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MA - New York or London (for a British student) ? watch

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    Hi,

    I’ve been offered a place on an MA course in England, but I’m also thinking about looking into some courses in the USA. While I start investigating this, if anyone can please comment on the following I would much appreciate it:

    1. Are MA or MSc course fees in the US comparable with the UK?

    2. Is New York more expensive to live as a student than London?

    3. How do foreign students survive in America considering that the US student visa does not permit any kind of part-time work? (that has to be the most ridiculous rule ever. So the only foreign students in the US are (a) rich, or (b) working illegally for low pay and therefore way too many hours, at a detriment to their studies)

    4. Does the UK student loans organisation pay course fees for universities abroad (I know; sorry if this is obvious or a stupid question, but I have a lot to find out about in a short space of time).

    5. Am I too late to get a place for this September?

    Thanks very much in advance.

    john
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    Oh dear. Methinks you need to do a bit more research.

    a) course fees are astronomical in the US. For undergrad they have a really good grants system and for PhDs there is quite a bit of funding but at Masters level you are basically screwed (you don't even need a Masters to do a PhD, I believe, so they're not viewed very highly). ESPECIALLY in the arts. There is the Fulbright scheme but that's probably very competitive.

    b) you need to have the GRE. Do you have the GRE? It's a test for graduates.

    c) The SLC only gives loans for British courses as far as I am aware, AND only undergraduate degrees. I hope you're not expecting to get a loan to fund a British MA, because in that case you're in trouble on both fronts.
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    no idea
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    All I can say is, that if you can attend both, then choose New York. If you like the New York vibe like I do, then Im sure you will get a great experience out of it.
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    If you have the money then go to New York for the experience, but judging by the questions I doubt you do
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    I have a brother who is studying in the US at the moment. You can work on-campus and there are lots of part-time jobs going. Last year he worked in the Financial Aid office as an admin type person and this year he is working in Admissions in a similar role. The main issue is that to get the student visa to get over there in the first place, you need to be able to prove with bank statements that you can afford the fees and living costs so any on-campus work would just be for pocket money and not essential.
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    Hi

    Thanks everyone

    “course fees are astronomical in the US”

    That’s what I thought.

    “you don't even need a Masters to do a PhD, I believe, so they're not viewed very highly”

    Yes, a friend did a PhD without an MA. But an MA is still worth doing in my case, I believe (but I won’t bore you with all the details). But MAs aren’t viewed very highly? Is that true?

    “Do you have the GRE? It's a test for graduates.”

    No. I’ve been offered a place on the basis of work and other related experience. But I don’t have a first degree.

    So what’s a GRE?

    “The SLC only gives loans for British courses as far as I am aware, AND only undergraduate degrees”.


    Well, I have savings but was hoping for a loan as well. I don’t think my savings will stretch to US fees. Interesting to know a foreign student can work on campus in the US, and there are opportunities to work on campus. Thanks for that tip.

    Thanks!
 
 
 

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