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    I'm 19 and was diagnosed with a mild form of Autism called 'Asperger's Syndrome' when i was 15. Due to the autism I often can't read body language or understand certain jokes and lack common sense. I also find it pretty difficult to approach people too. Often when they say something not meaning much I often take it seriously and it could bother me for hours.

    Can anyone help out with how to read body language and pick up social cues? You might want to look up information about autism to fully understand about how I take things that people say.
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    isn't it a little late to be diagnosed at 15? i thought they diagnosed much earlier than teenage years
    anyway, body language is a difficult one i think - i certainly don't take much notice when it comes to body language
    just be awear of the tone and manner in which people speak

    at the end of the day, people can take you or leave you

    i'm questioning if this is a troll - you don't come across as aspergic - but am giving you the benifit of the doubt
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    I also thought 15 was quite late to be diagnosed, I'm not sure why it took people so long to notice it in me. Most of the other autistic people i know were diagnosed a lot younger. even the teachers in my primary school never knew about it, I was told that the reason is they didn't really know much about autism until recently.
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    my friend got diagnosed at 15/16 - but yeah i agree its is quite late.
    'i'm questioning if this is a troll - you don't come across as aspergic - but am giving you the benifit of the doubt' Autism can come in many different form. ranging from very mild to quite severe.

    As for looking for signs of emotion and body language, is sarcasm an issue for you? When im with my friend, and i say somthing sarcastic, she takes it seriously, but i just explain to her that i was joking and no harm was meant.
    Listen to the level and tone of their voice - this should help you out
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    (Original post by neigh)
    isn't it a little late to be diagnosed at 15? i thought they diagnosed much earlier than teenage years
    anyway, body language is a difficult one i think - i certainly don't take much notice when it comes to body language
    just be awear of the tone and manner in which people speak

    at the end of the day, people can take you or leave you

    i'm questioning if this is a troll - you don't come across as aspergic - but am giving you the benifit of the doubt
    Aspergers is generally diagnosed in the teenage years. It is much milder than "full blown" autism which is typically diagnosed in the early years.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Aspergers is generally diagnosed in the teenage years. It is much milder than "full blown" autism which is typically diagnosed in the early years.
    i know autism is diagnosed before the age of 3 but i didn't realise aspergers was usually diagnosed later...interesting
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    Maybe the easiest thing would be to learn common body language and 'figures of speech' off by heart? Like if you get someone close to you like a family member to explain every time they say something or make a gesture you don't quite get, and then you could remember it for next time you see it.
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    I have VERY mild Asperger's...
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    Wow, I'm really interested in different forms of Autism and, as I'm sure you already know, you're not alone in this... A lot of Asperger's sufferers particularly tend to be isolated or feel independent from the rest of the world, as their brains work at a faster pace than other peoples'.

    This is going to sound like a rubbish source of information (and it's not my only one - my mum works in a school with chilren with Autism) but Carla from 'Waterloo Road' is a good example of an older autistic sufferer and she embodies the traits you're describing.

    As someone said before, the best thing to do is to ask someone to clarify what they mean if they you use an expression that you don't understand. And in terms of body language, I'd say it's not really something that can be taught - most definitely not via the internet - and so I'd advise asking a relative or close friend, or even buying a book explaining the possible meaning of hand/leg/eye movements, etc.

    I hope that helps - quote me or PM me if you'd like any further advice/help/conversation
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    (Original post by learner_dancer)
    I have VERY mild Asperger's...
    So you're basically just a normal teenager?
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    i'm an 18yr girl and i also have aspergers, as does my older boyfriend. i know its not easy with picking things up, the best help would be for someone to give you a hand with picking up on things when you're out and about. like explaining etc. my boyfriend and i have found the most effective thing has been mimiking other people : )
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    (Original post by neigh)
    isn't it a little late to be diagnosed at 15? i thought they diagnosed much earlier than teenage years
    anyway, body language is a difficult one i think - i certainly don't take much notice when it comes to body language
    just be awear of the tone and manner in which people speak

    at the end of the day, people can take you or leave you

    i'm questioning if this is a troll - you don't come across as aspergic - but am giving you the benifit of the doubt
    how would you know if they came across as aspergic if you know nothing about it?
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    (Original post by dml190)
    I'm 19 and was diagnosed with a mild form of Autism called 'Asperger's Syndrome' when i was 15. Due to the autism I often can't read body language or understand certain jokes and lack common sense. I also find it pretty difficult to approach people too. Often when they say something not meaning much I often take it seriously and it could bother me for hours.

