Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    What made YOU want to study law at university. It's a big quesion for at interviews, so i was just wondering WHY it is that so many of us are considering a legal career...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by irish_4_life)
    What made YOU want to study law at university. It's a big quesion for at interviews, so i was just wondering WHY it is that so many of us are considering a legal career...
    Well, for me, it's because I relish the intellectual challenge that law will bring. Cannot say for sure that I'll definitely enjoy all the modules, but sufficient enough for me to set my mind to pursue law in the university.

    Does that help?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    ..........because i want to burn in hell!!! MUAHAHAHAH!!!!!!!






    Seriously..joke...no dis-respect for lawyers...impulse post :P
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    For the lulz.



    I just made up some crap and generic reason as to why I wanted to study it in my PS, because I know my real reason would not be suitable.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Because I think I'd be good at it, I liked the A level, and I've had friends who have studied it who helped me realise it's what I want to do.

    That, and I don't think I know what else I'd do :p:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by irish_4_life)
    What made YOU want to study law at university. It's a big quesion for at interviews, so i was just wondering WHY it is that so many of us are considering a legal career...
    Personally, I applied because I find it fascinating, complex, and interesting.

    However, remember that you are applying to read law; you are not applying for a legal career. Seperate the two.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because I want to become a lawyer...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by blinkbelle)
    Because I want to become a lawyer...
    Same here. "Why do you want to be a lawyer" is a much better question, but sadly the university admissions committees haven't worked that out.

    This reminds me of a conversation I had with the chair of a pupillage committee. One of the questions that appears on the application is "why do you want a pupillage?" She said it's one of the most useless questions, and that they as a chambers have agreed to essentially ignore it. The problem is this:

    If you answer the question and don't talk about tenancy and being a qualified barrister, it sounds naive and disingenuous. If you do talk about tenancy, it sounds presumptuous.

    In her words: "We know why you want a pupillage. You know why you want a pupillage. It's the same reason that everyone else wants a pupillage. You want to be a barrister. Do we really need a 250-word waffle on the subject?"
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    you can only do well in law if you get AAA, otherwise there is no point doing it, the competition is too fierce.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gr8)
    you can only do well in law if you get AAA, otherwise there is no point doing it, the competition is too fierce.
    Wrong, wrong, wrong. Also, off topic.

    But, to feed the troll:
    I know many students who have received training contracts at firms that anyone would consider "top" without AAA: one had ABB, one had BBB. Both had excelled at university, and demonstrated their capacity for growth and that they were highly capable and prepared for the practice of law.

    Also, you've made a fundamental mistake. Your A-level grades, to the extent that they are relevant at all, are only relevant to whether or not you secure that first rung on the ladder, be it TC or pupillage. No tenancy committee is going to reject you on the grounds of your A-levels, and no firm is going to make a qualification decision based on your A-levels either. So they don't determine whether you "do well" in law, they merely have an influence on where you secure your training.

    In any event, if you work hard at university, participate in serious extracurriculars like mooting or pro bono work, nobody is going to get too worked up about your A-level grades.

    Firms care about whether you'll fit their vision for the future of the firm, and whether you'll be a profitable member of the team. Chambers care about your potential as an advocate and your ability to survive at the bar. Neither has much to do with how well you satisfied the national curriculum criteria on an exam you took when you were 17.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MelesMeles)
    Wrong, wrong, wrong. Also, off topic.

    But, to feed the troll:
    I know many students who have received training contracts at firms that anyone would consider "top" without AAA: one had ABB, one had BBB. Both had excelled at university, and demonstrated their capacity for growth and that they were highly capable and prepared for the practice of law.

    Also, you've made a fundamental mistake. Your A-level grades, to the extent that they are relevant at all, are only relevant to whether or not you secure that first rung on the ladder, be it TC or pupillage. No tenancy committee is going to reject you on the grounds of your A-levels, and no firm is going to make a qualification decision based on your A-levels either. So they don't determine whether you "do well" in law, they merely have an influence on where you secure your training.

    In any event, if you work hard at university, participate in serious extracurriculars like mooting or pro bono work, nobody is going to get too worked up about your A-level grades.

    Firms care about whether you'll fit their vision for the future of the firm, and whether you'll be a profitable member of the team. Chambers care about your potential as an advocate and your ability to survive at the bar. Neither has much to do with how well you satisfied the national curriculum criteria on an exam you took when you were 17.
    You would not get into the Chambers with lower A-levels, it is still competitive. Also I've heard magic circle firms take all their pick from oxbridge students, some oxbridge students won't even make it.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gr8)
    You would not get into the Chambers with lower A-levels, it is still competitive. Also I've heard magic circle firms take all their pick from oxbridge students, some oxbridge students won't even make it.
    Nice of you to post some of your hearsay, but it still doesn't mean you can't do well in law without As at A-level.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gr8)
    You would not get into the Chambers with lower A-levels, it is still competitive. Also I've heard magic circle firms take all their pick from oxbridge students, some oxbridge students won't even make it.
    You know the Magic Cricle are a group of solicitors firms? Good, just checking...anbd the MC firms will hire any applicantt hat is good enough, not just oxbridgers.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gr8)
    You would not get into the Chambers with lower A-levels, it is still competitive. Also I've heard magic circle firms take all their pick from oxbridge students, some oxbridge students won't even make it.
    Grades alone are insufficient to warrant an offer of a Training Contract. They will be interested in personal (hard and soft) skills, work experience (legal and commercial), interesting and worthwhile extra-curriculars, communication ability and confidence.

    You'd be surprised how many people with good A Levels and degrees won't get a training contract, because they are too academic and have not developed any kind of social skills. I've met several people like that. I also know of a few from lower universities (ex-polys), with decent A Levels and degrees who are now with Magic Circle firms. I'm also sure there are more out there.

    Oxbridge is not supreme, everyone is weighed on individual merit. Really. Firms are not going to deprive themselves of quality candidates because they did not attend Oxbridge. It is just a cliche that a lot of people use nowadays to justify the reasons why they are being turned down for training contracts. It takes time, it takes effort, and it takes talent and ability; and I don't mean solely in the examination room.

    It is more competetive for barristers, and we generally see the majority coming from Oxbridge because broadly speaking, a lot of the best candidates overall attend these institutions. It isn't just because they went to Oxbridge, however. There are a spectrum of reasons.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I broadly agree with all the above.

    Oxbridge is a definite advantage, but you need to tick more boxes than just the academic one to get a TC with a MC firm. You need to demonstrate that you have a decent client manner on paper and in person, and need to demonstrate that you are committed. If you don't tick all of those three boxes, you won't get very far.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    why not?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rosyred809)
    why not?
    They are the basic requirements to be a lawyer. If we take the example of a job in a firm of solicitors, you need to have academic achievement to be able to understand the law and advise clients properly. However, if you lack business skills or come across as unprofessional then the firm isn't going to want you to put you in front of a client how well you understand the law. Even if you have the achievement and the professionalism, training a young lawyer is very expensive, and a big waste of money if the firm thinks you are going to disappear as soon as you are done training.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jingers)
    For the lulz.



    I just made up some crap and generic reason as to why I wanted to study it in my PS, because I know my real reason would not be suitable.
    What was the real reason??
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.