Do newspapers have the right to publish what they want? Watch

junglegirl
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or does it have to be true? and what if it's a breach of privacy....
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DCalfine
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http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage...r-cool-ad.html

Obviously so. Even if it is a load of rubbish. End of...
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junglegirl
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(Original post by DCalfine)
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage...r-cool-ad.html

Obviously so. Even if it is a load of rubbish. End of...
:rofl:
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Fawn
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You really think if they could make up rubbish we would have such boring news stories?
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junglegirl
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(Original post by Fawn)
You really think if they could make up rubbish we would have such boring news stories?
I mean if some woman came forward to a newspaper saying she'd been having an affair with obama, and without any proof could the newspaper publish it and claim it to be true?
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EGjeff
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^ The reporter is putting his / the papers neck on the line with something like that so he atleast has to have some sort of evidence it could be true.

Technically they could print it anything they want, but without any proof it would be highly foolish of them to do so and they would face the repercussions...

If it goes to court the law assumes the words printed by the paper are false, its up to the paper to prove otherwise.

Have a look into Libel Law if you wanna read more into it;
http://www.aubi06.dsl.pipex.com/law/libelcheck.shtml
Last edited by EGjeff; 9 years ago
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nouvelle_vague
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(Original post by junglegirl)
I mean if some woman came forward to a newspaper saying she'd been having an affair with obama, and without any proof could the newspaper publish it and claim it to be true?
What are you going to do!? :eek:

Generally there has to be some evidence or proof in order to be a viable article. Although clearly, in some cases a lot of hearsay / total bull crap can be used to make news too
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Tink12
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to a certain extent, but not EVERYTHING, simply because they'd get their asses sued.
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Nick_000
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No.

They frequently do though and get sued a lot. Do you never notice the little apologies they make in the paper?

A noticable incident of papers publishing something they shouldn't is when the Daily Mail named those who they believed responsible for the death of Stephen Lawrence and dared them to sue.
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MewMachine
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(Original post by junglegirl)
I mean if some woman came forward to a newspaper saying she'd been having an affair with obama, and without any proof could the newspaper publish it and claim it to be true?
Well in theory yes, but they could quite easily be sued for defamation (sic?). As newspapers are privately owned, I believe they have the right to be biased as they wish, but to not publish lies.
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Robbbb
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Newspapers should be allowed to publish what they want if the information they write is public. The ethics of this is a whole different story
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Danny_777
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HELL no. The disclosure of private information is protected by the ECHR and Article 6 (right to a private life) and enforced horizontally via a very strained common law version of the action for breach of confidence, which has essentially become a privacy tort.

See Campbell v MGN, Peck v UK, etc.
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Danny_777
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(Original post by Robbbb)
Newspapers should be allowed to publish what they want if the information they write is public. The ethics of this is a whole different story
If the information is already in the 'public domain', they are - it is no longer private and cannot be protected by privacy/breach of confidence law.
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lewis132
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There's stories of reporters getting "acciedently" shot at if they don't stick with the soldiers when reporting in Iraq and instead go and try to take unauthorised imageswhich don't show the soldiers in a great light.

Vietnam was the only uncensored war. This current one is heavily covered up.
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SouthernFreerider
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of course they dont have the right to publish whatever they want.

the public media can (and have) ruined the lives of people by making false accusations. public media is an extremely influencial and powerful tool, and no-one has the right to go around making up **** willy nilly.

all they have to do is make some accusations, and people WILL believe it. it doesn't matter if they then get sued, or retract the statements, some (if not most) people won't be made aware of the fact it wasn't true.
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Surfers_Paradise*09*
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Certainly not, its called Media Law

However, if they do publish something that has truth in it, then they can use the defence - Absolute Privilege

Again, Fair Comment is something that journalists need to make sure they cover so they are not libellous.
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Paxdax
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Within the bounds of the law (ie it can't be slander), yes.
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