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    (Original post by necessarily benevolent)
    How about a Gobineau/Rushton-esque view that the poverty and failing standards are the consequences of ethnicity? :o:
    If you look at ethnicities that offset their relative poverty with disproportionate investment in education - I'm thinking particularly of Chinese and Indians - then these groups seems to contribute to rising standards in education. It is their attitude to education (and the financial resources available to them to pursue the attitude) that matters, not their ethnicity.
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    (Original post by Ribbits)
    I am honestly confused. Has no one on TSR experienced the benefits of multiculturalism? Even the Londoners here seem against it!
    I'm a Londoner but have noticed some drawbacks of the current state of race in London. There's quite a bit of informal self-segregation with select boroughs containing a disproportionate amount of minority ethnic groups. It would help if they themselves mixed in properly. Half of all black people in Britain live in London. You won't see black people in provincial cities like Durham - more chance of seeing a ghost. Ask them why. It's their responsibility to assimilate into society just as much as we should cater for them.
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    I'm a Londoner but have noticed some drawbacks of the current state of race in London. There's quite a bit of informal self-segregation with select boroughs containing a disproportionate amount of minority ethnic groups. It would help if they themselves mixed in properly. Half of all black people in Britain live in London. You won't see black people in provincial cities like Durham - more chance of seeing a ghost. Ask them why. It's their responsibility to assimilate into society just as much as we should cater for them.
    Hm, I see. But I think often the problem is exaggerated on TSR. Even though there are many people who do live in areas that are self-segregated, most of the younger generations do assimilate into British society completely (in my experience) - even if they continue living in the segregated areas that is only part of their home life rather than their wider social life. I was asking my friends about this the other day, one point often brought up on TSR is language barriers but I personally haven't really come across it as a problem. Adults who move here often only pick up enough English to get by, but their children or anyone who comes here quite young pick it up much faster and become fluent because not speaking English is a major disadvantage. Schools full of minorities may have few native English, but the minorities themselves are diverse and wide-ranging with many different languages, so it is easiest to communicate in English. I've never come across a young person (under 30 say) who did not speak at least half-decent English, if not completely fluent - either learning at Primary school or quite fast during High school if they arrived later.

    This is all just based on my own experiences, which are not representative of the whole of London obviously. But from where I am standing, the youth are well integrated and there is very little racism - certainly no racism against white people.

    There are several small friendship groups of Asians/blacks in schools, but there are also small friendship groups of whites and popular kids that I would find it equally difficult to get into. You just socialise and mix in the same way you would at any other school, finding people who you fit in with irrelative of race or culture… and avoid ‘ganstas’.
 
 
 
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