Can you get an A* at A-level? Watch

This discussion is closed.
nageen
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#21
Report 13 years ago
#21
plz help me
u know my previouse centre has not decline my grade and they r still not doing it after i have said them so many times.they r against me coz i left their school.
plz tell me wot can i do if they didn't decline i would left with no certification of A level chemistry.
my uni offer is A level chemtry at A grade.but wot would happen
plz if any1 of u have any advice .tell me how can i sort out this problem.coz talking to my previouse centre is no hope
so any advice will be helpful
could any other centre decline my grade?
plz pm me
0
Jenni_Kitten
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#22
Report 13 years ago
#22
(Original post by nageen)
plz help me
u know my previouse centre has not decline my grade and they r still not doing it after i have said them so many times.they r against me coz i left their school.
plz tell me wot can i do if they didn't decline i would left with no certification of A level chemistry.
my uni offer is A level chemtry at A grade.but wot would happen
plz if any1 of u have any advice .tell me how can i sort out this problem.coz talking to my previouse centre is no hope
so any advice will be helpful
could any other centre decline my grade?
plz pm me
I don't really understand what you mean, you must have taken the full a level in Chermistry? So you have the certificate to prove what grade you got and it's too late...

If you mean you took AS last year, you must be doing A2 this year and therefore you don't need to decline your AS grade since it will be simply added on to your A2 for the full A level.
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#23
Report 13 years ago
#23
I don't see the advantage of adding an "a1" for 90% and "a2" for 95%, that's not going to seperate the bright from the very bright, just show who does more revision/more work on potential questions. A-levels should be made harder, far too many people get straight A's, fact is, some people who are not all that bright get the same credit as the VERY clever people.

I'd also say the exams should be longer, currently, you are tested in most subjects by about 3 hours of exams when supposedly you know at least enough to do at least twice that in an exam.
0
Mata
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#24
Report 13 years ago
#24
Oh lord, exams should be made harder?! Please no.

Actually, that's a fair enough comment because I've done about 2 hours of revision so far (high estimate) for two subjects which I hope to get AA for (high A's at that). And I may just get away with it. If I can do that then yep, exams probably aren't hard enough.

I also think that we should get an 'A+' grade, which is what our school does. They have a system of giving practice paper after practice paper, and tons of essays every week, so we know exactly what grade we'd get if we took the exam on that day, and I've been given an 'A+' or 'A*' when I get extremely high marks- why not have that in the actual exam?
0
usa1981
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#25
Report 13 years ago
#25
You could have an A* for the top 10% of pupils that recives A Grdes at A-Levels.
0
Elles
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#26
Report 13 years ago
#26
I don't think that getting say a 96% as opposed to an 89% necessarily discriminates in ability & hence worthiness of different grade though.

Especially because, as I mentioned, the AEAs were especially designed to further separate the top X % of students getting A grades & they were separated in an entirely different way to their distribution of A2 UMS marks... plenty of 100% UMS people I know failed them or got merits.. & others with lower UMS marks got Distinctions.

... I suppose it all comes down to what you want to be rewarding - focus on the syllabus & a good memory for a multitude of facts or the ability to apply knowledge to unfamiliar situations that you can't have really been 'coached' for?
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#27
Report 13 years ago
#27
Totally agree with the above
0
Mata
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#28
Report 13 years ago
#28
Oh, now I'm confused...

"I suppose it all comes down to what you want to be rewarding - focus on the syllabus & a good memory for a multitude of facts or the ability to apply knowledge to unfamiliar situations that you can't have really been 'coached' for?"

