Celeste
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What's the difference between ICT and Computing, and can I do both?
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Psyk
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They are very different subjects, although there is perhaps a little overlap. ICT is to do with how information is used within society. For example how companies use databases, how people communicate via email, stuff like that. Computing is the technical and mathematical side of it. It's about algorithms and that sort of thing. No reason you shouldn't be able to do both but I suppose some schools might not let you.
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Haddock3
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Computing for the win. its much more interesting since many people of (our) age know most of the stuff in the ICT syllabus (snore). The Computing syllabus, especially the new AQA one which I do, is much more interesting, and you learn one heck of a lot more.
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jordan12
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(Original post by Celeste)
What's the difference between ICT and Computing, and can I do both?
ICT deals more with the organisational and business side of IT systems, and the theory behind good data, types of information and information flows. You study topics like the Nature of Information, Role of IT in Organisations, and Management Information Systems.

Computing is a lot more technical, with less emphasis on business and more emphasis on the actual design and programming of IT systems.
Computing involves a lot of maths, and unlike ICT, you will actually be expected to learn how to use a number of programming languages. Topics include things such as Networking, Hardware and Operating Systems.

And yes, it is possible to study both of them, though if you study Computing, you should consider whether you would be better off complementing it with Maths (if that's not already one of your choices), or contrasting it with a humanities subject, since ICT is often considered one of the 'softer' A-Level options.

Remember that both of them include lots of coursework, so if you take both on, you're going to have periods where you're under a lot of stress to meet deadlines for coursework submission.
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Matty919
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Computing is a lot better imo, ICT seems to consist of mainly making spreadsheets,databases and a few websites. Some Unis also consider ICT a "soft" subject. I did ICT for GCSE and by the end of it had enough of databases and spreadsheets. Computing which im taking for A-Level I find interesting in places.
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brenid
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ICT is softer - but wasn't supposed to be originally - it was supposed to cover telecommunications subjects that weren't covered by 'traditional' studies in computer sciene that taught programming and software engineering. ICT can cover routing and configuration - or at least that was the idea. I think now ICT is the same as 'MIS' - management infortmation systems - that are aimed at people who will use the information contained in computing systems in a company but won't actually do any programming. If you want to know about computing and the sort of tools that are out there - SAP, BusinesObjects, then I'd suggest doing ICT. But if you want to be a real 'techie' I'd suggest doing Computing. It depends what interests you - computing science will always be more in depth and for people who are happier working on difficult mathematical problems rather than organisational ones. Beware though - skills in computing can get outdated pretty sharpish and you'll be upgarding your skills annually for the rest of your career. But if you love computing then you'd enjoy that anyway. Do your research though - take a look at really heavy industrial CS firms like Quinetic (http://www.qinetiq.co.uk/home/career...rs_in_fes.html) and then compare it to SAP (https://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/scn/uac) - because someone happy in one of those environments isn't likely to be happy in the other!
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Ella.parfitt
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What is the difference between. Computering and ict
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TrashTalker101
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(Original post by Ella.parfitt)
What is the difference between. Computering and ict
Computering (Facepalm)
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Captainmmn
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When i chose computing as an option ,I thought we';d start of the subject straight away but my teacher made it so its computer/it ,so you get to choose which one you want to start in yr 10. .At first i was bummed but then when we did some computing the coding was really hard and i realised if i chose computing I'd probably get a D but if i chose IT I'd likely get an A .
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gsgsa\h
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In my opinion: computing AND ict is useful in different ways in the future. For example, computing can make you become good at coding which can lead for you to be maybe a programmer, game designer and etc... And ict can make you become good at using your computer which can lead for you to get most likely a good job that involves for you to work with computers and complicated technology!
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username2130115
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#11
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1 17-06-2009 16:03
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krisshP
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#12
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(Original post by jordan12)
Computing involves a lot of maths, and unlike ICT, you will actually be expected to learn how to use a number of programming languages. Topics include things such as Networking, Hardware and Operating Systems.
a bit off-topic really, but where exactly even is the Maths? It's not that I am doing Computing A-Level currently. Instead, I'm at uni, finished 2nd yr of Maths degree, and am currently self-teaching Python after having done SQL . So, is it like after you have experience in Python of say like a solid yr or two, then you can step into the more technical and more Mathsy side Python? Or do you mean other languages? I THINK Ruby programming language is quite Mathsy, and R programming language too for the Stats side. I am actually going to be even learning some (hopefully) of R programming in a 3rd yr module of my degree, but who knows how much they'll cram into t despite the time constraints and the presumably big size of the R language.

