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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    anti depressants can have bad effects on anyone despite age, i've been on prozac since i was 12 and its worked wonders
    You were put on prozac when you were 12? Are you serious?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How do I get one?
    I don't really want anyone to know bout trying to get the diagnosis?
    I did a few online screenings which said I could have severe bi-polar and 1 orf two of my mates agreed.
    Previously I had deep depression (undiagnosed)
    And an undiagnosed eating disorde (wouldn't have been diagnosed because i was quite overweight when it started so basically fell to a normalish weight with health issues)

    What does diagnosis consist of
    Will I have to get counselling (I'm really scared of counsellors)
    Would I have to put it on my UCAS form and all those things that say do you have mental health problems-will that affect me badly.

    I'm so worried about the consequences but I want a straight answer/explanation.

    There isn't really a quick way to go about it per say. The only person who can diagnose you with bi-polar is a pychiatrist. And unless you're willing to go privae the only person who generally can refer you to see a psychiatrist is your GP. So your GP should be your first point of call.

    Primarily with bipolar, the treatment is mainly medication orientated as opposed to talking therapies, but thats not to say you wouldnt be offered that if you felt you needed it. Meds wise they tend to avoid anti-depressents and instead prefer mood stabilisers (or anti psychotics) though i do know people with bi-polar who are also taking anti depressents

    AS for UCAS you don't have to put it down but coming from someone who didn't declare her depression and suffered with it untreated for 3 years at uni, i think it might be betetr if you did. They can offer you more help that way.

    So yeah, try and see your GP asap, and in the meantime this site may offer some advice and info
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    You were put on prozac when you were 12? Are you serious?

    It can be prescribed to under 18's but its not common as Prozac isn't recommended for use on under 18's.

    Must have been severe, i've suffered with depression since i was 11 and it took till i was 18 for them to put me on meds (and prozac sends me manic :woo: )
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    OP, sorry to hear about your situation, but it sounds like you come from an unstable upbringing with your dad being an alchy and your mum being depressed and on meds, so my bet is that your mood swings and depression are rooted from that, so I'd advise seeing a counsellor if you can. They aren't patronising, quite the opposite, and if you see the RIGHT person then they can often help alot without you having to reach for the prescription.
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    :facepalm2:



    lol at the ignorance.
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    My friend went to her GP, who referred her to a counsellor: parental consent is not necessary.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How do I get one?
    It sounds like you're actively trying to seek a diagnosis for the sake of getting one, which is not healthy. If you feel you're not functioning properly and your mental state at the moment is impacting on your daily life then see a GP. As you're over 16 it'd all be confidential between you and the Dr.

    Were you actually diagnosed with an eating disorder? Because it sounds like you have self-diagnosed both an eating disorder and depression. It's slightly strange that you have decided to diagnose yourself with both of these problems. Is there a reason why you are looking to diagnose yourself with all these mental health issues?!

    It sounds that if you did have bipolar, it'd be a very mild case; people that have bipolar often swing between two extremes, and when they're manic they are often quite disinhibited, have pressure of speech, etc. It sounds like you are just experiencing the normal every day highs and lows that most normal people have.

    As for anti-depressants, the list of side-effects is endless and they react differently with everyone. And if it was felt that you had bipolar they might try and combine a low dose of anti-depressant with a mood stabiliser, so the risk of suicidal ideation may not be as high.
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    You were put on prozac when you were 12? Are you serious?
    I had a breakdown at 11 and was off school for a year (or maybe more) while I recovered, probably very rare, but mental health problems are very common in my family. so yes, prozac since I was 12
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    #1

    (Original post by smilee172)
    It sounds like you're actively trying to seek a diagnosis for the sake of getting one, which is not healthy. If you feel you're not functioning properly and your mental state at the moment is impacting on your daily life then see a GP. As you're over 16 it'd all be confidential between you and the Dr.

    Were you actually diagnosed with an eating disorder? Because it sounds like you have self-diagnosed both an eating disorder and depression. It's slightly strange that you have decided to diagnose yourself with both of these problems. Is there a reason why you are looking to diagnose yourself with all these mental health issues?!

    It sounds that if you did have bipolar, it'd be a very mild case; people that have bipolar often swing between two extremes, and when they're manic they are often quite disinhibited, have pressure of speech, etc. It sounds like you are just experiencing the normal every day highs and lows that most normal people have.

    As for anti-depressants, the list of side-effects is endless and they react differently with everyone. And if it was felt that you had bipolar they might try and combine a low dose of anti-depressant with a mood stabiliser, so the risk of suicidal ideation may not be as high.
    I think it's quite rude to say that i have some weird obsession with having mental health problems and trivialises any issues I have had it doesn't ntake a genius to work out that only drinking water and eating300 calories is wrong, that chewing food for the flavour and spitting it out is wrong that having you friend force feed is you isn't right.

    Or turning the lightds off shutting your bedroom door whilst crying sitting up till you have not more tears everynight and contemplating your suicide is normal.

