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    (Original post by seagulled)
    Hi guys. Only just started my TSA practice, but I literally cannot get the answer to Number 18 on the Specimen Paper... i'm so confused!

    'The island Republic of Outlandia has three banks; Barkers, Floyds and national. During a particular day Barkers customers have written cheques worth three millions Lire to Floyds customers and cheques worth four million Lira to National Customers. Floyds customers have written chequres worth four million lire to barkers customers and cheques worth five million Lire to National customers. National customers have written cheques worth three million Lira to Barkers customers and cheques worth two million Lire to Floyds customers.

    The Banks could settle all the debts to each other that arise because of tehse cheques by:

    A) Floyds Bank paying one million Lira to Barkers Bank and Barkers Bank paying one million Lira to national bank

    B) Floyds bank paying three million Lira to National Bank
    c) Floyds Bank paying four million Lira to National Bank
    D) Barkers Bank paying one million Lira to National Bank
    E) Barkers Bank paying four million Lira to National Bank

    Any explanation would be fantastic.
    Barkers: -3 -4 +4 +3 = 0
    Floyds: +3 -4 -5 +2 = -4

    Here's already the answer. Floyd has to pay 4 million Lira and Barkers none.
    --> C

    (to finish it: National: +4 +5 -3 -2 = +4)
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    Hi

    I didn't get this one either but here it is explained:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...postcount=2502

    I found it to be easiest to draw a triangle with a bank at each corner. Then you use arrows with the numbers signifying the debt. So you will have three sides of the triangle with these numbers over them. You can then subtract the two numbers on one of the sides from each other giving you the overall debt between two banks. So if I owed you 5 and you owe me two then I would just give you 3. When you have done this you will see that Floyds still owes 3 to N and 1 to B. B in turn owes said 1 to N. So overall F can just give N 4 and that'll settle all debts.
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    (Original post by seagulled)
    Hi guys. Only just started my TSA practice, but I literally cannot get the answer to Number 18 on the Specimen Paper... i'm so confused!

    'The island Republic of Outlandia has three banks; Barkers, Floyds and national. During a particular day Barkers customers have written cheques worth three millions Lire to Floyds customers and cheques worth four million Lira to National Customers. Floyds customers have written chequres worth four million lire to barkers customers and cheques worth five million Lire to National customers. National customers have written cheques worth three million Lira to Barkers customers and cheques worth two million Lire to Floyds customers.

    The Banks could settle all the debts to each other that arise because of tehse cheques by:

    A) Floyds Bank paying one million Lira to Barkers Bank and Barkers Bank paying one million Lira to national bank

    B) Floyds bank paying three million Lira to National Bank
    c) Floyds Bank paying four million Lira to National Bank
    D) Barkers Bank paying one million Lira to National Bank
    E) Barkers Bank paying four million Lira to National Bank

    Any explanation would be fantastic.

    (key: Barkers owes floyds 3m = B F 3)

    B F 3
    B N 4
    F B 4
    F N 5
    N B 3
    N F 2

    B F 3 and F B 4 cancel to F B 1
    B N 4 and N B 3 cancel to B N 1
    F N 5 and N F 2 cancel to F N 3

    so its now:
    F B 1
    B N 1
    F N 3

    F B 1 and B N 1 cancel to F N 1

    F N 1 and F N 3 combine to make F N 4

    so the answer is C
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    (Original post by 09911041)
    Barkers: -3 -4 +4 +3 = 0
    Floyds: +3 -4 -5 +2 = -4

    Here's already the answer. Floyd has to pay 4 million Lira and Barkers none.
    --> C

    (to finish it: National: +4 +5 -3 -2 = +4)
    that makes more sense than mine
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    Hi! I am an international applicant and have never written an essay like this, so if anyone could give me an essay of one of the questions given in he specimen test papers(e.g. the forgiveness one), I would be really happy. I just wrote a few essays but I´ve no possibility to compare... I don´t know whether I shoud state my opinion in my introduction or just in my conclusion and how many arguments to include etc...If I could have a look at one that would be really nice!

