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Should teachers be allowed to hit pupils? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should teachers be allowed to hit pupils?
    No
    96
    52.17%
    Yes
    76
    41.30%
    Undecided
    12
    6.52%

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    Definitely not, in my eyes. I'm massively against violence. If I had a child at school, and the teacher hit them, they would be out of that school instantly.
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    Oops wrong topic, soz.
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    (Original post by hanny_x)
    No no no.
    As a child, I used to go to Mosque for islamic studies and the teachers there used to hit us if we did not learn the stuff correctly. I still remember to this day how traumatic it used to be for me to go there because I knew I was going to get a beating. This was when i was around 6 years old, and I used to not be able to sleep because I'd stay awake all night trying to learn everything. Once, one teacher went really far and my sister came home with red scars all done her back. Psychologically, I think it messed me up...
    Aww hope you're ok...

    Yes, I think it's wrong to hit someone just because they got some questions wrong. But it's punishing those who are badly behaved and the bullies going round beating kids up.
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    No, never. That said, teachers should be able to exclude and expel students more easily. The current system of being allowed to do nothing simply doesn't work.
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    only if i can hit them back
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    Some more research http://www.udel.edu/PR/UDaily/2006/j...ine062006.html

    "Asian kids that shows that their academic achievement is higher and that they have fewer behavior problems than Caucasian students. I thought this might be true in Japan...

    what motivated the Japanese children's behavior, to a large extent, would be the feelings of guilt and empathy--the feelings that “I've hurt somebody else, and I feel responsible for it,” as opposed to calculated decisions of whether or not I'll get caught, with the assumption that if I don't get caught, it's OK to do that.

    In Japanese schools you don't see systematic reward structures or systems based on consequences, as we have in American schools.

    So, in the context of an authority situation where you're going to be punished if you disobey, you don't disobey, because somebody's going to be watching you and you'll be punished. But, remove that constant monitoring and there's not a good reason why not to disobey in many American schools.

    when we asked how many kids were suspended, principals said, “We do not understand that concept in American schools. Why would you send a kid home if your purpose is to educate?”

    Culturally, when you act out in Japanese society, you bring shame to your family"

    So punishment kinda works - but by not focusing on punishment itself as the sole answer to solve the problem but also parents raising their kids to think that it's wrong to hurt other people feelings rather than go 'I won't do that beacuse I will get punished'.
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    NOOO!
    The amount of times in my school years that i saw a kid getting shouted out for something they never actually did, this would be very bad!
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    Yes. Restore discipline and the balance of power in the classroom.
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    I think they should be allowed to use the cane, but only in well-defined extreme circumstances (ie, not for forgetting a homework). Some children just think they can get away with anything as there's no deterrerent.
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    Difficult ...

    Some children need a good slap tbh, they are vile and don't know discipline and push and push at the teacher. Getting a good telling off has no effect, a slap on the wrist would really shock them, but then with the current laws that child would sit telling the court how he/she had done nothing wrong and how a teacher had physically attacked them.

    I feel sorry for teachers, unless you are amazing at controlling rude children, lessons with totally fail.

    HOWEVER, if a child gets hit by their teacher... would they go out and hit people that annoy them?
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    (Original post by Cupcakee)
    Difficult ...

    Some children need a good slap tbh, they are vile and don't know discipline and push and push at the teacher. Getting a good telling off has no effect, a slap on the wrist would really shock them, but then with the current laws that child would sit telling the court how he/she had done nothing wrong and how a teacher had physically attacked them.

    I feel sorry for teachers, unless you are amazing at controlling rude children, lessons with totally fail.

    HOWEVER, if a child gets hit by their teacher... would they go out and hit people that annoy them?
    Presumably not if they knew they'd just get hit even harder by their teacher. :p:
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    Of course NOT! It may sound antiquated but violence is never the solution of ANY problem.
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Presumably not if they knew they'd just get hit even harder by their teacher. :p:
    True
    But maybe not just in school.. they might be out and about and somebody annoys them somehow.. they will go wildddddddddd :woo:
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    I actually read this as 'Should teachers be allowed to hit on pupils?'. :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    You think degrading a child is an acceptable and effective way of reforming her/his behaviour?
    Are we not aware now that if a child is raised in an environment where it is physically and emotionally abused it is more likely to go on to commit crime and become long term unemployed? We should concentrate on instilling within children a sense of morality and an awareness that violence is wrong. A teacher in a position of authority who hits a child is undermining this principle.
    Don't be so shockingly stupid. This argument has been used by brainless liberals for decades...and where has it left us? In a loathsome culture of youth delinquency.

