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UNI HELP! [Law]. oxbridge, UCL, nottingham, bristol, durham... Watch

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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    by any chance did you also apply to the other london unis, lse, ucl, QM? how did you decide KCL over them?
    I applied to both LSE and UCL and QM and was rejected by just LSE. I chose to firm KCL over LSE because I was so impressed with the library and location of KCL, and the KCL Student Union. Had it not been for UCL's crammed library/KCL's awesome library, I am not sure which I would have chosen. I also liked the fact that KCL was opposite the Royal Courts or Justice, and in the legal heart of the world, really. It is also opposite LSE and next to all the good legal book shops. Bloomsbury where UCL is situated was very nice but I went with my instincts.....

    Academically there really isn't much of a difference between the three unis. UCL are apparently more modern in their approach in that they teach modules unique to their law school. LSE and KCL may be said to be more traditional. LSE students work more by themself apparently. All are the same standard really. Location matters when choosing between them more.

    Quees Mary wasn't really seen to be percieved as highly academically as KCL and the area is far less impressive. It is a campus university and does offer many of London's advantages without many of the drawbacks, but I do not care about whether a university is classed as campus or not. If the diggs are good and the location is good then that's all that bothers me. . .

    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    oh and before i forget (assuming you are attending KCL), are there any street dance teams or cheerleading teams? thanks a bunch!
    Yeah KCL has a good dance society. Search for it in Google. I am not actually at KCL btw just have an offer.

    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    by the way, does anyone know how to compare courses in Unis? I know it sounds stupid lol but i actually dont know how for eg i went to the nottingham and oxford sites and looked at law courses for both of them and they had a few bits in common and some without but since ive never studied law before or anything all the names were very foreign to me and ive always thought law was just law anyways

    its just that people have been saying that youre supposed to look at the course and see if its what you want, and actually pick the course over the uni! but i dont know what i want and i dont know what all the names mean and even if i search them up i dont know if thatll be any use.

    help?
    I suppose if you don't know about law you won't be able to tell whether you will enjoy the course.

    If you post a course option up here someone will be able to help explain it. I'll give it a go.

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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    no way! QM has a campus? I thought it was in London with the rest of the other London unis??
    lol do you happen to know if they have a dance team of any sort?
    I don't know about the dance team, but the campus is actually really pretty, with greenery and a canal complete with ducks. Also, when you come out of the campus, you're in Mile End / Bow, which is a plus for shopping.
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    (Original post by audiocity)
    I applied to both LSE and UCL and QM and was rejected by just LSE. I chose to firm KCL over LSE because I was so impressed with the library and location of KCL, and the KCL Student Union. Had it not been for UCL's crammed library/KCL's awesome library, I am not sure which I would have chosen. I also liked the fact that KCL was opposite the Royal Courts or Justice, and in the legal heart of the world, really. It is also opposite LSE and next to all the good legal book shops. Bloomsbury where UCL is situated was very nice but I went with my instincts.....

    Academically there really isn't much of a difference between the three unis. UCL are apparently more modern in their approach in that they teach modules unique to their law school. LSE and KCL may be said to be more traditional. LSE students work more by themself apparently. All are the same standard really. Location matters when choosing between them more.

    Quees Mary wasn't really seen to be percieved as highly academically as KCL and the area is far less impressive. It is a campus university and does offer many of London's advantages without many of the drawbacks, but I do not care about whether a university is classed as campus or not. If the diggs are good and the location is good then that's all that bothers me. . .



    Yeah KCL has a good dance society. Search for it in Google. I am not actually at KCL btw just have an offer.



    I suppose if you don't know about law you won't be able to tell whether you will enjoy the course.

    If you post a course option up here someone will be able to help explain it. I'll give it a go.


    Thanks! Below is the Law course for Nottingham 'http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/course.php?code=008841'

    Law
    Course overview
    The LLB and the BA (Law) are excellent programmes that meet the demand from highly-qualified students who wish to study law as an academic discipline, irrespective of whether they wish to pursue a career in legal practice. In addition to the study of the foundation subjects of English law, both programmes allow you to specialise in areas of law according to your own interests and future career plans.

