Why do people say "your first year doesn't count"?

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sil3nt_cha0s
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It was said to me on the UCL and York open days. They were like "yeah, your first year doesn't count, so just have fun and you only need like 40% to pass".

This is such a wrong attitude to take. Why are you even at university if you're hardly gonna try in your first year?

So, after that ranting, my question is - how do you know whether you first year "counts" and when should I definitely be trying my hardest?
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username239687
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I didn't try my first year. I drank a lot and put in little effort. I have a resit :mmm:
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Renal
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Because there's so much more to university than academia...
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Drewski
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(Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
It was said to me on the UCL and York open days. They were like "yeah, your first year doesn't count, so just have fun and you only need like 40% to pass".

This is such a wrong attitude to take. Why are you even at university if you're hardly gonna try in your first year?

So, after that ranting, my question is - how do you know whether you first year "counts" and when should I definitely be trying my hardest?

9 times out of 10, your first year is to get you into the 'university way of studying' as it's a shock to the system after As and A2s. By 'not counting' they mean it has no effect on your degree classification, other than allowing you to continue studying.



And now that the serious answer is out of the way, allow the jokes to continue.
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Beam...
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in most unis its not put towards your degree all you have to do is pass to stay on the course...
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Lell
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It does count in that it sets you on track for the final two years (ie you gain knowledge which will be useful later) but you don't need to panic as much...have fun but don't forget about your studies. People who do nothing can set themselves at a disadvantage later.
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remiredo
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dunno... but I have heard people say that...
although I think that if you try hard 1st year you'll be more prepared for the 2nd year which according to these people DO count
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sil3nt_cha0s
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(Original post by Renal)
Because there's so much more to university than academia...
the work and social stuff can go hand in hand...it's not like one has to take major precedence over the other.
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ashy
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Well my first year was worth 14% of my degree. For some people that percentage is 0 and all they have to do to progress is pass. So they can do quite badly in the first year and just catch up and it doesn't matter - it doesn't count.
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A<3
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The first year can just be one big doss because you only need 40% to pass but if you don't get good marks then any placement years, or years abroard would be effected. Plus you wouldn't be in the right frame of mind for the second year. It's definately the wrong attitude to take, trust me i've been bad and i regret it
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Kaykiie
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I agree with OP, you are paying around £3225 a year to get your degree, why the hell would you want to scrimp a pass?
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Svenjamin
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People say it doesn't count because it literally doesn't. What you do in first year does NOT affect your final grade at all in most courses. You'll find out if the first year goes towards your final grade at the start of the year, your tutor should be able to let you know. In my course all you had to get was a pass of 40% to get onto 2nd year, although you needed at least 60% if you wanted to do a sandwich year. The weighting of the final grade for my course was 30% 2nd year grade and 70% 3rd year grade, so first year had absolutely 0% influence.

A lot of people take on the attitude that first year is where you do all your crazy uni socialising and then concentrate on grades in 2nd and 3rd year. It may not be the best of ideas to scrape in on 41%, but it's a very good idea to get the crazy partying out of your system before the real work starts. Arguably, first year is the only year you can go out 4 or 5 times a week without it affecting your final degree class.
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sigstuff
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What if you do extremely well in your first year? Could they not put that towards your overall classification so you can take less modules in the other years?
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Nizzay!
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Its a wrong attitude take, by messed up in my first year. Now I have 2 resists to hand in this August. Although it doesn't count (towards final degree), I wish I did better so I can see myself how I will stack up for next year.
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sil3nt_cha0s
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(Original post by Lell)
It does count in that it sets you on track for the final two years (ie you gain knowledge which will be useful later) but you don't need to panic as much...have fun but don't forget about your studies. People who do nothing can set themselves at a disadvantage later.
Yeah, I want to get off to the correct start academically
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CapturedSoul
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Although the first two terms didn't count towards our final grade, it did help us to get used to the expected essay-writing style. And in the third term we had to do two essays which will count towards the final grade.
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1721
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why do people say it doesnt count?


....maybe because it doesnt count?
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taheki
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Just don't let your studies completely eclipse your social life. The first year is probably the best year to try and get a healthy balance. In later years you may not be able to achieve that, as workload increases.
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frenchcat53
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I've heard that the first year puts everyone on the same page so everyone has the same knowledge. Seeing as the people on the course will know more about different aspects a lot of the time.
Also it doesn't make up as much of your grade.
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fire2burn
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(Original post by Kaykiie)
I agree with OP, you are paying around £3225 a year to get your degree, why the hell would you want to scrimp a pass?
You're paying for a piece of paper with a grade and some life experience. Seeing as the first year is not contributing to the magical piece of paper you get at the end, you might as well extend more to time to getting life experience since you'll be working your ass of in years 2 + 3.
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