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    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    How do I get one?
    I don't really want anyone to know bout trying to get the diagnosis?
    I did a few online screenings which said I could have severe bi-polar and 1 orf two of my mates agreed.
    Previously I had deep depression (undiagnosed)
    And an undiagnosed eating disorde (wouldn't have been diagnosed because i was quite overweight when it started so basically fell to a normalish weight with health issues)

    What does diagnosis consist of
    Will I have to get counselling (I'm really scared of counsellors)
    Would I have to put it on my UCAS form and all those things that say do you have mental health problems-will that affect me badly.

    I'm so worried about the consequences but I want a straight answer/explanation.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    It's a start at least I din't want to go with no reason whatsoever.
    • #2
    #2

    i have loads of experience with this, if you're genuinely worried book an appointment with your gp, after having a thorough discussion about the changes in your mood and various other factors, you will be referred to the mental health services, depending on the urgency of your case, you could be waiting quite a long time.
    counsellors are full of crap and have no idea when it comes to mental health problems, initially you may be referred to a nurse, they ar also quite useless.

    as for UCAS, i wouldn't see an immediate need to put it on even if you did get this diagnosis.

    does this condition run in your family? it tends to be hereditry, so this would act as a big indicator as to whether you have it or not.
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    Also interested, I read that its hereditary, and a few people on my Dads side have it.
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Airel)
    Also interested, I read that its hereditary, and a few people on my Dads side have it.

    my great grandfather, my grandfather, dad, aunt and sisiter have bi-polar, it is quite prominant in my family. its a difficult condition to live with, and not really a diagnosis you should actively seek OP. there is a great deal of stigma attached to both this and schizophrenia, the general population are very ignorant regarding mental health issues.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Ok thanks for the help,
    I'm a female
    How do I get the GP appointment without them letting on to my family -tyhey'll not look to kindly if I have it (I think) ...I'm 17 btw
    My dad's had depression and was alcholic domestic abuser-tried overdose a few times and was on anti-depressants, sometimes seems bi-polarish

    Mum had depression and took anti-depressants

    My nan also ran away to spain for a while not sure if she was depressed
    So no one has it directly but dpression is common but there again my family has a very soap opera life.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    my great grandfather, my grandfather, dad, aunt and sisiter have bi-polar, it is quite prominant in my family. its a difficult condition to live with, and not really a diagnosis you should actively seek OP. there is a great deal of stigma attached to both this and schizophrenia, the general population are very ignorant regarding mental health issues.
    But isn't it better to know,rather than think I'm insane can't I keep the diagnosis private?
    • #2
    #2

    to be quite honest, at this point in life, it would be hard to hide various appointments that come mental health problems from your family. it sounds like you have a history of depression in your family; do you have phases of mania whereby you'll be absolutely high as a kite? as you haven't mentiooned phases of mania, i would assume taht like members of your fmaily you suffer from depression, in which case simply get an appointment with your gp (that no-one has to know about) discuss things and see what they say. you may just need some anti depressants to help you in life
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    • Thread Starter
    #1

    I had depression, I know I don't have that now because a lot of the time I sort of get happy or upset for no real reason and I just seem to either really annoyed and upset (to crying point) or really really happy. And sometimes i get this weird feeling with like both. I'll be like looking out the window on my way to college quite content and then I'll just switch to finding life really boring etc.

    I sounding quite mad aren't I.

    I heard anti-depressants make ppl under 18 suicidal or slelf harm- I don't want to feel that way again any more than I have to. How would I hide the pills etc. I wouldn't really know how to break it to my family that I'm still having problems when they're having them themselves... I can only really talk to my friends. My mum is in a passport moneygrabbing internet induced marriage which every1 is against inc me and secret from a lot of ppl so she has enough problems as well as her very ill dad etc.
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    Go to your GP.

    Nobody here is qualified to diagnose you, and self-diagnosis is pointless.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How do I get one?
    I don't really want anyone to know bout trying to get the diagnosis?
    Go to your GP, get a referal to the correct specialist.

    (Original post by Anonymous)

    And an undiagnosed eating disorde (wouldn't have been diagnosed because i was quite overweight when it started so basically fell to a normalish weight with health issues)
    And it just went away? If it did, you didn't have an eating disorder.
    If you self-recovered, well done, that's extremely difficult to do.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Would I have to put it on my UCAS form and all those things that say do you have mental health problems-will that affect me badly.
    Nope.
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    I feel like I've made this point 100 times on this forum, but please don't push yourself into a diagnosis.