Thanks!
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2190243
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(Original post by krisshP)
a bit off-topic really, but where exactly even is the Maths? It's not that I am doing Computing A-Level currently. Instead, I'm at uni, finished 2nd yr of Maths degree, and am currently self-teaching Python after having done SQL . So, is it like after you have experience in Python of say like a solid yr or two, then you can step into the more technical and more Mathsy side Python? Or do you mean other languages? I THINK Ruby programming language is quite Mathsy, and R programming language too for the Stats side. I am actually going to be even learning some (hopefully) of R programming in a 3rd yr module of my degree, but who knows how much they'll cram into t despite the time constraints and the presumably big size of the R language.

Thanks!
Computer Science is heavily dependant on Maths and you won't get very far without it. Computer Science is a SCIENCE, so naturally maths comes into it. Various kinds of Mathematics comes into it such as probability, statistics and logic etc. Different sections of Computer Science depend on different levels of Maths. For example, cryptography and advanced algorithms require a decent amount of discrete and complexity theory Mathematics.

Programming requires some levels of Maths but not much. Again, it depends on what field you work in. Most jobs don't require Maths but if you're good at it then you will certainly have an edge over your peers. For things like Python, Maths is hardly required. It comes more into 3D modelling with geometry is essential
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krisshP
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(Original post by iHammmy)
Computer Science is heavily dependant on Maths and you won't get very far without it. Computer Science is a SCIENCE, so naturally maths comes into it. Various kinds of Mathematics comes into it such as probability, statistics and logic etc. Different sections of Computer Science depend on different levels of Maths. For example, cryptography and advanced algorithms require a decent amount of discrete and complexity theory Mathematics.

Programming requires some levels of Maths but not much. Again, it depends on what field you work in. Most jobs don't require Maths but if you're good at it then you will certainly have an edge over your peers. For things like Python, Maths is hardly required. It comes more into 3D modelling with geometry is essential
hmmm, OK thanks for that! I'm currently on a Maths degree, 2nd yr done, so yes Maths is my interest, especially the Probability & Stats side. Looking to learn IT Packages to become a Data Analyst/Data Scientist/Statistician in future. Done with SQL, and now on Python, and shall try to squeeze in Excel VBA in this summer too if possible. Any tips? You seem to be quite clever here .

Thanks!

EDIT: I'm just after a Mathsy job actually! , just trying to grasp hold of some IT Packages this summer to help for my applications to job I'll be chasing throughout my 3rd yr of uni.

Oh and yes, I even took some Discrete Maths module in my degree, 2nd yr, but tbh algorithms and working with them honestly just isn't my interest at all really I'm afraid. I'm more inclined towards the Stats kind of side of Maths. As such, I've even picked up as many Stats-related modules as possible in my 3rd yr of uni. One of the modules, Linear Models and Regression Analysis, mentions that I'll learn how to use R programming to analyse linear models. I've heard that R programming is very handy, so that's nice , just hope we can cover through R programming is as much depth as possible, but this module itself is being taught for the first time at my uni actually, so who knows...
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2190243
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(Original post by krisshP)
hmmm, OK thanks for that! I'm currently on a Maths degree, 2nd yr done, so yes Maths is my interest, especially the Probability & Stats side. Looking to learn IT Packages to become a Data Analyst/Data Scientist/Statistician in future. Done with SQL, and now on Python, and shall try to squeeze in Excel VBA in this summer too if possible. Any tips? You seem to be quite clever here .

Thanks!

EDIT: I'm just after a Mathsy job actually! , just trying to grasp hold of some IT Packages this summer to help for my applications to job I'll be chasing throughout my 3rd yr of uni.