    Thanks
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    (Original post by berlinPPE)
    Hi! I am an international applicant and have never written an essay like this, so if anyone could give me an essay of one of the questions given in he specimen test papers(e.g. the forgiveness one), I would be really happy. I just wrote a few essays but I´ve no possibility to compare... I don´t know whether I shoud state my opinion in my introduction or just in my conclusion and how many arguments to include etc...If I could have a look at one that would be really nice!

    Thanks
    Yep, same applies to me. I wouldn't mind having that too
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    (Original post by Merk that Sike of a Mike)
    Still don't get these two questions:
    1)On the M53 is a sign 'Warrington 20'. Just over half a mile further on is another sign
    'Warrington 19'. This is not really surprising, since the distances are rounded to the
    nearest whole number of miles e.g. numbers of 4.5 and over but less than 5 become 5,
    numbers of 4 and over but less than 4.5 become 4. Half a mile futher along the road is a
    sign showing 'Warrington 18'.
    The distance to Warrington must now be between
    A 17.5 miles and 17.6 miles
    B 17.6 miles and 18.0 miles
    C 18.0 miles and 18.2 miles
    D 18.2 miles and 18.4 miles
    E 18.4 miles and 18.5 miles
    Kneechuch has explained again but in case you still don't get it...

    At the Warrington 20 sign, you must be between 19.5 and 20.5 miles from Warringotn.

    To get to the Warrington 18 sign from the Warrington 20 sign, you have moved "just over half a mile" and then "half a mile further". This is equal to "just over 1 mile", right?

    So, if you're 19.5-20.5 miles from Warrington and you go "just over 1 mile" to Warrington, you are now "just under 18.5-just under 19.5 miles" from Warrington, right? Important you get this point.. re read it. So at the Warington 18 sign, you are both
    - "just under 18.5-just under 19.5 miles" from Warrington, and
    - 17.5-18.5 miles from Warrington (obviously, right?)

    Therefore you must be between "just under 18.5 miles" and 18.5 miles from Warrington. The only answer that fits is E.

    Sorry for long winded explanation.
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    (Original post by Kneechuh)
    It's C, right? It's the same as the lighthouse problem that was posted earlier. LCM of 18, 48 and 90 is 720. 720 / 48 = 15?
    I get how it's C
    Spoiler:
    Show

    -90 only goes into numbers ending in 0 like 90, 180, 270, 360, etc
    -the only numbers 48 goes into which also end in 0 are multiples of 240 like 240, 480, 720, etc.

    The first number 90 goes into from above is 720

    And then you do 720 divide by 18 to check 18 goes into which it does

    48 into 720 goes 15 so its 15

    But my method is so slow. Is there a faster way of working out the LCM of 18, 48 and 90 to get 720? The only way I can think is multplying 18 x 48 x 90 :o:
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    (Original post by PGtips92)
    I get how it's C
    Spoiler:
    Show

    -90 only goes into numbers ending in 0 like 90, 180, 270, 360, etc
    -the only numbers 48 goes into which also end in 0 are multiples of 240 like 240, 480, 720, etc.

    The first number 90 goes into from above is 720

    And then you do 720 divide by 18 to check 18 goes into which it does

    48 into 720 goes 15 so its 15

    But my method is so slow. Is there a faster way of working out the LCM of 18, 48 and 90 to get 720? The only way I can think is multplying 18 x 48 x 90 :o:
    Here's a good page

    Scroll to the: 'Finding HCF & LCM with prime factorisations' bit
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    (Original post by Kneechuh)
    Here's a good page

    Scroll to the: 'Finding HCF & LCM with prime factorisations' bit
    then here its enough to say:

    18 is always into 90, so we just have to check 48 and 90:

    48: 2 * 2 * 2 * 2 * 3
    90: 2 * ..............* 3 * 3 * 5
    _________________________

    ................................ 15


    pretty nice. thanks
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    (Original post by Kneechuh)
    Here's a good page

    Scroll to the: 'Finding HCF & LCM with prime factorisations' bit
    Cheers.
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    Sorry if I missed this (Can't be bothered to read through all 30 pages :P), but what else are people doing to prepare for the test (Besides past papers, that is)?