This sounds greedy, but I'd quite like to be rewarded for both? I don't know... I like the AEA system a lot, and will be taking two of them, but some of my friends are taking subjects in which they can't do an AEA, and would like some distinction between a 98% A, and an 82% A, for example.
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#29
Report 13 years ago
#29
You could say that about anything though, if they bring in an A* for 90%, then 600/600 candidates will say "i want an a** with distinction", it's unneccessary in my opinion. I only feel it matters for people going to oxford.cambridge - and they already ask for ums marks.
0
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#30
Report 13 years ago
#30
(Original post by Chris.)
You could say that about anything though, if they bring in an A* for 90%, then 600/600 candidates will say "i want an a** with distinction", it's unneccessary in my opinion. I only feel it matters for people going to oxford.cambridge - and they already ask for ums marks.
That's a very good point. People with higher UMS marks will always feel it's unfair that they get the same grade as someone with a lower mark. What I think would be good is if everyone had to list their UMS marks as well as their AS grades on their UCAS forms. That way, universities would have more information to use when deciding who they should give offers to, but there would be no need for an A* grade.
0
wackysparkle
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#31
Report 13 years ago
#31
no u can't get an A* at a level, but at the end of the 2 year progarm u can do something called an extension award for any particular subject. it's supposed to be hard, but it wouldn't affect ur a level grade at all, instead it looks good on ur CV, and colleges will look at u differently from the rest. In this test, u have merit, distinction and simple pass. I guess u could look at it like getting an A* at a level if u get a distinction on this paper. Hope this info helped!
0
Elles
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#32
Report 13 years ago
#32
(Original post by kellywood_5)
What I think would be good is if everyone had to list their UMS marks as well as their AS grades on their UCAS forms.
i'm still not convinced by using the UMS thing anymore than to distinguish grade boundaries...

as i alluded to originally - i think to further stratify the A grades students another type of method is required, along the lines of that employed in the AEAs..

because i don't think you can really justify suggesting a difference of a few accumulating UMS marks within a boundary discriminates candidates on the basis of their ability for the subject being examined.

instead, as i said, generally full or very high UMS marks will just be a marker for within the group of 'good students' those with especially good memory or perhaps more disturbingly (in terms of socio-economic divisions), those who have been taught very well with close attention to a syllabus, or who can afford to re-sit papers over & over until they obtain 100% UMS in all of them.


so to combat this - i propose scratching the 'resit' system. the increased utilisation of 'extension' papers & perhaps bringing back subject specific uni entrance exams as standard. *traditionalist* :p:
0
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#33
Report 13 years ago
#33
(Original post by Elles)
i'm still not convinced by using the UMS thing anymore than to distinguish grade boundaries...

as i alluded to originally - i think to further stratify the A grades students another type of method is required, along the lines of that employed in the AEAs..

because i don't think you can really justify suggesting a difference of a few accumulating UMS marks within a boundary discriminates candidates on the basis of their ability for the subject being examined.

instead, as i said, generally full or very high UMS marks will just be a marker for within the group of 'good students' those with especially good memory or perhaps more disturbingly (in terms of socio-economic divisions), those who have been taught very well with close attention to a syllabus, or who can afford to re-sit papers over & over until they obtain 100% UMS in all of them.

so to combat this - i propose scratching the 'resit' system. the increased utilisation of 'extension' papers & perhaps bringing back subject specific uni entrance exams as standard. *traditionalist* :p:
I definitely agree with scrapping resits- it's stupid that you can now resit a paper as many times as you want and the highest mark counts. If the resit system was to be kept, as it is possible to just have a bad day, you should only be allowed to resit each paper once and unis should be able to see whether you're resitting and what you got the first time around. Aren't Advanced Extension Awards extension papers then? :p: I didn't know there used to be subject-specific entrance exams for uni, but that's a good idea. Everyone could sit them in school/college at the start of Year 13 and the results could then be sent off to the universities along with their UCAS forms.
0
Elles
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#34
Report 13 years ago
#34
(Original post by kellywood_5)
Aren't Advanced Extension Awards extension papers then? :p:
they are indeed (although there are still STEP - "sixth term extension papers" too for Maths) - my point was just about the wider utilisation of such papers, because judging by this forum - not all schools are very aware or disseminating the info about them...which is perhaps ultimately hampering unis from actively using them.

I didn't know there used to be subject-specific entrance exams for uni, but that's a good idea.
actually, they may have originally actually been even broader than that - I think Oxford just had it's own generic Entrance exam, complete with oodles of Latin etc. but nowadays i suppose the only equivalent might be the Tab 'Thinking Skills Assessment' which a number of subjects take, AFAIK?

