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What can I learn if I have acess to lots of MRI, CAT, PET scan films? watch

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    Hiya,

    I've been put to work or learn at the radiology centre. The director said that I can take a look at all the patient slides but they dont make sense to me ( at least not yet). I have access to all patient history, MRI, PET, CT scans, also a write up on what the doctors noticed. This seems to be a great learning opportunity but the radio director and staff are quite busy and dont have time to teach me things, plus Im too shy and dont want to bother them.

    Just out of interest, how can I take advantage of these slides and what can I learn from them without being taught anything yet
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    Nothing. This is not what you're on work experience to find out about.
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    Pretty much nothing - unless you know what you're looking at, you can't deduce what EXACTLY is wrong and how it will affect the afflicted. Generally speaking - people go to medical school to learn this. Advice : gt someone to explain it to you and try to remember something cool or significant to yourself for laters.
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    Pretty much nothing - unless you know what you're looking at, you can't deduce what EXACTLY is wrong and how it will affect the afflicted. Generally speaking - people go to medical school to learn this. Advice : gt someone to explain it to you and try to remember something cool or significant to yourself for laters.
    I have access to the doctors report that says what diseases were found and which areas, is there anything i could do with the info?
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    (Original post by appletree_1)
    I have access to the doctors report that says what diseases were found and which areas, is there anything i could do with the info?
    Not easily.
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    Read it, if it makes no sense - then no. If it all makes perfect sense to you and you can advise on treatment plans etc...- skip medical school and pay an official in a corrupt country for registration.
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    Thing is, that isn't teaching material, its work material written by people who know what they're on about for other people who know what they're on about. The thing you need to learn is process, what happens when patients come in, who they're seen by and why and how they move through the whole hospital system. Radiology is at a very late stage in this process and you don't want to get into the habit of seeing it as the Magic Answer Machine without learning how hospitals work first.
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    Yep Ive spent two years learning medicine and I cant competently read one yet. Properly interpreting these kind of things takes years of learning and experience. What you can get is limited especially without a textbook or something. I guess some of the more interesting cases might be worth taking a look at to see whats going on there...
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    importance of these diagnostic tests?? why they are used? even though all of them are used for diagnosing certain diseases why is one test preferred over the other?? role of radiologists in this?? etc etc, there are actually loads of things you can learn from this.
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    learn how the cons/reg take their coffee.
    then get in there
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    (Original post by martin101)
    Yep Ive spent two years learning medicine and I cant competently read one yet. Properly interpreting these kind of things takes years of learning and experience. What you can get is limited especially without a textbook or something. I guess some of the more interesting cases might be worth taking a look at to see whats going on there...
    Unless you do radiology you probably won't ever be too good at interpreting these things. I'm reasonable at interpreting CT heads but othe than
    that my knowledge is basic
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    All the people who are saying 'you can learn nothing' are absolute morons. Anyone with Gray's Anatomy can start learning detailed radiographic anatomy. It's not hard.

    In terms of specific pathologies you could quite happily look up the common radiographic signs of each and try and identify them on radiographs. Once again, not hard.

    Edit: Also, no-one calls them CAT scans any more, just CT. The 'axial' is standard, and most CT scanners reconstruct in other planes as well.
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    If you have the patients notes, the best place to look to get a more 'understandable' idea of whats wrong with them etc. is to look for the section with letters. Almost any doctor / consultant checking out patient notes would go straight to this (if they are not currently admitted). Unless you are a junior doc and have been lumped with the task of dictating all the discharges

    Most of the diagnostic changes on these radiographic pictures/charts are very subtle and not obvious unless you really know what you are looking for - they are rarely textbook. This is why most consultants will rely on the radiographers report or comments as to where to proceed next.
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    All the people who are saying 'you can learn nothing' are absolute morons. Anyone with Gray's Anatomy can start learning detailed radiographic anatomy. It's not hard.

    In terms of specific pathologies you could quite happily look up the common radiographic signs of each and try and identify them on radiographs. Once again, not hard.

    Edit: Also, no-one calls them CAT scans any more, just CT. The 'axial' is standard, and most CT scanners reconstruct in other planes as well.
    Yes, I'm quite sure you can just quickly learn "Detailed radiographic anatomy" with a copy of Grays. Should only take an evening or two.

    How exactly does it help to look up "Subarachnoid Haemorrhage", "Berry aneurysm" and "Basal cisterns" on their own, even if they do eventually get it? Maybe a total punter could get each condition individually but without a broader preclinical knowledge, its just isolated pub-quiz facts that don't really mean anything at all. And that's with a serious underestimation of how difficult Radiology can be as a specialty, what with human's bloody awkward refusal to do what textbooks say they should.

    Aside from anything else, as has already been said, it isn't their job to develop skills in cod-Radiology, its to gain experience to inform them on coming to medical school or not. Piddling around pretending to be a Radiologist isn't in the job description and doesn't do the OP any favours.
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    All the people who are saying 'you can learn nothing' are absolute morons. Anyone with Gray's Anatomy can start learning detailed radiographic anatomy. It's not hard.

    In terms of specific pathologies you could quite happily look up the common radiographic signs of each and try and identify them on radiographs. Once again, not hard.

    Edit: Also, no-one calls them CAT scans any more, just CT. The 'axial' is standard, and most CT scanners reconstruct in other planes as well.
    if its not hard just by looking at the scan having seen a few before and read one book, then why do we pay for radiologists?
    Why not just do a diploma on 'detailed radiographic anatomy' and get some college kids to do it?
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    if its not hard just by looking at the scan having seen a few before and read one book, then why do we pay for radiologists?
    Why not just do a diploma on 'detailed radiographic anatomy' and get some college kids to do it?
    (Original post by AEH)
    Yes, I'm quite sure you can just quickly learn "Detailed radiographic anatomy" with a copy of Grays. Should only take an evening or two.

    How exactly does it help to look up "Subarachnoid Haemorrhage", "Berry aneurysm" and "Basal cisterns" on their own, even if they do eventually get it? Maybe a total punter could get each condition individually but without a broader preclinical knowledge, its just isolated pub-quiz facts that don't really mean anything at all. And that's with a serious underestimation of how difficult Radiology can be as a specialty, what with human's bloody awkward refusal to do what textbooks say they should.

    Aside from anything else, as has already been said, it isn't their job to develop skills in cod-Radiology, its to gain experience to inform them on coming to medical school or not. Piddling around pretending to be a Radiologist isn't in the job description and doesn't do the OP any favours.
    You're both probably right. It's not like I'm a radiograp......

    Oh wait. Yes I am.
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    You're both probably right. It's not like I'm a radiograp......

    Oh wait. Yes I am.
    Shame your not a radiologist, that way you might be able to interpret that your talking ********
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    Shame your not a radiologist, that way you might be able to interpret that your talking ********
    Shame you can't spell 'you're.'

    You a radiologist?

    Thought not. Jog on pet.
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    I thought the professions allied to medicine were supposed to think that we were complete cocks, not the other way round... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    You're both probably right. It's not like I'm a radiograp......

    Oh wait. Yes I am.
    A radiographer?

    I was going to suggest you might be. It would explain the arrogance and rudeness.
    Most are great at their jobs and entirely civil, but you do get the odd one who gets ideas above his station.

    Yes, you can teach any imbecile to recognise easy fractures or oddities on scans. Yes, you can even force the names for said bones and organs into said imbeciles brain.

    But no, it is not a useful for this person to stare at scans all day.
    If they are a student nurse, radiographer or work experience kid then they should be watching what the radiographers do, and talking to the patients.

    Not sitting in a dark room and trying to memorise films.
 
 
 
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