    I've done both the past papers, read a critical thinking book and making my way through the useful bits of a logic book... but am running out of things to do, so if anyone has an suggestions that'd be great .

    Oh and PPE at Jesus .
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    (Original post by TopSlacker)
    Sorry if I missed this (Can't be bothered to read through all 30 pages :P), but what else are people doing to prepare for the test (Besides past papers, that is)?

    I've done both the past papers, read a critical thinking book and making my way through the useful bits of a logic book... but am running out of things to do, so if anyone has an suggestions that'd be great .

    Oh and PPE at Jesus .
    I think that's more than enough :p:

    All I've done is the specimen so far. I'm gonna do the 2008 paper on Monday or something :cool:
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    Hi folks

    Just doing a few CIE test specimens and I keep stumbling over the difference between the questions asking "Which of the following is a conclusion that can be drawn from the above passage?" and "Which one of the following conclusions is best supported by the passage above?" ...Do you go about these questions in an identical manner? I always catch myself thinking that a conclusion means that there can be several wich always puts me off somewhat. Obviously you can only choose one answer but I would like to know whether both simply just mean "Which is the conclusion fitting the above reasons" . Maybe some of you get the nature of these critical thinking tasks a bit better than I do possibly having had some experience with this in the past. I live in Germany and haven't really encountered this kind of test before
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    (Original post by Kneechuh)
    I think that's more than enough :p:

    All I've done is the specimen so far. I'm gonna do the 2008 paper on Monday or something :cool:
    Haha, fair enough! I'm just so used to cramming so much crap in for exams, it feels like I've done next to nothing for this one :p:.
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    (Original post by Kneechuh)
    I think that's more than enough :p:

    All I've done is the specimen so far. I'm gonna do the 2008 paper on Monday or something :cool:
    i have done absolutely nothing! althouggh i bought the textbook and printed off the papers! im gonna spend 2mro and friday prepping!
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    (Original post by PGtips92)
    Cheers.
    Thanks i get it now.

    Btww guys on the 2008 paper here http://www.admissionstests.cambridge...ion_1_2008.pdf

    can someone please explain to me how question 14 could possibly be E? Surely it must be C because that thin diagonal line and the cross can never meet given their places on the net?? I don't get it!!
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    (Original post by Merk that Sike of a Mike)
    Thanks i get it now.

    Btww guys on the 2008 paper here http://www.admissionstests.cambridge...ion_1_2008.pdf

    can someone please explain to me how question 14 could possibly be E? Surely it must be C because that thin diagonal line and the cross can never meet given their places on the net?? I don't get it!!
    Can't be A (straight lines would always be opposite)
    Can't be B (ditto)
    Can't be C (thin line must always be opposite cross)
    So between D and E. there's probably a reason why it's not D but I can't see it. But E is definitily possible (look at the cut out upside down and you can see why it's E).
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    (Original post by PGtips92)
    Can't be A (straight lines would always be opposite)
    Can't be B (ditto)
    Can't be C (thin line must always be opposite cross)
    So between D and E. there's probably a reason why it's not D but I can't see it. But E is definitily possible (look at the cut out upside down and you can see why it's E).
    Oh woops sorry i just realized i completely mis-read the question; i thought it said which one can't it be. my bad
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    (Original post by TopSlacker)
    Sorry if I missed this (Can't be bothered to read through all 30 pages :P), but what else are people doing to prepare for the test (Besides past papers, that is)?

    I've done both the past papers, read a critical thinking book and making my way through the useful bits of a logic book... but am running out of things to do, so if anyone has an suggestions that'd be great .

    Oh and PPE at Jesus .
    You've done more than me!! Haha im scared...

    Which logic book did you read? Can you (or anyone) reccomend any logic matieral on the web maybe..? thankss
 
 
 
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