Oh and yes, I even took some Discrete Maths module in my degree, 2nd yr, but tbh algorithms and working with them honestly just isn't my interest at all really I'm afraid. I'm more inclined towards the Stats kind of side of Maths. As such, I've even picked up as many Stats-related modules as possible in my 3rd yr of uni. One of the modules, Linear Models and Regression Analysis, mentions that I'll learn how to use R programming to analyse linear models. I've heard that R programming is very handy, so that's nice , just hope we can cover through R programming is as much depth as possible, but this module itself is being taught for the first time at my uni actually, so who knows...
No worries, good luck with R
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krisshP
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(Original post by iHammmy)
No worries, good luck with R
how big's R? Like it seems as if Python is 3x bigger than SQL to study through. But, of course, proper learning of any IT Package is through long-term application, just like if u learn any other language, like say Spanish...

EDIT: What IT Packages are useful for Stats kind of roles? I so far know of R as a BIG one, Ruby I've just heard of and lastly Python which I'm already studying (currently on Generators after having looked at Lambdas).

Also, just out of curiosity, what IT Packages would you need in order to be able to make your own apps for Android phones?

THANKS!
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2190243
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(Original post by krisshP)
how big's R? Like it seems as if Python is 3x bigger than SQL to study through. But, of course, proper learning of any IT Package is through long-term application, just like if u learn any other language, like say Spanish...

EDIT: What IT Packages are useful for Stats kind of roles? I so far know of R as a BIG one, Ruby I've just heard of and lastly Python which I'm already studying (currently on Generators after having looked at Lambdas).

Also, just out of curiosity, what IT Packages would you need in order to be able to make your own apps for Android phones?

THANKS!
R is great for statistical computing. It's used a lot in data science just like Python. IIRC most physics uni courses have a Python module. I've never used R, but this could be a good place to start if you want to learn more about R packages.

I'm pretty sure Android apps are written in Java, and the Android Development Studio is a good IDE to use . I've heard that this is a good documentation about Android development.

Good luck and just reply if you want more info
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krisshP
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(Original post by iHammmy)
R is great for statistical computing. It's used a lot in data science just like Python. IIRC most physics uni courses have a Python module. I've never used R, but this could be a good place to start if you want to learn more about R packages.

I'm pretty sure Android apps are written in Java, and the Android Development Studio is a good IDE to use . I've heard that this is a good documentation about Android development.

Good luck and just reply if you want more info
But didn't you say Python wasn't so Mathsy??? I presume that it's not so much useful for Statistical Analysis on its own, but with the use of some 3rd party modules/libraries out there, it becomes pretty damn useful, right?

Programming seems quite cool for me, but I seem to actually prefer the application of the language you study, like how in my Python course, I made a simple basic calculator along with (more recently) a Text Analyzer that basically gives you the % occupied by each a-z character in a given .txt file . Would you say that to construct more complicated programmes, it must take years worth of Python experience or more/less?

EDIT: I think I really should've taken Comp Sci @ A-level tbh back in my A-level days, I reckon I would've liked it
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2190243
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(Original post by krisshP)
But didn't you say Python wasn't so Mathsy??? I presume that it's not so much useful for Statistical Analysis on its own, but with the use of some 3rd party modules/libraries out there, it becomes pretty damn useful, right?

Programming seems quite cool for me, but I seem to actually prefer the application of the language you study, like how in my Python course, I made a simple basic calculator along with (more recently) a Text Analyzer that basically gives you the % occupied by each a-z character in a given .txt file . Would you say that to construct more complicated programmes, it must take years worth of Python experience or more/less?

EDIT: I think I really should've taken Comp Sci @ A-level tbh back in my A-level days, I reckon I would've liked it
I suppose it really depends on what you're doing, but most Python projects don't require maths. It really depends on how fast of a learner you are, how often you practise and what experience you have. An experienced programmer would be able to pick up Python pretty quickly and it wouldn't take them long to be creating complicated projects.

I don't think A-Level comp sci is that in-depth, you could always find the specification online and go through it yourself .
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brandon harrison
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basicly yea don't do either u stupid cant
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