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Pitbull/Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Watch

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    We rescued a Pitbull/Staffy from Scotland, well actually my sisters home her boyfriend we fear he abused her

    But anyways we've had her since about 3 months old, she's now 6!

    And although she dislikes being picked up and put in the bath, you can tell this by growling and the fact you really shouldn't mess with a pitbull.

    She's the cutest thing ever, really loving kind etc.

    I really hate the fact these intelligent, strong dogs have been used the way they have and are associated with chavs, this is the point I'm trying to make!

    Although she is obessed with playing ball and won't leave you alone and is very stubborn aswell as exceptionally strong i.e she takes you from a walk not the other way around.

    She's the most loving dog ever, with her green eyes and pure muscle, wouldn't trade her for the world! Although I love my Scraggy long haired Jack Russell even more because he's mine
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    And?
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    Do you honestly think I care that you have a dog?
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    What's your point? You train a dog well, of course it's going to behave...
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    Sounds nice, but which is it, pitbull or staffy?
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    (Original post by Gone Revising)
    Sounds nice, but which is it, pitbull or staffy?
    Exactly.
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    Aww bless, are you like 12?
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    I hope it isn't an illegal cross breed. These generally placid animals are well noted for snapping into a violent temperment.
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    It's half and half!

    It can't be illegal otherwise I wouldn't have pet insurance on her now would I?

    Triple what the Jack Russell costs however!
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    If its a Staffy...cool! i have one! they're well cute but the reputation is **** and i could kill the chavs who use them in the wrong way!!!

    If its a pittie...im sorry, but thats an illegal not to mention quite potentially dangerous dog! Ok, i understand you trained your dog well and all this but so have i and i've got a legal dog and i still dont trust him 100%...they're still animals and as pitties have been proven to be dangerous and possibly lethal to people (and they're not great around other dogs either), you risk arrest or possibly being mauled by that very cute, possibly abused stubborn dog.

    brutally honest...which is it??? x
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    (Original post by Donnahh)
    Aww bless, are you like 12?

    No

    But I wish I still was.

    The world is far to confusing at 18!
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    I've read the Dangerous Act 1991 (As Amended)

    The dog isn't specifically bred for fighting as the act states.

    Nor is it a "Pit Bull Terrier" as specifically mentioned in the Act.

    It's a cross bred, so she's absolutely fine, she is always on a lead!
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    Awww I love dogs

    I would be careful though cos Pitbulls are illegal dogs. Honestly, I saw a thing on telly about people having tough dogs and they can be put down by law. Even cross breeds, so be careful

    This might be useful:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6222689.stm
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    (Original post by girlmechanik)
    If its a Staffy...cool! i have one! they're well cute but the reputation is **** and i could kill the chavs who use them in the wrong way!!!

    If its a pittie...im sorry, but thats an illegal not to mention quite potentially dangerous dog! Ok, i understand you trained your dog well and all this but so have i and i've got a legal dog and i still dont trust him 100%...they're still animals and as pitties have been proven to be dangerous and possibly lethal to people (and they're not great around other dogs either), you risk arrest or possibly being mauled by that very cute, possibly abused stubborn dog.

    brutally honest...which is it??? x
    Does that answer your question then?
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    "If a dog injures someone, the owner can be jailed for up to two years."

    Hmmm so what in all honest is the point of damage limitation cover or liability cover on pet insurance

    upto £1,000,000 if you dog bites a person or another dog and is deemed as to be dangerous by the public.

    Seems to me a civil matter not criminal, but it's defined by statute so it is criminal and the insurance is useless
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    (Original post by SomeonecalledJohnny)
    I've read the Dangerous Act 1991 (As Amended)

    The dog isn't specifically bred for fighting as the act states.

    Nor is it a "Pit Bull Terrier" as specifically mentioned in the Act.

    It's a cross bred, so she's absolutely fine, she is always on a lead!
    Being a cross breed doesn't necessarily mean it's ok.

    The Act also cover cross breeds of the above four types of dog. Dangerous dogs are classified by 'type', not by breed label. This means that whether a dog is prohibited under the Act will depend on a judgement about its physical characteristics, and whether they match the description of a prohibited 'type'. This assessment of the physical characteristics is made by a court.
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    eh? I dont get it
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    There is ambiguity there, technically we could say any dog is bred for fighting since they are all derived from wolves!