    A teacher using restrained and reasonable corporal punishment does not in any way constitute 'emotional and physical' abuse in the nefarious sense in which you mean it. A quick, painful use of a cane for instance will hopefully demonstrate the error of a child's ways - it is also a way of using fear as a deterrent. Fear is used as a deterrent in our adult world as well - a fear of incarceration.
    The cane or slipper or whatever was used for years, including upon my father's generation, and there's no visible trauma in the older generations --- indeed, mental illness has actually risen in recent years.

    People here who go to private schools cannot in any real way comment upon this issue (I don't know whether you did or not). They wont have experienced the trials many teachers undergo when faced with a class of thirty rowdy children, with perhaps four or five nasty, aggressive kids in their midst. Teachers are routinely bullied and intimidated. Bring back the cane, I say!
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    (Original post by LurkerintheDark)
    Don't be so shockingly stupid. This argument has been used by brainless liberals for decades...and where has it left us? In a loathsome culture of youth delinquency.

    A teacher using restrained and reasonable corporal punishment does not in any way constitute 'emotional and physical' abuse in the nefarious sense in which you mean it. A quick, painful use of a cane for instance will hopefully demonstrate the error of a child's ways - it is also a way of using fear as a deterrent. Fear is used as a deterrent in our adult world as well - a fear of incarceration.
    The cane or slipper or whatever was used for years, including upon my father's generation, and there's no visible trauma in the older generations --- indeed, mental illness has actually risen in recent years.

    People here who go to private schools cannot in any real way comment upon this issue (I don't know whether you did or not). They wont have experienced the trials many teachers undergo when faced with a class of thirty rowdy children, with perhaps four or five nasty, aggressive kids in their midst. Teachers are routinely bullied and intimidated. Bring back the cane, I say!
    I have to agree with this. People often do not realise the extent of the awful behaviour of some children, who know they can do anything without getting into trouble. After all, what power does a teacher have over them? Some children do not want to be instilled with a sense of morality.
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    Yes, when needed..
    Only under serious circumstances though
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    (Original post by Pawsies)
    yes.


    I find it interesting how the people who agree with smacking are always the ones who have been hit as a child.
    Violence breeds violence :spank:
    You'd seriously take money away from a kid? What if the kid doesn't have its own money? I didn't have my own unless it was birthday money or whatever until I got a job. There's just no sense in that.

    Smacking a kid for misbehaving isn't violence to me. My parents aren't violent and neither am I. You don't need to hit hard at all for the message to sink in, it's more of a shock tactic. Rather that than the whole 'naughty step' rubbish, I honestly don't see how that works, the only reason the kid behaves is so that it doesn't have to be bored stiff for X amount of minutes, not because they've learnt their lesson.
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    (Original post by Zastrugi)
    Smacking a kid for misbehaving isn't violence to me. My parents aren't violent and neither am I. You don't need to hit hard at all for the message to sink in, it's more of a shock tactic. Rather that than the whole 'naughty step' rubbish, I honestly don't see how that works, the only reason the kid behaves is so that it doesn't have to be bored stiff for X amount of minutes, not because they've learnt their lesson.
    What message though?
    I was severely abused as a child, and I'm against violence of any kind under any circumstance.
    Any future child of my own is going to get an upbringing free from that (some might consider it a 'hippy' upbringing), where they are free to do as they please, but taught from a very young age to be very aware of the consequences of their actions.
    It may not work, but I know that I'll be comfortable and happy about it.
    I'd rather the message that sank in to my child were:

    'If I call Jimmy an ugly loser, it could upset him/affect his self-confidence' (increasing the explanation with age)

    than:

    'Hitting Jimmy = Pain for me. Must not hit Jimmy'.

    If a message is going to sink in, it needs to be worth something. Pain and fear are NOT good ways of bringing up a child.

    Saying that, I also disagree with the 'naughty step' rubbish. Parenting has to be active, and that's the problem. Sitting a child on a naughty step is equally as ineffective as hitting them, because they're being punished without explanation. The problem is that nobody has enough time for their child any more.
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    Only seen page 1 but I dont think hitting should be back especially nor excess force but the teachers should be able to at least be able to not live in fear plus be able to shout back at a student in cetain ways or remove them from a class(I know that does happen but it just annoys pupils)
 
 
 
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