    1) Having the label has negative consequences from others
    2) Having the label means you'll act to fulfill it
    3a) It could be that this phase will pass
    3b) It could be that these moods are a response to your life situation/circumstances, which aren't fixed
    4) Taking drugs has nasty withdrawal and side effects, and their effectiveness is seriously doubted anyway

    Saying all that, if you feel talking to someone about it could help, do so. People having been talking about their problems to solve them for eons, counselling is simply the modern, professional form of that practice.
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    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by AnonyMatt)
    And it just went away? If it did, you didn't have an eating disorder.
    If you self-recovered, well done, that's extremely difficult to do.
    .
    No it didn't just go away I still have a really bad body image and relapses but they are becoming less and less common.
    Also I eventually told my mum and she was very strict about it all so I can't really reuse my old tricks. Though sometimes when Im actuallyt not hungry I kinda get forced into food because my family don't believe me! I'm fine today though just ate minstrels lol.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    No it didn't just go away I still have a really bad body image and relapses but they are becoming less and less common.
    Also I eventually told my mum and she was very strict about it all so I can't really reuse my old tricks. Though sometimes when Im actuallyt not hungry I kinda get forced into food because my family don't believe me! I'm fine today though just ate minstrels lol.


    Go and see a specialist, and see if you can get on some meds (if that's what you want).
    To get medication though you may have to agree to a certain amount of therapy and/or counselling sessions.

    In fact, they may suggest only therapy.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    self-diagnosing using online 'screenings'....way to go brother.

    :rolleyes:
    Oh that's so bloody brave of you to go under anonymous, seriously get a grip you pig-headed nob
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Reflexive)
    Saying all that, if you feel talking to someone about it could help, do so. People having been talking about their problems to solve them for eons, counselling is simply the modern, professional form of that practice.
    Ok but at the same time wouldnt the counsellor push me into a diagnosis, I really don't know what to expect I'm afraid they'll be patronising and condesending.

    I was off school for a week due to meltdown in year 9 b/c my mum and grandad were wrongly arrested and my head of year tried to counsel on my return and it was a truly horrible experience I really didn't feel normal in the slightest and every1 I've ever known who has had counselling has reported similar things!

    Sorry I'm making this thread run on but this outletis really useful. When I tried to talk my college tutore about it affecting my GCSE grades just after I started she began quizzing me as if I were lying and said my grades were fine (though I was going to be applying red-brick) and that they wanted 'real' problems like a guy in my form whos grandad just died whoi he lived with and was very close to.

    To the above post how do I go about finding a specialist?

    I think Imay have just blown my cover lol forgot to tick anonymous box .
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    Go to your GP. :rolleyes:
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    Everybody has highs and lows, even depressive people.
    To be honest, unless your highs are causing serious issues in your life, such as gambling away your money, taking risks with your health or welfare, etc, it's probably just depression. Bipolar people are... It's hard to explain, but I've met quite a few in the course of my work and it's pretty terrible.
    Also, SSRIs, the type of ADs that are most known to cause suicide ideation in younger people are not generally prescribed as a first port of call for bipolar, as they make the mania worse
    Best wishes,
    Jess x
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    (Original post by rosielovesmitchell)
    Oh that's so bloody brave of you to go under anonymous, seriously get a grip you pig-headed nob
    lol

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Ok but at the same time wouldnt the counsellor push me into a diagnosis, I really don't know what to expect I'm afraid they'll be patronising and condesending.

    I was off school for a week due to meltdown in year 9 b/c my mum and grandad were wrongly arrested and my head of year tried to counsel on my return and it was a truly horrible experience I really didn't feel normal in the slightest and every1 I've ever known who has had counselling has reported similar things!

    Sorry I'm making this thread run on but this outletis really useful. When I tried to talk my college tutore about it affecting my GCSE grades just after I started she began quizzing me as if I were lying and said my grades were fine (though I was going to be applying red-brick) and that they wanted 'real' problems like a guy in my form whos grandad just died whoi he lived with and was very close to.

    To the above post how do I go about finding a specialist?

    I think Imay have just blown my cover lol forgot to tick anonymous box .
    I won't tell anyone who quoted me don't worry

    Some counsellors undoubtedly are patronising and useless. Some are good. There's massive variation in how they practice and how good they are.

    It's worrying hearing about your head. Sounds like she thought she'd give it a go when she doesn't really know what she's doing.

    The research seems to suggest that what makes counselling effective is a warm relationship between client/counsellor. So if you don't get on with them, or if someone at your school tries to counsel you and you don't feel comfortable, you don't have to go through with it.

    Some counsellors might push you into a diagnosis, but I think psychiatrists would be more inclined to do that because they probably need to before they give your drugs.

    The other thing is that even if a counsellor did give you a diagnosis, they probably wouldn't do so lightly, especially something like bi-polar, unlike you have seem to have done (self-diagnosis is generally a bad idea).
    • #2
    #2

    anti depressants can have bad effects on anyone despite age, i've been on prozac since i was 12 and its worked wonders
 
 
 
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