    LLB students devote most, if not all, of their time to the study of law, whereas BA (Law) students can spend more of their time on modules outside the School of Law.
    Students registered on either course may apply at the beginning of year two to be transferred on to one of the School's four-year degree courses, which incorporate a year abroad studying the law of that country. Successful students can choose between America, Australia, China, Europe, New Zealand, and South East Asia (see right). However, this is highly competitive and transfer cannot be assumed. The School believes that these degrees will provide an extremely valuable educational and cultural experience. For those intending to follow a legal career, the grounding in different legal systems will prove very attractive to employers and, in particular, the leading international firms of solicitors.


    Year one
    In year one you take Understanding Law, Constitutional Law, Law of Contract, Foundations of Tort (LLB). BA students also take optional modules from outside the School.

    Year two
    In year two you take Land Law, Law of the European Union (LLB only), Criminal Law (BA students will take Foundations of Tort). LLB students take one or two optional law modules while BA students can take up to one third of their subjects from Law option/subsidiary modules.


    Year three
    In year three you take Law of Trusts (BA students will also take Law of the European Union), LLB students will take up to six optional modules while BA students can take up to one half of their subjects from Law option/subsidiary modules.
    Typical Law module options
    Child Law
    Foundations of International Criminal Law
    Human Rights Protection in the UK
    Principles of Commercial Law
    Corporate Management and Control
    Conflict of Laws
    Foundations of Public International Law
    (from a wide range; all modules are subject to change)

    And this ones from Oxford http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...dence/law.html

    1st year (terms 1 and 2) 1st year (term 3),
    2nd and 3rd (4th) years
    Courses
    Criminal law
    Constitutional law
    A Roman introduction to Private law
    Research skills programme
    For those on Course II, who will be going to France, Germany, Italy or Spain, there are also French/German/Italian/Spanish law and language classes during the first six terms. For those going to the Netherlands there are introductory Dutch language courses in the second yearford
    Courses
    Tort law
    Contract law
    Trusts
    Land law
    Administrative law
    Course II: year 3 is spent abroad

    European Union law
    Jurisprudence
    Two optional standard subjects. More information is available on the faculty website

    Assessment
    First University examinations (Moderations)
    Three written papers: one each in Criminal law, Constitutional law and a Roman introduction to Private law
    Assessment
    Final University examinations (Finals):
    Seven compulsory subjects: one written paper each
    Two optional subjects: normally written papers but methods of assessment may vary
    Course II students will also be assessed during their year abroad by the University they attend
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    (Original post by audiocity)
    I applied to both LSE and UCL and QM and was rejected by just LSE. I chose to firm KCL over LSE because I was so impressed with the library and location of KCL, and the KCL Student Union. Had it not been for UCL's crammed library/KCL's awesome library, I am not sure which I would have chosen. I also liked the fact that KCL was opposite the Royal Courts or Justice, and in the legal heart of the world, really. It is also opposite LSE and next to all the good legal book shops. Bloomsbury where UCL is situated was very nice but I went with my instincts.....

    Academically there really isn't much of a difference between the three unis. UCL are apparently more modern in their approach in that they teach modules unique to their law school. LSE and KCL may be said to be more traditional. LSE students work more by themself apparently. All are the same standard really. Location matters when choosing between them more.

    Quees Mary wasn't really seen to be percieved as highly academically as KCL and the area is far less impressive. It is a campus university and does offer many of London's advantages without many of the drawbacks, but I do not care about whether a university is classed as campus or not. If the diggs are good and the location is good then that's all that bothers me. . .



    Yeah KCL has a good dance society. Search for it in Google. I am not actually at KCL btw just have an offer.



    I suppose if you don't know about law you won't be able to tell whether you will enjoy the course.

    If you post a course option up here someone will be able to help explain it. I'll give it a go.


    youve got me really quite interested in KCL now! youre right theyve got a great dance soc. and cheerleading as well. and im starting to think the proximity to law facilities etc might just be worth not having a campus... damn i was just about to ask what the people are like until i rmbed you arent going there yet. :p:

    is KCL more reputable than nottingham you think? looked at a few league charts and nottinghams seemed to have shot up but im actually worried that that just might be a fluke thing whereas KCL has had a long history of being one of the top

    thanks!
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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    youve got me really quite interested in KCL now! youre right theyve got a great dance soc. and cheerleading as well. and im starting to think the proximity to law facilities etc might just be worth not having a campus... damn i was just about to ask what the people are like until i rmbed you arent going there yet. :p:

    is KCL more reputable than nottingham you think? looked at a few league charts and nottinghams seemed to have shot up but im actually worried that that just might be a fluke thing whereas KCL has had a long history of being one of the top

    thanks!
    yes KCL is regarded certainly as highly as Nottingham, however I can't really think of any criteria to base this on, apart from 'common knowledge'... league tables are given a random weighting and don't really mean much since they change from year-to-year. however, given that a prospective student could see themself in the city, KCL would be the definite smart choice.