    I think you'll find that this act was one of great contraversy as I learned in statutory intrepretation.

    This act was rushed though as badly worded piece of legislature as reaction to public reception of these animals, it's only the case law in the future which will ultimately decide the future of this magnificant creatures.

    The Act has been described as a piece of rushed legislation which was an overreaction to a transient public mood.

    "Dempsey (c. 1986 - 2003) was a female American Pit Bull Terrier who was the subject of a high-profile challenge to the British Dangerous Dogs Act 1991. She was owned by Dianne Fanneran and lived in London.
    While being walked one evening in April 1992, muzzled and kept on a lead in accordance with the law, she began acting sick and her muzzle was removed, allegedly to allow her to vomit.
    Two passing police officers noted the unmuzzled dog, and charged the caretaker under the Dangerous Dogs Act. Three months later, at Ealing Magistrates' Court, Dempsey was ordered to be euthanised for failing to be muzzled in a public place.
    Appeals took three years before the Crown Court, the High Court and the House of Lords, during which time the media covered the story, leading activist Brigitte Bardot to offer the dog sanctuary at her home in France, to avoid British law.
    The case was dismissed in November 1995 on a legal technicality, since that Dempsey's owner — who had not been involved in, nor originally told about, the unmuzzling incident, had not been informed about prior to the convening of the first hearing.
    Dempsey was reprieved, and died at the age of 17 in 2003."

    It's disgusting really how you treat these creatures.

    And the Police are *******s!

    Go fight real crimes!
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    (Original post by SomeonecalledJohnny)
    There is ambiguity there, technically we could say any dog is bred for fighting since they are all derived from wolves!

    I think you'll find that this act was one of great contraversy as I learned in statutory intrepretation.

    This act was rushed though as badly worded piece of legislature as reaction to public reception of these animals, it's only the case law in the future which will ultimately decide the future of this magnificant creatures.

    The Act has been described as a piece of rushed legislation which was an overreaction to a transient public mood.

    "Dempsey (c. 1986 - 2003) was a female American Pit Bull Terrier who was the subject of a high-profile challenge to the British Dangerous Dogs Act 1991. She was owned by Dianne Fanneran and lived in London.
    While being walked one evening in April 1992, muzzled and kept on a lead in accordance with the law, she began acting sick and her muzzle was removed, allegedly to allow her to vomit.
    Two passing police officers noted the unmuzzled dog, and charged the caretaker under the Dangerous Dogs Act. Three months later, at Ealing Magistrates' Court, Dempsey was ordered to be euthanised for failing to be muzzled in a public place.
    Appeals took three years before the Crown Court, the High Court and the House of Lords, during which time the media covered the story, leading activist Brigitte Bardot to offer the dog sanctuary at her home in France, to avoid British law.
    The case was dismissed in November 1995 on a legal technicality, since that Dempsey's owner — who had not been involved in, nor originally told about, the unmuzzling incident, had not been informed about prior to the convening of the first hearing.
    Dempsey was reprieved, and died at the age of 17 in 2003."

    It's disgusting really how you treat these creatures.

    And the Police are *******s!

    Go fight real crimes!
    so a dog biting a child isnt a crime???? WTF?????!!!!!! and i know its not directly linked to this
    quote...but still, dangerous dogs should be off the streets!

    and ****! my Staff looks like a pittie because of his build...does that mean he could potentially be removed because of the way he looks even if we have proof hes legally Staffy? x
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    (Original post by SomeonecalledJohnny)
    I've read the Dangerous Act 1991 (As Amended)

    The dog isn't specifically bred for fighting as the act states.

    Nor is it a "Pit Bull Terrier" as specifically mentioned in the Act.

    It's a cross bred, so she's absolutely fine, she is always on a lead!
    It doesn't matter whether you mean to fight your dog or not, but any pitbull-type dog can be euthanised if a dog warden decides it's a pitbull-type. Part pit or not, it'll be deemed a dangerous dog (A lot of people find it difficult to distinguish between staffs and pits over here, completely innocent breeds are sometimes deemed pibull-type). You don't want to go telling people when you're out with her that she's part pitbull, because some people may report you...

    I once had a (stray) part pitbull brought into where I work, and it was the loveliest dog I've ever had to look after, she was fantastic, but when the dog warden came to collect her, he sent her to doggy heaven... :sad:
 
 
 
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