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What can I learn if I have acess to lots of MRI, CAT, PET scan films? Watch

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    (Original post by Jamie)
    A radiographer?

    I was going to suggest you might be. It would explain the arrogance and rudeness.
    Most are great at their jobs and entirely civil, but you do get the odd one who gets ideas above his station.

    Yes, you can teach any imbecile to recognise easy fractures or oddities on scans. Yes, you can even force the names for said bones and organs into said imbeciles brain.

    But no, it is not a useful for this person to stare at scans all day.
    If they are a student nurse, radiographer or work experience kid then they should be watching what the radiographers do, and talking to the patients.

    Not sitting in a dark room and trying to memorise films.
    Well strictly speaking the arrogance and rudeness was the result of a fair few pints last night.

    Sitting in a dark room? It's not the 1990's you know. Knowledge of CT/MRI anatomy is ridiculously useful, and very easy to teach yourself. The threadstarter says she has time on her hands so what better way to use it?

    Edit: Also, a clinician is calling ME rude and arrogant? :hahaha:

    Pot calling kettle black much?
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    Well strictly speaking the arrogance and rudeness was the result of a fair few pints last night.

    Sitting in a dark room? It's not the 1990's you know. Knowledge of CT/MRI anatomy is ridiculously useful, and very easy to teach yourself. The threadstarter says she has time on her hands so what better way to use it?

    Edit: Also, a clinician is calling ME rude and arrogant?

    Pot calling kettle black much?
    Did you say "teach yourself"!?! If so I'm very interested!!!! please please please explain!!!
    Basically I was accepted to an internship which is now cancelled because of swine flu and I cant get into med wards no more, now I help out with the radio department. Well, I mean in the morning I have to press lift buttons for the hospital, and afternoon at radio, so im trying to make the most out of the opportunity
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    Sorry if I've misunderstood your situation here Appletree, I understood it that you're on work experience to make a UCAS application to medical school this year? If so, that isn't an internship, that's work experience, at least in this system. If its something else, then apologies.

    Otherwise, this is not helping you. I get that its difficult with swine flu and you're trying to make the best of what you've got, which is sensible enough. Believe me, having worked in Admissions, on interviews and with selectors for several years, that what TommyWannabe is suggesting is absolutely not what we want from you. We want you to demonstrate a knowledge of the health service, how it works, where doctors fit into this and what makes you suitable to fill that role. Whenever candidates have talked about some bit of medical knowledge in a supposedly impressive way in an interview, its either sent the panel to sleep or they've made some horrific error in understanding (Sometimes in front of the exact wrong person) and its quite horrible to watch.

    Sorry if I've misunderstood the situation, but that is what medical admissions want. TommyWannabe, if you want to tell us all about your career in Medicine, do feel free.
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    PS Helper
    Things OP could do instead of checking TSR:

    Understanding the IT systems in place, talking to all the health professionals involved - esp the doctors about their roles - even if it means hanging round a hospital canteen at the right hours (also if you're a bellboy/lift operator for the hospital - try to speak to a non harassed looking doctor - go on, be brave...), getting a feel for what parts of your personality fits into said role. Basically - scavenge something that you can talk about "reflecting" on your experiences either in the PS or the interview - and it's not guaranteed to come up - I ended up talking about interpretations and meanings of faeces in classic literature instead in one... Otherwise you can run the risk of wasting your time and only getting a tiny amount of 'GLORY' points. It sounds much more interesting and full of possibilities than my work exp. Where the GP's were too busy to speak and I only got to talk to a few admin staff, a clin. student shadowing and a physiotherapist (who had a fascinating story, but that's aside from the point).

    Leave the stuff you're supposed to learn at med school - for when you get to med school.
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    Shame you can't spell 'you're.'

    You a radiologist?

    Thought not. Jog on pet.
    No I'm not a radiologist, but I have done quite a bit this year as research into radiology as a potential career choice. Maybe a bad idea if all radiographers are like you
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    I have to say that Grays is possibly the worst anatomy textbook I own... I know its practically the anatomists dictionary, but for learning purposes its just not all that helpful IMO. Recommending Grays to someone who just wants to get into the subject is like telling someone who wants to learn English to read a dictionary. Sure if you manage to get from cover to cover without slitting your wrists youll know where things are in the body, but without context its all just meaningless and makes reading it just that much less interesting.

    To the OP youre better off with some functional antomy textbook as at least this will show you how bits relate to the rest of the body.
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    No I'm not a radiologist, but I have done quite a bit this year as research into radiology as a potential career choice. Maybe a bad idea if all radiographers are like you
    they're not, they're generally a nice bunch. If a bit stroppy and possessive.
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    (Original post by appletree_1)
    Hiya,

    I've been put to work or learn at the radiology centre. The director said that I can take a look at all the patient slides but they dont make sense to me ( at least not yet). I have access to all patient history, MRI, PET, CT scans, also a write up on what the doctors noticed. This seems to be a great learning opportunity but the radio director and staff are quite busy and dont have time to teach me things, plus Im too shy and dont want to bother them.

    Just out of interest, how can I take advantage of these slides and what can I learn from them without being taught anything yet
    What stage are you at? If you have enough anatomy to interpret what you are seeing, then ask them if htey have an undergraduate teaching series - these tend to be barn door stuff, or nice normal images but with good clear examples of normal anatomy. Or you could try books like the "Made Easy" series - there are imaging titles - or Clinical Imaging, An Illustrated Coplour Text is OK too.

    If you're not enev a med student yet, then make the most of the oportunity to find out more about medicine as a career pathwa. Speak to seniors about their route to their speciality. Talk to juniors about the realities of the current employment situation. Think of things from the patients POV which specialities have they been across on their "journey" (you can get that from the files you have access too). Anything that surprises you or interests you about how they were refered/diagnosed/etc?
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    (Original post by TommyWannabe)
    All the people who are saying 'you can learn nothing' are absolute morons. Anyone with Gray's Anatomy can start learning detailed radiographic anatomy. It's not hard.

    In terms of specific pathologies you could quite happily look up the common radiographic signs of each and try and identify them on radiographs. Once again, not hard.

    Edit: Also, no-one calls them CAT scans any more, just CT. The 'axial' is standard, and most CT scanners reconstruct in other planes as well.
    Reality check = this is hard enough to achieve as a medical student... Especially if you have lots of questions. If the OP really is work experience...
 
 
 
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