Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    Just wondering, I'd like to move my website to a home server in a couple of years (when I've saved up and obtained a machine capable of being a proper webserver), so I've been thinking of playing around, getting used to the idea and the software and whatever.

    I would like to ask: I heard that you can do it without a static IP address, if you have such-and-such a program installed (and a domain name). What is that program?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Your router will probably have a setting which updates your current IP to dyndns.org or a similar service - this saves installing anything on your server as all the IP translation happens in the router itself.

    I'm not sure if there's a charge to use your own domain with dyndns, and if there is it may be more cost effective to get a static IP from your provider instead. Otherwise you can use a subdomain which is free - and there are loads to choose from.

    Have a mess around with some server software you can run on your main rig before you buy anything!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It depends very much on the type of website; care to fill us in more?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by original-nuttah)
    It depends very much on the type of website; care to fill us in more?
    Click the hacker symbol in my signature.

    The website is there, I was just thinking about serving it from home once the next two-year deal ends (in 2012 or so).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by munkie)
    Your router will probably have a setting which updates your current IP to dyndns.org or a similar service - this saves installing anything on your server as all the IP translation happens in the router itself.

    I'm not sure if there's a charge to use your own domain with dyndns, and if there is it may be more cost effective to get a static IP from your provider instead. Otherwise you can use a subdomain which is free - and there are loads to choose from.

    Have a mess around with some server software you can run on your main rig before you buy anything!!
    I've been playing with Apache on my laptop. I'll get a Server 2003/2008 box sorted out and go that way, with Apache.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by original-nuttah)
    It depends very much on the type of website; care to fill us in more?
    No it doesn't.. I doubt hes going to have high demanding php scripts or databases.


    Anyway you could try XAMP but thats a real fiddle for domains, etc. Failing that you could just do it normally with cpanel, etc
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    For performance, I'd stick a lightweight Linux distro on, and installing Apache with PHP modules and MySQL is still a doddle really.

    You don't need a high-end server; just be sure to get some decent firewall software installed on network and application layer, especially if you're going to host a site for "hacking", as you're bound to come across at least 1 botnet trying to DDoS you.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    You don't need a high-end server; just be sure to get some decent firewall software installed on network and application layer, especially if you're going to host a site for "hacking", as you're bound to come across at least 1 botnet trying to DDoS you.
    This.

    You'll probably want a (correctly configured) hardware firewall such as a Cisco PIX or ASA. Although on a home connection, you could get DoS'd, let alone DDoS'd.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    i have had 2003 and 2008 and they both have advantages and disadvantages, the 2008 version, it is very secure i think and it is very simular to Vista but 2003 is very very good and i enjoyed using it, i did miss php tho because these obviously cannot support it and they only use asp, so i would normally have to try and make it understand php, but i cud never get it to use mysql, Linux Fedora is a nice server, and very secure i thought...
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stringer987)
    i have had 2003 and 2008 and they both have advantages and disadvantages, the 2008 version, it is very secure i think and it is very simular to Vista but 2003 is very very good and i enjoyed using it, i did miss php tho because these obviously cannot support it and they only use asp, so i would normally have to try and make it understand php, but i cud never get it to use mysql, Linux Fedora is a nice server, and very secure i thought...
    Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 can definitely support the use of PHP with either Apache or IIS.

    Both OS' also fully support MySQL.

    I wouldn't argue much about how secure each OS is, but Linux (as a general) has been proven time and time again to be less prone to security flaws, probably due to its open-source nature.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008 can definitely support the use of PHP with either Apache or IIS.

    Both OS' also fully support MySQL.

    I wouldn't argue much about how secure each OS is, but Linux (as a general) has been proven time and time again to be less prone to security flaws, probably due to its open-source nature.
    Yeh i no they can support it but u have to go messing around putting files in c:/windows/system32 and then change the isapi filters within IIS but i never got mysql working, but i done this by dowloading mysql then changing the settings to try and get it to work and it never did!! so i kinda gave up but if they were inbuild it wud be an fantastic OS
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stringer987)
    Yeh i no they can support it but u have to go messing around putting files in c:/windows/system32 and then change the isapi filters within IIS but i never got mysql working, but i done this by dowloading mysql then changing the settings to try and get it to work and it never did!! so i kinda gave up but if they were inbuild it wud be an fantastic OS
    Ahh well that's why I would've stuck to Apache, rather than IIS (and d/c'd from the net then turned UAC off before installing the lot); less fiddling about.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Whoever thought of the idea for UAC should be shot!! its an awful idea!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It's an excellent idea, but an appalling implementation.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd take a look at Lifehacker that's a fairly simple way to setup a Windows web server in your bedroom. At the bottom of that tutorial there are links to assigning a domain name to your home web server and accessing the server behind a firewall and proxy.

    Google really is your friend, there are many tutorials out there which explain step by step to setting up your own Windows or Linux web servers.

    Hope this helps.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not entirely convinced that you'll need a static ip address - if it's just you playing around with apache then surely you can just point your browser to 127.0.0.1 to access your website? If, however, you are actually trying to host something for others to access then take a look at this: http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/dynamic.html
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tobycs)
    No it doesn't.. I doubt hes going to have high demanding php scripts or databases.


    Anyway you could try XAMP but thats a real fiddle for domains, etc. Failing that you could just do it normally with cpanel, etc
    Yes it does; if he's going to make a BitTorrent tracker he'll need BT tracker software such as TBDev. If he's not going to be making a BT tracker, then he doesn't need TBDev, does he? No, because it depends on the type of website.

    Whoever thought of the idea for UAC should be shot!! its an awful idea!
    You can always just disable it.
    • TSR Group Staff
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Group Staff
    Back on the IP thing, most modern routers will support Dynamic DNS, and you can get a free account with dyndns.com, which will allow you to have a personal subdomain on one of DynDNS's domain names (there's a drop-down list of these, so you can pick your favourite e.g. serveftp.org, and then add your own name to the prefix e.g. joebloggs.serveftp.org). Functionally this works in exactly the same way as a standard domain, you can use it for SSH, FTP, HTTP(S), and any other service you care to name. Obviously you can't add more subdomains of your own, but pretty much everything else will work.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    Thanks everyone. It's not a hacking website I run, just silly collection of pages. I'm renovating it at the moment (my excuse for using Apache right now - I'm using it to test the site locally).

    As for what I said about a server box - no, I don't want a big powerful machine, but I want a machine that's separate from my main machine so if it's attacked, I haven't anything to worry about. I thought Server 2003 just because I have a copy here... but I don't suppose it would be too painful to set up a Debian box to serve the site.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stringer987)
    Whoever thought of the idea for UAC should be shot!! its an awful idea!
    Well, both Mac and Linux ask for passwords whenever you want to do something in a protected area. Windows users complain just when it's a continue button.

    And for the OP, why host your site at home? You'll have to leave your computer on 24/7. And I just looked at your site... it should not exist on the internet.
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.