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    Hi all.

    My current computer has just about had it. I am thinking of buying a new one that will hopefully last me through graduate school.

    The thing is - I am buying it in the USA before I come to the UK. Is there anything special I need to add or buy for it (besides a converter?). Any types of programs?

    Any thoughts on brands or styles of PC or Mac? I love the new Macbook Pros (7 hours of battery and an solid shell - nice!) and I think it would do it's job, but the price is killing me. I pretty much just need a reliable computer that I can write my thesis on, go to lectures, write papers, do media projects, run DVDs, and run statistics. Any thoughts? I am pretty computer illiterate.
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    Well, I don't know what kind of a budget you're on, but I'm pretty sold on Sager: http://www.sagernotebook.com/default.php. I would definitely advise against Macs (but of course, I have a pretty strong bias). If you're going to be overseas, though, I think that the general unreliability of the Mac hardware would be a turnoff. So many of my friends have had their screens, hard drives, etc die within the first year of usage, and I think most PC manufacturers use higher-quality internal parts. Plus, they're cheaper to upgrade.

    As for Sager, don't let the "gaming laptop" term fool you - they're not specifically for that, and not so optimized that you can't use them for everyday tasks. My brother got a new 15" model right before he went off to college in Seattle, and it's served him well so far (about 18 months in). If I recall, it was just over $1,000. Mine is by ibuypower (www.ibuypower.com), which was more in the $1,500 range and is a 17", as well as being more suited towards games, but I play more games than him anyways. I've had it for two years now, and I definitely plan to take it across the pond with no qualms about its durability.
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    (Original post by GrahamCracker)
    As for Sager, don't let the "gaming laptop" term fool you - they're not specifically for that, and not so optimized that you can't use them for everyday tasks. My brother got a new 15" model right before he went off to college in Seattle, and it's served him well so far (about 18 months in). If I recall, it was just over $1,000. Mine is by ibuypower (www.ibuypower.com), which was more in the $1,500 range and is a 17", as well as being more suited towards games, but I play more games than him anyways. I've had it for two years now, and I definitely plan to take it across the pond with no qualms about its durability.
    Thanks for your help! I'll look into it.

    ps- what college in Seattle. I am a Seattle-ite. haha. :p:
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    I hope he went to UW. Exchange alumni here. Hehehehe.
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    you can save some money on mac if you are planning to study...you can get even a free i-pod I guess....check their store for detail! http://store.apple.com/uk
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    (Original post by cuckooboy25000)
    you can save some money on mac if you are planning to study...you can get even a free i-pod I guess....check their store for detail! http://store.apple.com/uk
    Yeah - that's the deal I was currently looking at. It's cheaper to buy it in the USA, but it still works out close to 1600 USD which is a bit on the high end for me. I may just bight the bullet and buy it though...
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    You're not actually planning to use it during lectures, are you, OP?
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    You're not actually planning to use it during lectures, are you, OP?
    Enlighten the american please? In the states - it is almost mandatory that you take notes (as well as in many cases audio recordings) of your lectures. I finished undergrad with only not using a computer for notes in I think maybe one or two classes over a four year period. Grad school and law schools in the states usually require them for classwork.
    :confused:

    In the UK is it considered to be very rude to do this?
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    I have a mac and love it, but I've had to use quite a few programmes this year which are PC only, so boot camp is a must (and even then it's not guaranteed).

    And yes, it's generally quite annoying to have people tapping away in classes - most of your teaching is likely to be in seminar groups of 10-15 or so, and it can be really distracting in a two-hour class if someone's hammering away at a keyboard. It's more about participation and taking the odd note than copying things down, which is much easier to do with a notepad
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    Unless you have a disability that requires you to use a laptop in classes (in which case most people will be very understanding!), people are more inclined to throw things at your head if you do this (so you may end up disabled as a result anyway...lovely :/ ). Really don't use your laptop to take notes in class; everyone takes notes by hand. The whirring/noise of a laptop fan or the tapping on a keyboard really would be the most annoying thing ever during a lecture.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    Unless you have a disability that requires you to use a laptop in classes (in which case most people will be very understanding!), people are more inclined to throw things at your head if you do this (so you may end up disabled as a result anyway...lovely :/ ). Really don't use your laptop to take notes in class; everyone takes notes by hand. The whirring/noise of a laptop fan or the tapping on a keyboard really would be the most annoying thing ever during a lecture.
    Ok good to know. I think that in the US it has just become accepted that you listen (even in small lectures) and get used to people tapping on the keyboards. But now I know...so that is a plus and I won't make a mistake by showing up to my first lecture with laptop in tow.
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    It's pretty commonplace in my lectures for people to have Laptops... even a few people in tutorials (10-12 people) take them with them, tutors weren't bothered.

    OP: Any new well built laptop will suffice!
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    Ah, now I see where the consensus is anyways. My undergrad college was almost entirely seminars of 15 students or less, and whether or not we could bring our laptops depended entirely upon the teacher. For the few occasional lectures of 45 or so, laptops were pretty universal, but I don't know how your UK school will work (nor do I know how mine will).

    Oh, and as for my brother, he's at Evergreen. Olympia, I know, but pretty close.
 
 
 
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