were friends!)

    Do a Google search- you will find loads more info!
 
 
 
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