    I can't help much with the course options but I'll try. Every qualifying law degree teaches 7 main areas. Then options are offered so the student can choose the more interesting or relevant areas. For example if you were going to apply to a Civil Law set, no doubt you would be better off taking Trusts rather than the History of Law.

    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    Thanks! Below is the Law course for Nottingham 'http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/course.php?code=008841'

    Law
    Course overview
    The LLB and the BA (Law) are excellent programmes that meet the demand from highly-qualified students who wish to study law as an academic discipline, irrespective of whether they wish to pursue a career in legal practice. In addition to the study of the foundation subjects of English law, both programmes allow you to specialise in areas of law according to your own interests and future career plans.

    LLB students devote most, if not all, of their time to the study of law, whereas BA (Law) students can spend more of their time on modules outside the School of Law.
    Students registered on either course may apply at the beginning of year two to be transferred on to one of the School's four-year degree courses, which incorporate a year abroad studying the law of that country. Successful students can choose between America, Australia, China, Europe, New Zealand, and South East Asia (see right). However, this is highly competitive and transfer cannot be assumed. The School believes that these degrees will provide an extremely valuable educational and cultural experience. For those intending to follow a legal career, the grounding in different legal systems will prove very attractive to employers and, in particular, the leading international firms of solicitors.


    Year one
    In year one you take Understanding Law, Constitutional Law, Law of Contract, Foundations of Tort (LLB). BA students also take optional modules from outside the School.

    1) Constitutional Law is a funny one because as far as I know only places like America and France have a written constitution. UK law operates under precedent (that the case decided before will decide the new case, all facts being equal). I assume that the constitution (all things written down) refers to the original Magna Carta (1215) which laid out the first rules of law. It would also refer to how Parliament delegates powers, and other interesting areas of core legal importance.
    2) Understanding law would be learning how to answer questions and look up information.
    3) Contract law - what makes a contract, when can a contract be void, dealing with several parties in a contract, etc (can be quite good I've heard)
    4) Foundations of tort - I think Tort includes any wrong not involving Contract or Negligence. So nuisance, assaults in civil law, and more.

    Looks like a solid (and hard) first year then.


    Year two
    In year two you take Land Law, Law of the European Union (LLB only), Criminal Law (BA students will take Foundations of Tort). LLB students take one or two optional law modules while BA students can take up to one third of their subjects from Law option/subsidiary modules.

    I've heard land law is HELL, you have to deal with neighbour disputes (arguments over land) and there's probably more reasons it's seen as dull too.
    Law of the EU is mostly fishing quotas I've heard... so not as exciting as it might sound, but certainly the module I am looking forward to most.
    Criminal law is good fun. the OAPA Act and Homicide Act are all I've really read though, but I do like Criminal and I think most do too.


    Year three
    In year three you take Law of Trusts (BA students will also take Law of the European Union), LLB students will take up to six optional modules while BA students can take up to one half of their subjects from Law option/subsidiary modules.
    Typical Law module options
    Child Law
    Foundations of International Criminal Law
    Human Rights Protection in the UK
    Principles of Commercial Law
    Corporate Management and Control
    Conflict of Laws
    Foundations of Public International Law
    (from a wide range; all modules are subject to change)
    The options above are no way near as extensive as King's. At King's the list just goes on and on. And I don't think they really offer and good modules. Philosophy of law seems to be missing allthough 'Conflict of laws' is probably close. No History of Law either which is supposed to be one of the more fun options. I think Commercial Law is the law used in commerce, between plc's, in business contracts, exclusion clauses etc.
    And this ones from Oxford http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...dence/law.html

