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Getting into boxing: appropriate excercise watch

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    So, I'm interested in starting boxing, it's really one of the only sports that appeals to me, but right now I'm in no shape whatsoever to start... before I actually start, I'd like to be in better physical shape. I've done some research about training for boxing n stuff, but unfortunately, I know ****-all about excercise or fitness whatsoever so I don't know how I'd go about getting in some sort of shape to START doing that. Any help is appreciated. Apology in advance for my total ignorance.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    So, I'm interested in starting boxing, it's really one of the only sports that appeals to me, but right now I'm in no shape whatsoever to start... before I actually start, I'd like to be in better physical shape. I've done some research about training for boxing n stuff, but unfortunately, I know ****-all about excercise or fitness whatsoever so I don't know how I'd go about getting in some sort of shape to START doing that. Any help is appreciated. Apology in advance for my total ignorance.
    Join a boxing gym and they will kick your ass into shape or out the door.
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    Well yeah but I'd like to be a bit prepared before that
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    Skipping.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    Skipping.
    Yea, that's one I read actually.
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    HIIT or Tabata, try to keep the intervals to match the rounds in boxing. I think one round is three minutes so a break every three minutes. But only if you feel you can hack it.
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    Well yeah but I'd like to be a bit prepared before that
    What's your height and weight?

    Have you ever done any other training for anything?

    Do you currently lift weights? What are your lifts like at the moment? (don't say curls)

    How long have you got until you sign up?
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    (Original post by SMed)
    What's your height and weight?

    Have you ever done any other training for anything?

    Do you currently lift weights? What are your lifts like at the moment? (don't say curls)

    How long have you got until you sign up?
    6' 66kg

    nope

    nope

    months



    which is why I don't want to walk straight in there with no preparation at all. sounds like a recipe for disaster to me.
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    You need stamina, when my ex and his mate did boxing it seemed they did more fitness and cardio than actual boxing. It sounded pretty exhausting.
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    It's easy. Just do this:

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    On a serious note, skipping is a good place to start. It gets your legs in the right shape for boxing, improves fitness and co-ordination and, if you do 3 minutes and 1 minute break, gets you used to rounds.

    Generally, old school training is the best. This guide is very good: http://www.eastsideboxing.com/forum/showthread.php?t=60
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    (Original post by Bagration)
    6' 66kg

    nope

    nope

    months



    which is why I don't want to walk straight in there with no preparation at all. sounds like a recipe for disaster to me.
    Get bigger. Get stronger. Eat more. You are VERY underweight. If you were to fight a trained boxer at your weight, they will likely be much shorter and stronger and will knock you into the middle of next week.

    You can get stronger AND fitter doing strength training, but you can't get stronger doing cardio.

    Do something like Starting Strength Or WS4SB may be slightly better for athletes; but it's harder and more complicated.

    The boxing gym won't let you start sparring straight away anyway. They'll make sure you get fit first. Doing some serious strength training will prepare you physically and mentally for the havoc they're going to wreak on you.
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    Hey, I did boxing for a year - i went cold turkey and its shocking how fast your ass is kicked! Like somebody pointed out before you should work on stamina. The first things they will do with you is workout anyway. They will teach you correct stance and footwork.

    You will have to work on your speed at whatever you do. I would reccomend, skipping, cardio and weights.
    For instance you should work out every second day, if you are not skinny or a healthy bmi for your height i highly reccomend loosihng a bit of weight. To loose weight healthily do cardio for 20-30 mins a day and then something to make you sweat for a further 30 mins. I jogged every dayand did weights and crunches plus slkipping. you really need to skip well, its sooo benificial to your footwork, you need to be very light on your feet and fast. if you have any questions about what you might expect to do at boxing send me a message.
    good luck x
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    (Original post by SMed)
    Get bigger. Get stronger. Eat more. You are VERY underweight. If you were to fight a trained boxer at your weight, they will likely be much shorter and stronger and will knock you into the middle of next week.
    That's not necessarily true at all. Tommy Hearns was 6'1 and weighed 147 lbs for a large part of his career, and he could knock people silly with his right hand. Having a lanky frame isn't necessarily a disadvantage, as long as you have a decent back and good body movement to get the necessary weight transfer for punching power. Synthetic muscle doesn't do well in boxing.

    EDIT: Indeed, Hearns is ranked 17th on Ring Magazine's list of 100 deadliest punchers of all time.
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    (Original post by shamrock92)
    That's not necessarily true at all. Tommy Hearns was 6'1 and weighed 147 lbs for a large part of his career, and he could knock people silly with his right hand. Having a lanky frame isn't necessarily a disadvantage, as long as you have a decent back and good body movement to get the necessary weight transfer for punching power. Synthetic muscle doesn't do well in boxing.

    EDIT: Indeed, Hearns is ranked 17th on Ring Magazine's list of 100 deadliest punchers of all time.
    There are always exceptions. But Hearns was trained at least. OP is COMPLETELY untrained and probably relatively weak.

    I'm just saying that some strength training will be beneficial. He doesn't necessarily need to bulk up to 100kg but like-for-like, strength will always be better.

    Stamina and fitness will be crucial in fighting. But they will work on that once you start training, as well as technique. You won't be able to gain a decent amount of strength and mass once you start training seriously, recovery will be a limiting factor. You can do it, but it won't be ideal.

    I would get some strength training done first. Get some nice gains. Maybe do a few conditioning sessions here and there. Then switch to proper full-on boxing training with a few strength training sessions to maintain the size and strength from before.

    But that's just my opinion and I'm not a boxing expert. It just sounds like a good idea.
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    (Original post by SMed)
    There are always exceptions. But Hearns was trained at least. OP is COMPLETELY untrained and probably relatively weak.

    I'm just saying that some strength training will be beneficial. He doesn't necessarily need to bulk up to 100kg but like-for-like, strength will always be better.

    Stamina and fitness will be crucial in fighting. But they will work on that once you start training, as well as technique. You won't be able to gain a decent amount of strength and mass once you start training seriously, recovery will be a limiting factor. You can do it, but it won't be ideal.

    I would get some strength training done first. Get some nice gains. Maybe do a few conditioning sessions here and there. Then switch to proper full-on boxing training with a few strength training sessions to maintain the size and strength from before.

    But that's just my opinion and I'm not a boxing expert. It just sounds like a good idea.
    I'd agree, but encouraging him to go lift weights isn't a great idea. You have to be strong relative to your weight; old-school training like press-ups, circuits, chopping down trees etc. will give you the right strength. It'll also come as you begin to train more. Again, my point is that you don't have to be bulky to be strong - Hearns isn't the only example: Robinson, Duran, Arguello and Dempsey are all examples of top punchers who didn't have big muscles but were tremendously powerful guys.
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    Again, summarily, this link is magic.
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    i think op should stick to weights. and running. and get a punching bag. when i did boxing my ccoach had me doing weights every session. and bench presses. and jogging on the spot on a big cushy mat. you should do unconventional weight training though.

    Get a circular weight and tie a belt through the hole, tie the other end on to something like a stick (a stong one mind you) and you turn the stick around (like rolling a rolling pin) and around in both hands which are on either side of it until the weight is pulled up by the stick. i cant remember exactly what it does but my coach was daft on it.
    you should also take two weights in either hand and systematically hold them out in front of you with outstretched arms, hold for a minute, hold them directly above your head with outstretched arms for a minute , and hold them outstretched at your sides for a minute. repeat.
    im trying to rememeber what else we did but the running, skipping and weights were frequent. I wouldnt worry about different types of exercise and stamina building the fact is its quite repetitive, but the main thing is doing it for extended periods of time and at continually increasing speeds.
    x
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    (Original post by shamrock92)
    I'd agree, but encouraging him to go lift weights isn't a great idea. You have to be strong relative to your weight; old-school training like press-ups, circuits, chopping down trees etc. will give you the right strength. It'll also come as you begin to train more. Again, my point is that you don't have to be bulky to be strong - Hearns isn't the only example: Robinson, Duran, Arguello and Dempsey are all examples of top punchers who didn't have big muscles but were tremendously powerful guys.
    I know you don't need to do weights to be successful at boxing. But I still think he will be in a better place training wise if he was stronger; not necessarily bigger, though some weight gain will be inevitable and beneficial. Plus, the OP is 66kg at walking-around weight, not weigh-in weight.

    As I said, doing something as physically and mentally challenging as a good heavy compound weightlifting routine will make him better prepared.

    Cardio of course will be beneficial but this will be addressed once in the boxing gym. Strength training will probably not, maybe though.

    I know one doesn't have to weigh a lot to have a solid punch, but strength is important. Those fighters, I'm sure, have lifted some heavy-ass weights at some point in their lives.

    I'm just talking about building a little foundation before specialising.
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    Just join a boxing gym, they will prepare you properly. My gym has two hour sessions, and for at least the first hour its mostly cardio and stuff, then for the second half you learn to box.
 
 
 
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