    Can anyone help out with how to read body language and pick up social cues? You might want to look up information about autism to fully understand about how I take things that people say.
    It's difficult to teach someone how to read body-language or things like that - a lot more difficult than it is to learn. Sure, I could tell you that if someone acts relaxed around you then they trust you, or if they don't look you straight in the eye when they're talking to you that they can't be trusted, but the things that you can pick up on if you learn are fare more delicate, and the details you use to deduce them are far finer. If you want to learn, then your best bet would be to go somewhere where you're not going to be recognized, and spend some time watching people and communicating with them.

    Don't interpret this wrong, but I always thought it was in the nature of Asperger syndrome not to be able to learn these things - like a mental block which simply disabled that part of the brain function. Am I wrong?
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    I always wonder whether I have something wrong with me. My nephew has autism, my uncle has OCD, I think my mum might have abit of OCD. I feel like there is part of me that is broken. I isolate myself even though I am able to socialise (like i put this this thread... http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=964407 ). I definitely suffer from trichotillomania. I've self diagnosed myself with some other things too but I don't have any strong cases for them. I know I have mental issues though.
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    (Original post by sheepy18)
    how would you know if they came across as aspergic if you know nothing about it?
    where'd you get that from?
    how do you know what i do or don't know???...
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    Those people who are suggesting that only children can be diagnosed autistic or AS are completely missing a point as I know plenty of people have not been diagnosed until their 40s and I didn't find out I was on the spectrum until I was 23.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    It's difficult to teach someone how to read body-language or things like that - a lot more difficult than it is to learn. Sure, I could tell you that if someone acts relaxed around you then they trust you, or if they don't look you straight in the eye when they're talking to you that they can't be trusted, but the things that you can pick up on if you learn are fare more delicate, and the details you use to deduce them are far finer. If you want to learn, then your best bet would be to go somewhere where you're not going to be recognized, and spend some time watching people and communicating with them.

    Don't interpret this wrong, but I always thought it was in the nature of Asperger syndrome not to be able to learn these things - like a mental block which simply disabled that part of the brain function. Am I wrong?
    You're not totally wrong, i think there is something wrong with that part of my brain which makes it more difficult for me to pick up tone and body language. i think the more severe the autism is, the less likely you would be able to learn or pick them things up.
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    (Original post by dml190)
    You're not totally wrong, i think there is something wrong with that part of my brain which makes it more difficult for me to pick up tone and body language. i think the more severe the autism is, the less likely you would be able to learn or pick them things up.
    Did you think of talking to a doctor, to see if it's possible? Someone who is actually an expert on autism?
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Did you think of talking to a doctor, to see if it's possible? Someone who is actually an expert on autism?
    Good point. Although I haven't thought of talking to a doctor about it, the reason is that when I was told by the doctor in the past she said it's 'more difficult' to pick up the social cues and read body language and tone and said you will eventually pick them up rather than saying it was not possible to manage it, so i assumed that it meant it was possible. I just haven't really gripped it yet.
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    My little brother has classic autism, textbook case. He got diagnosed when he was 15. What makes it worse is that at least three people had suspicions he might have it (including his head teacher) and never did anything about it. We only got a diagnosis because our mother pushed for it. Now it's been queried that I may have Aspergers and not just because i'm still trying to get my head round the kettle/pot black metaphor (I have a black kettle :/).

    neigh, there's no way you can infer any disorder from one post on the internet.

    Dml, you can get books on communication and social cues, maybe they'll help or get a friend to explain things to you
 
 
 
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