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    I have just finished doin AS's in English Lit, Classics, Law and Dance. I took classics and eng lit because they're respected subjects by unis, however im regrettin this decision because if i'd chosen easier subjects (im aware dance and law aren't difficult) i could of gotten higher grades and even if i'd gotten AAA in those i'd have a better chance of gettin into a better uni, rather than having ABB/AAB in my chosen subjects , is this true?
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    What do you want to do at university?
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    Yes, this is true ... which is why a lot of the advice on TSR is absolute TURD.
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    (Original post by JayAyy)
    What do you want to do at university?
    Law
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    I hate it when people think no A is the end of the world.
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    Feeling same here but I think by not doing "hard" subjects you're not challenging yourself and aiming high. I felt it this way when I got a grade lower than what I expected. But instead of seeing this as a barrier for my success, I view this as a challenge to improve my understanding and learning.
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    (Original post by ANAH)
    I hate it when people think no A is the end of the world.
    I don't, just means i can't get into the uni's i want to go to
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    Obviously you took said subjects at AS because you enjoy them? There's no point in doing A-Levels you're not going to enjoy just because they're more "respected" at universities. I don't think so anyway
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    I don't think that's exactly true.
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    Fact is, don't a lot of uni's blacklist law at A-level anyway and so wouldn;t have helped you in the slightest.

    Also what makes you think that you won't get aaaa?
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    (Original post by SirMasterKey)
    Fact is, don't a lot of uni's blacklist law at A-level anyway and so wouldn;t have helped you in the slightest.

    Also what makes you think that you won't get aaaa?
    yeah i no law was one of my 'soft' options but it's not blacklisted by any of the uni's i plan to apply to . I messed up my english lit exam badly and didnt really take dance that seriously because i knew i was dropping it at A2.
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    (Original post by SirMasterKey)
    Fact is, don't a lot of uni's blacklist law at A-level anyway and so wouldn;t have helped you in the slightest.

    Also what makes you think that you won't get aaaa?
    No, this is a common misconception. It doesn't advantage an application, but neither does it disadvantage one. I personally of the opinion that it's advantageous as it can help you decide whether or not law is actually for you, and loads of current degree students have told my law teacher that taking law beforehand has helped them loads with their degree.
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    (Original post by hendy16)
    Law
    I think you just need to have a strong application if you believe that the subjects you have choosen have hindered your application.

    Gain work experience, read around the subject and keep up to date with recent cases would strengthen your application significantly.
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    (Original post by SirMasterKey)
    Fact is, don't a lot of uni's blacklist law at A-level anyway and so wouldn;t have helped you in the slightest.
    D'you fancy getting your facts right before commenting?
    Its neither an advantange, nor disadvantage. Do the subjects that interest you, if it means you'll do better in them.
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    To all of the law students in this thread saying Law A Level is okay...

    The fact of the matter is, top universities will judge an applicant with;

    Maths - A
    English Lit - A
    History - A
    French - A

    exactly equally to someone with

    Maths - A
    English Lit - A
    History - A
    French - A
    Law - A

    Yes, the law didn't disadvantage the application, but it wasn't exactly useful for the student to spend a large amount of time studying for instead of focussing on their other subjects.

    Unless of course you took Law A Level for the purpose of determining whether or not you actually enjoy being taught law - but from what people tell me, most law applicants settle on applying for Law long before they start A Levels (as a competitive subject, universities expect applicants to be "passionate" about the subject).
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    Even if you DON'T get all As you still have chance to improve next year. I got a B in my AS English language (210 exactly!) and I'm pretty sure I've managed to go up a whole grade this year through hard work and 1 resit. Even though those subjects might be 'harder' you're helping yourself out a lot. I can imagine law is quite essay-based, right? So English lit will definitely help you! In reality there aren't really 'easy' subjects. They all require effort.
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    (Original post by Xerophelistica)
    To all of the law students in this thread saying Law A Level is okay...

    The fact of the matter is, top universities will judge an applicant with;

    Maths - A
    English Lit - A
    History - A
    French - A

    exactly equally to someone with

    Maths - A
    English Lit - A
    History - A
    French - A
    Law - A

    Yes, the law didn't disadvantage the application, but it wasn't exactly useful for the student to spend a large amount of time studying for instead of focussing on their other subjects.

    Unless of course you took Law A Level for the purpose of determining whether or not you actually enjoy being taught law - but from what people tell me, most law applicants settle on applying for Law long before they start A Levels (as a competitive subject, universities expect applicants to be "passionate" about the subject).
    Your example is completely redundant. We’re talking about three A levels here, not five ... five A levels over four will generally not advantage an application much anyway, regardless of subject combination. The amount of people who do a Law degree and then decide that they don't like it, having never studied Law before, is very high. English Literature, Classics and Law are perfectly fine as A levels which can get you into any top university. There's no point in doing those four supposedly 'hard' subjects if you want to go to an AAA university, but can only get Bs, since universities make offers on grades, not subjects. It's better to do three subjects which you are good at, enjoy and are able to get the best possible grades in (i.e. AAA for the top universities) ... as this thread proves. Plus, A level Law isn't exactly an 'easy' choice anyway; pretty much everyone in my Law class says it's their hardest A level.
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    (Original post by simon12345)
    Your example is completely redundant. We’re talking about three A levels here, not five ... five A levels over four will generally not advantage an application much anyway, regardless of subject combination.
    Actually, I didn't say anything about them being full A Levels. I thought it was assumed that they were AS Level grades, seeing as those are the grades you usually apply with (discounting deferred entry).

    (Original post by simon12345)
    The amount of people who do a Law degree and then decide that they don't like it, having never studied Law before, is very high. English Literature, Classics and Law are perfectly fine as A levels which can get you into any top university. There's no point in doing those four supposedly 'hard' subjects if you want to go to an AAA university, but can only get Bs, since universities make offers on grades, not subjects. It's better to do three subjects which you are good at, enjoy and are able to get the best possible grades in (i.e. AAA for the top universities) ... as this thread proves. Plus, A level Law isn't exactly an 'easy' choice anyway; pretty much everyone in my Law class says it's their hardest A level.
    For many top universities, the condition of getting AAA is that at least 2 of these be in supposedly "hard" subjects, and for a good shot at getting a place all 3 should really be "hard" subjects. I'm not defending this practice of cherry-picking subjects at all, I'm simply trying to tell applicants the way things are, however unfair/stupid they might be.

    Source: http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604
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    (Original post by Xerophelistica)
    For many top universities, the condition of getting AAA is that at least 2 of these be in supposedly "hard" subjects, and for a good shot at getting a place all 3 should really be "hard" subjects. I'm not defending this practice of cherry-picking subjects at all, I'm simply trying to tell applicants the way things are, however unfair/stupid they might be.

    Source: http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604
    You do realise that's one college in one university, don't you? They are not the voice of every single university in the country. Plus, an applicant with AAA in Classics, English Literature and Law will have a chance of getting accepted, whereas an applicant with AAB in Classics, English Literature and History will not. This is the point I'm making. My friend got pooled by Trinity for Law; with English Literature & Language, Law and Business Studies at A2, and was then accepted into Sidney Sussex. Plenty of people in my Law class having been given offers at top universities for Law with suppodedly 'soft' A levels. Yes it's better to do the best possible subject recommendations for entry to Law if you can get AAA, but only if you can get AAA. Universities don't care about you subject combination as much as you may think.
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    (Original post by hendy16)
    I don't, just means i can't get into the uni's i want to go to
    Call them up and ask if they would consider your application. Then write an amazing personal statement and win them over with your charm, determination and potential.
 
 
 
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