& Oxbridge have certainly continued to have their own MVAT/OMAT type exams - now superseded by the BMAT which even more medical/vet schools are using, so in certain subjects it seems like we are certainly heading that way.. (my original post was probably misleading, sorry, i don't think most universities used to use subject specific entrance exams.. but then, getting an A at A level used to be rare! ) but then designing such tests is no doubt a nightmare..

& I've never been a fan of the resit thing... & think if places are going to consider UMS marks it's definitely something that needs to be considered - because it'll lead to even more, ultimately fairly futile, resitting of A grade papers to make them even higher etc. & more coaching for very specific exams etc. which surely is what you should be trying to get away from in terms of selecting students with aptitude for university level study..
0
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#35
Report 13 years ago
#35
(Original post by Elles)
they are indeed (although there are still STEP - "sixth term extension papers" too for Maths) - my point was just about the wider utilisation of such papers, because judging by this forum - not all schools are very aware or disseminating the info about them...which is perhaps ultimately hampering unis from actively using them.
Yep, I agree- I've only ever heard one teacher at my school mention them, and that was when he suggested at parents' evening that I take AEA history next year! :hahaha: The really funny thing is, he doesn't even teach me history! He's the head of history and sociology, but he only teaches me sociology. Maybe if all schools had to offer AEAs and the top unis gave out conditional offers based on them as well as A-levels, that would solve the problem, but it wouldn't help them to decide who to give offers to in the first place, which I think is the main problem.

(Original post by Elles)
actually, they may have originally actually been even broader than that - I think Oxford just had it's own generic Entrance exam, complete with oodles of Latin etc. but nowadays i suppose the only equivalent might be the Tab 'Thinking Skills Assessment' which a number of subjects take, AFAIK?

& Oxbridge have certainly continued to have their own MVAT/OMAT type exams - now superseded by the BMAT which even more medical/vet schools are using, so in certain subjects it seems like we are certainly heading that way.. (my original post was probably misleading, sorry, i don't think most universities used to use subject specific entrance exams.. but then, getting an A at A level used to be rare! ) but then designing such tests is no doubt a nightmare..

& I've never been a fan of the resit thing... & think if places are going to consider UMS marks it's definitely something that needs to be considered - because it'll lead to even more, ultimately fairly futile, resitting of A grade papers to make them even higher etc. & more coaching for very specific exams etc. which surely is what you should be trying to get away from in terms of selecting students with aptitude for university level study..
Seems like there are 3 main options then; let all universities set their own entrance exams for individual subjects, make A-levels harder/make the grade boundaries higher so less people get As, or abolish the resit system and put UMS marks on UCAS forms.
0
clairey87
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#36
Report 13 years ago
#36
An 'A' at GCSE is said to be worth 'C' at AS/A2. I don't think it's true though. A2's are awful!
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#37
Report 13 years ago
#37
I don't know where all these comparisons are coming from - the courses are completely different material, and some as's require a bit of brainpower unlike gcse's. I know for a fact i would really struggle to get a C in A-Level french having got an A at gcse.

Plenty of people will work hard for an A at gcse and not have a chance at A-level
0
clairey87
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#38
Report 13 years ago
#38
Same here, I got an A at GCSE and a C at AS. It is so much harder. The same for English too, A at GCSE, C at AS!
0
Chris.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#39
Report 13 years ago
#39
(Original post by clairey87)
Same here, I got an A at GCSE and a C at AS. It is so much harder. The same for English too, A at GCSE, C at AS!
I'm confused, i'm disagreeing and you're agreeing with me :p:
0
Feria
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#40
Report 13 years ago
#40
Some universities such as Cmabridge and Oxford have a seperate entry form in which you have to list your UMS scores too.

Personnally, I guess it makes it easier for some universities when it comes to the points system too...

My marks vary sometimes those, sometimes I get 100 UMS and sometimes I get ones as low as 83 UMS ... its still strange and weird how they both count as an A, but I think in the end, it doesnt really matter... Once you're at Uni, it hardly matters.
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Aston University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (1111)
79.07%
Leave (294)
20.93%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed