Turn on thread page Beta

Can I take two degrees - one after another? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am at college and I have just finished the IB, where my Highers were English, French and History. I received good grades for them and I am considering applying this year for an English degree, possibly combined with French or History.

    However, I am also really interested in the sciences, although it is harder for me to learn them, and I love hospitals and exploring how the body works, and so I was also considering a degree in Medicine. I also obviously don't have the Biology/Chemistry/Maths needed to pursue a medical course, which is why I don't think I can do a Medicine degree now, but I am considering the idea of doing an English degree first, followed by a Medicine degree (where I would do a 'fast-track year' at the uni, or whatever they are called, in order to get up to science A level standard).

    I know this is a sort of 'why don't you do 3 years of one of these degrees and see then if I want to do another', but before I apply for anything I want to see if it's possible (especially in a student finance view?), and what other options I could pursue. I really enjoy learning, and so it's not all about getting the best job possible - I already have a job at my mum's business which I can go back to anytime, plus I teach piano. I would have to say English is probably my passion, but at the same time I'm fascinated with everything related to Medicine!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarafina)
    I am at college and I have just finished the IB, where my Highers were English, French and History. I received good grades for them and I am considering applying this year for an English degree, possibly combined with French or History.

    However, I am also really interested in the sciences, although it is harder for me to learn them, and I love hospitals and exploring how the body works, and so I was also considering a degree in Medicine. I also obviously don't have the Biology/Chemistry/Maths needed to pursue a medical course, which is why I don't think I can do a Medicine degree now, but I am considering the idea of doing an English degree first, followed by a Medicine degree (where I would do a 'fast-track year' at the uni, or whatever they are called, in order to get up to science A level standard).

    I know this is a sort of 'why don't you do 3 years of one of these degrees and see then if I want to do another', but before I apply for anything I want to see if it's possible (especially in a student finance view?), and what other options I could pursue. I really enjoy learning, and so it's not all about getting the best job possible - I already have a job at my mum's business which I can go back to anytime, plus I teach piano. I would have to say English is probably my passion, but at the same time I'm fascinated with everything related to Medicine!

    If you have the money to finance your plans, go for it. Bear in mind they'll probably change over the years.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by booraad)
    If you have the money to finance your plans, go for it. Bear in mind they'll probably change over the years.
    Do you know whether I will still be able to qualify for student finance for the second degree, or will I have to pay up front?

    (I haven't applied for student finance at all, as of yet - I'm a bit clueless:o:)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarafina)
    Do you know whether I will still be able to qualify for student finance for the second degree, or will I have to pay up front?

    (I haven't applied for student finance at all, as of yet - I'm a bit clueless:o:)
    Student finance only fund one degree.
    You'd have to pay the second on yourself.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    As above, if you want to do more than one degree you will have to fund the second yourself.
    However, if it was a medical degree, or nursing, I think you may get some financial assistance. Other than that, unless things change you will have to pay for the second degree yourself.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Why not do an English Degree, then go into Graduate entry medicine? You can go into graduate entry medicine with an english degree.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I'm pretty sure graduate entry medicine only applies to science degrees?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by screenager2004)
    Why not do an English Degree, then go into Graduate entry medicine? You can go into graduate entry medicine with an english degree.
    Is that possible? Could you tell me a little more about this; what level is 'graduate entry' medicine? Is it like doing a second undergraduate degree or what, and will I still do a fast-track beforehand? Thanks
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarafina)
    Do you know whether I will still be able to qualify for student finance for the second degree, or will I have to pay up front?

    (I haven't applied for student finance at all, as of yet - I'm a bit clueless:o:)
    That's the thing, a 2nd degree won't be funded. I think it's only the last 2 years of a graduate entry medicine course that are funded by the NHS. There are also very few universities that accept non-science degrees for this course.

    You really would have to have access to pots of money.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarafina)
    Is that possible? Could you tell me a little more about this; what level is 'graduate entry' medicine? Is it like doing a second undergraduate degree or what, and will I still do a fast-track beforehand? Thanks

    (Original post by xSkyFire)
    I'm pretty sure graduate entry medicine only applies to science degrees?

    Nope, some universities accept degrees in any discipline.

    Most unis only want graduates from scientific disciplines, but many unis accept any subject: nottingham is one exampleo ff the top o' my head - http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/mhs/gem/students/index.php

    You can go in with a strong 2.1/1st in anything, History and Politics, Law, French.... you name it.

    It's technically Post graduate, because you need a degree to get onto the course, I'm pretty sure its NHS funded (don't hold me to that).

    It's extremely competitive though. Much more competitive than normal undergraduate entry into a medicine degree. You'd have more success just re doing your A levels and taking biology etc.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarafina)
    Is that possible? Could you tell me a little more about this; what level is 'graduate entry' medicine? Is it like doing a second undergraduate degree or what, and will I still do a fast-track beforehand? Thanks
    Most required a science degree closely related to, or linking to medicine such as Biological sciences, physiology etc. English im sure will not be considered appropriate at many Universities.

    Graduate entry medicine is basically a 4 year medicine degree (instead of 5 or more) for people who already have an undergraduate degree.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you very much anyway everybody At least I know I have some options, even though it looks like I would need a bucket load of money before I could do it...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am at college and I have just finished the IB, where my Highers were English, French and History. I received good grades for them and I am considering applying this year for an English degree, possibly combined with French or History.

    However, I am also really interested in the sciences, although it is harder for me to learn them, and I love hospitals and exploring how the body works, and so I was also considering a degree in Medicine. I also obviously don't have the Biology/Chemistry/Maths needed to pursue a medical course, which is why I don't think I can do a Medicine degree now, but I am considering the idea of doing an English degree first, followed by a Medicine degree (where I would do a 'fast-track year' at the uni, or whatever they are called, in order to get up to science A level standard).

    I know this is a sort of 'why don't you do 3 years of one of these degrees and see then if I want to do another', but before I apply for anything I want to see if it's possible (especially in a student finance view?), and what other options I could pursue. I really enjoy learning, and so it's not all about getting the best job possible - I already have a job at my mum's business which I can go back to anytime, plus I teach piano. I would have to say English is probably my passion, but at the same time I'm fascinated with everything related to Medicine!
    I'm thinking of doing something very similar. I'm starting Uni in September to do a BA in Journalism but I'm thinking about doing an English literature and linguistics BA afterward. I love English and employers like to see a solid base (ie. English) with journalism eventhough experience is vital.
 
 
 
The home of Results and Clearing

1,470

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.