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    I really have no knowledge of postgraduate study whatsoever and I'm just making a general inquiry out of interest, as this may be something I'd like to do in future.

    Say I earned a first class degree in English from Glasgow, and earned a place at Cambridge for postgraduate study (as my cousin's best friend has just done, except for geography), would I be able to complete a masters degree for a year or two and then go on to work in something like publishing, or is the whole point of postgraduate study a stepping stone to becoming an academic/teacher?

    That's not to say I won't decide to become either of those things in a few years' time, but I just want to keep all my options open, and am wondering if a masters/PhD opens doors.
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    Well depends on the specific subject in relation to geoscience you can only do certin jobs with a postgrad degree e.g apply to one of the large oli companies. A science PhD will possibly also relate to industry in one apect hence companies often want high level research hence you can be employed that way.

    So in science the academic route is not the only route per se

    I'm sure some people can give better advise on a arts subject but im positive it can open doors that would otherwise be closed
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    Doing postgrad doesn´t hinder your job prospects, but you would have to be prepared to be that bit older and still get the same starting salary as depending upon your area, MAs etc aren´t usually renumerated so well.
    My boss did an MA and PhD in the hispanic field and focussed on film and visual arts and now runs a relatively famous film institute in London...so it can all be beneficial in the end
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    I believe the government are looking to make teaching a masters level profession; every future secondary school teacher would have their undergraduate degree and a MA in Education with QTS (or something similar) instead of the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE), which has no masters level components despite the name. If you want to teach at postgraduate level you have to have a PhD though.

    In the current financial climate I would stay in higher education. You will probably not have any issues securing funding due to your grades, and you will be one of the most highly qualified regardless of what profession you choose to enter. Do not drop out after finishing your masters!
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    (Original post by evantej)
    I believe the government are looking to make teaching a masters level profession; every future secondary school teacher would have their undergraduate degree and a MA in Education with QTS (or something similar) instead of the Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE), which has no masters level components despite the name. If you want to teach at postgraduate level you have to have a PhD though.

    In the current financial climate I would stay in higher education. You will probably not have any issues securing funding due to your grades, and you will be one of the most highly qualified regardless of what profession you choose to enter. Do not drop out after finishing your masters!
    Are you sure? I know quite a few PGCE students, and the way it currently works is that they get their certificate for doing all the normal PGCE work, and they also submit two essays which are submitted at masters level, each being worth 30 credits. They are then strongly encouraged to do a masters in education part-time for two years after finishing their NQT year. The system you describe sounds much much worse, so I hope you're not correct!
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    I'm starting a PhD in October, and I don't know whether I'd want to go into lecturing or not.
    My main reasons for doing it are;

    - Current job market
    - It would be an amazing life achievement
    - I enjoy academic tasks, and have done well throughout my undergrad course

    Anything else would be a bonus.
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    (Original post by LLB Kevin)
    Are you sure? I know quite a few PGCE students, and the way it currently works is that they get their certificate for doing all the normal PGCE work, and they also submit two essays which are submitted at masters level, each being worth 30 credits. They are then strongly encouraged to do a masters in education part-time for two years after finishing their NQT year. The system you describe sounds much much worse, so I hope you're not correct!
    You are absolutely right about the way it is currently structured, but I believe they will be forced to study for the masters, or the PGCE qualification will changed as a long term solution.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    You are absolutely right about the way it is currently structured, but I believe they will be forced to study for the masters, or the PGCE qualification will changed as a long term solution.
    They already HAVE to study half of the MA in Education course; there's no opting out of that part I don't think.
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    They already HAVE to study half of the MA in Education course; there's no opting out of that part I don't think.
    The PGCE no longer serves its purpose; that is the point. You are right to suggest that students only study half the required points, but the MA in Education is a short-term solution. It is not the case that the students have studied for half the Masters on the PGCE, but that the Masters has been tailored towards those studying a PGCE; to cover the latter's failure.
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    (Original post by Ghost)
    I'm starting a PhD in October, and I don't know whether I'd want to go into lecturing or not.
    My main reasons for doing it are;

    - Current job market
    - It would be an amazing life achievement
    - I enjoy academic tasks, and have done well throughout my undergrad course

    Anything else would be a bonus.
    So is doing a PhD a commitment to becoming a lecturer or something similar, or can it be used to go into all sorts of employment in your area?

    Good luck with yours btw.
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    not necessarily, I'm considering doing an MA in Literary Translation just because I'm really interested in it (and it puts me off having to decide what to do with my life for another year :P)
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)
    So is doing a PhD a commitment to becoming a lecturer or something similar, or can it be used to go into all sorts of employment in your area?

    Good luck with yours btw.
    Thanks .
    A PhD is essential for becomming a lecturer nowadays, but it doesn't mean you have to become one. Many people who do PhDs do tend to stay in academia, as researchers and eventually as lecturers. At the end of the day, you can do what you want. Some people argue it will close doors, but I can't see that happening.

    Whilst PhDs do teach you how to be a researcher, they also teach you many other skills - time management, project management, report writing, communication (with supervisors, other researchers, hospitals or whoever you'd be dealing with to carry out trials), public speaking (by giving talks at conferences etc), and allows you to bridge gaps between different areas of speciality - for example, I've graduated in Computing Science, but my PhD will have a large aspect of healthcare in it, which will hopefully allow me to do more things in that area.

    Those are skills which are just as valuable in industry as they are in academia. Three years isn't a long time either - I'm 22, and will have my PhD when I'm 25. Roughly 20% of the students in the final year of my undergrad course were around 24 or 25.
 
 
 

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