    I can't believ how you've trivialised the fact that was able to identify my own problems.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I had a breakdown at 11 and was off school for a year (or maybe more) while I recovered, probably very rare, but mental health problems are very common in my family. so yes, prozac since I was 12
    A year I got 4 weeks!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think it's quite rude to say that i have some weird obsession with having mental health problems and trivialises any issues I have had it doesn't ntake a genius to work out that only drinking water and eating300 calories is wrong, that chewing food for the flavour and spitting it out is wrong that having you friend force feed is you isn't right.

    Or turning the lightds off shutting your bedroom door whilst crying sitting up till you have not more tears everynight and contemplating your suicide is normal.

    I can't believ how you've trivialised the fact that was able to identify my own problems.
    Well you didn't initially say that in your post. I am not trivialising your problems, I just feel that if they were bad enough to affect your life in such a way then why didn't you go to your GP for some help?
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    (Original post by Airel)
    Also interested, I read that its hereditary, and a few people on my Dads side have it.
    Only one theory. There's plenty of others.


    Also OP, you had 'deep depression' yet weren't diagnosed. In a few years time, you'll say you had 'deep bipolar'. Btw, 'deep' is the wrong word for it, lolol.


    The first part of becoming diagnosed is to go to your GP. They might then refer you to a psychiatrist.
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    (Original post by Antimatter)
    Everybody has highs and lows, even depressive people.
    To be honest, unless your highs are causing serious issues in your life, such as gambling away your money, taking risks with your health or welfare, etc, it's probably just depression. Bipolar people are... It's hard to explain, but I've met quite a few in the course of my work and it's pretty terrible.
    Also, SSRIs, the type of ADs that are most known to cause suicide ideation in younger people are not generally prescribed as a first port of call for bipolar, as they make the mania worse
    Best wishes,
    Jess x
    Tell me about it. I just went from 1k to £10 to my name. :dong:
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    (Original post by SuicideCommando)
    Tell me about it. I just went from 1k to £10 to my name. :dong:
    Really?
    **** me, PM me if you wanna chat :hugs:
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    Well you didn't initially say that in your post. I am not trivialising your problems, I just feel that if they were bad enough to affect your life in such a way then why didn't you go to your GP for some help?
    Going to a GP for help is hard, particularly for some disorders. I wouldn't tell a soul about my various ideas and compulsions. Talking about them like that... You'd realise how crazy you actually might be. No one really wants to be crazy, but at the same time if you feel you are crazy you want to know, that's why people tend to self-diagnose so much. The ease with which you can self-diagnose these days obviously makes that more common, and probably makes actual diagnoses more common as well (because people who wouldn't otherwise realise/think there was something clinically wrong with them or someone they know are influenced into obtaining that help).
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    (Original post by littleshambles)
    Going to a GP for help is hard, particularly for some disorders. I wouldn't tell a soul about my various ideas and compulsions. Talking about them like that... You'd realise how crazy you actually might be. No one really wants to be crazy, but at the same time if you feel you are crazy you want to know, that's why people tend to self-diagnose so much. The ease with which you can self-diagnose these days obviously makes that more common, and probably makes actual diagnoses more common as well (because people who wouldn't otherwise realise/think there was something clinically wrong with them or someone they know are influenced into obtaining that help).
    I understand it;s difficult, I;ve been there myself. But if I was ready to talk to strangers on the internet about my disorders/ideas/problems, I'd be ready to talk to a GP. Although I suppose it could be easier to talk to strangers behind a computer screen than a GP. My point in this though is that the OP ideally needs to speak to her GP to get some help.
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    (Original post by Reflexive)
    I feel like I've made this point 100 times on this forum, but please don't push yourself into a diagnosis.

    1) Having the label has negative consequences from others
    2) Having the label means you'll act to fulfill it
    3a) It could be that this phase will pass
    3b) It could be that these moods are a response to your life situation/circumstances, which aren't fixed
    4) Taking drugs has nasty withdrawal and side effects, and their effectiveness is seriously doubted anyway

    Saying all that, if you feel talking to someone about it could help, do so. People having been talking about their problems to solve them for eons, counselling is simply the modern, professional form of that practice.
    I love you. You just articulated pretty much everything I think about this whole self-diagnosis of bipolarity.

    OP, we understand you have a family history of it, but you can avoid labelling yourself with it until you're certain.

    GO TO YOUR GP.


    (EDIT: I actually went to my GP about something else but broke down in the office and was referred to psychiatry immediately).
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    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    I love you. You just articulated pretty much everything I think about this whole self-diagnosis of bipolarity.
    Ooh thanks, you too
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I think I have over 9000 mental health disorders.
    That's all I saw. Go to your GP if you're concerned.
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    #1

    Thats the point i am now ready to go to my GP thats why i posted on here i just wasn't sure if they werew the right person to talk to ...maybe my school counsellor would be a better idea thats all i came on to find out.

    btw i didn't knoiw i said 'deep' lol.
 
 
 
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