    1st year (terms 1 and 2) 1st year (term 3),
    2nd and 3rd (4th) years
    Courses
    Criminal law
    Constitutional law
    A Roman introduction to Private law
    Research skills programme
    For those on Course II, who will be going to France, Germany, Italy or Spain, there are also French/German/Italian/Spanish law and language classes during the first six terms. For those going to the Netherlands there are introductory Dutch language courses in the second yearford
    Courses
    Tort law
    Contract law
    Trusts
    Land law
    Administrative law
    Course II: year 3 is spent abroad

    European Union law
    Jurisprudence
    Two optional standard subjects. More information is available on the faculty website

    Assessment
    First University examinations (Moderations)
    Three written papers: one each in Criminal law, Constitutional law and a Roman introduction to Private law
    Assessment
    Final University examinations (Finals):
    Seven compulsory subjects: one written paper each
    Two optional subjects: normally written papers but methods of assessment may vary
    Course II students will also be assessed during their year abroad by the University they attend
    Oxford's course is pretty much perfectly designed to be interesting and academic.

    I think Nottingham's course looks abit boring compaired to others.

    Sorry I can't really help, it's because I don't really know myself :P
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    The courses listed on the web-site for year 3 at Nottingham aren't particularly mainstream: it looks like there is actually a greater choice, though it probably depends on the actual year.

    FYI, Conflict of Laws is private international law: e.g. what happens when you have a contract between a Frech and a Canadian company governed by Australian law and litigated in Saudi Arabia.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    The courses listed on the web-site for year 3 at Nottingham aren't particularly mainstream: it looks like there is actually a greater choice, though it probably depends on the actual year.

    FYI, Conflict of Laws is private international law: e.g. what happens when you have a contract between a Frech and a Canadian company governed by Australian law and litigated in Saudi Arabia.
    Under your username says 'PS helper'. I'm hoping that means Personal statement? just that im doing mine right now and I could use some help I'm applying for law too. Tried PMing you but I think your msg box is full?
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    Does anyone happen to know if reccomendations are needed from teachers for UK unis? if so, how many? is this part of the UCAS app?
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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    Under your username says 'PS helper'. I'm hoping that means Personal statement? just that im doing mine right now and I could use some help I'm applying for law too. Tried PMing you but I think your msg box is full?
    There's a PS Help forum, post it in there and I'll take a look

    Its a private forum, only PS Helper people (you have to prove that you are at/already have been to uni to be one) can see
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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    Thanks for the info!
    Sorry about that-- new to the site.

    Is there a big difference between campus and no-campus? not so much the convenience of a city-life but how the people are, like are they less friendly, as into the school... of course this would have to be a gross generalization...

    Right now I think I mainly have to choose between Bristol, Nottingham, Warwick, Birmingham I think
    pros and cons?



    also if anyone knows anything about a dance team at their uni...
    cos msot of the dance programs i looked at on the website seemed to be more contemporary, ballet, jazz etc
    not so much of a street dance scene?
    Right, those are great choices. You shouldn't discard Oxford. Go for it, if its your dream.

    About dance. This is one of those specific questions which very few people will be able to answer, probably none. Unless, you have a friend ,on site, who can get that sort of information for you. British universities have so many societies to choose from. From football to chess . From a Russian society to a Nigerian one. Therefore, you will never know what you may find. I know for sure Stirling Uni has a cheer leading team. A friend of mine goes there.I'm sure some other British universities contain one also. However, this should not be the decisive factor in making your final choice of institution where you will be spending a minimum of 3 years.

    Finally, the pros and cons of Bristol , Warwick and Birmingham. Now, these are now reflections of the various stories I heard from friends and various 'tales' I read on this forum. You should in no way take this seriously. Remember , it is only seeing the cities for yourself that you will be able to finally make your choice.

    Nightlife /social life - that is the main topic of conversation regarding university life, therefore it is one I shall begin with.

    BRISTOL.Great nightlife. Syndicate being one of the biggest clubs in Britain and offering parties of all music tastes. The city has a great mix of foreign and local students but which British city doesn't?

    WARWICK. No nightlife except for student union events organized and the various societies hosting all sorts of parties. You may wish to travel to Birmingham to get a taste of the traditional British clubbing culture. The social life there is great. Lots of societies and plenty of interesting individuals. From future diplomats and bankers to people who wish to work in the theater or the footballing industry.

    BIRMINGHAM. As mentioned above great nightlife. Gatecrasher seems to be the most popular club there. Social life seems to be good also as it is a great university and people feel privileged to be there. Like all the above universities Birmingham has a vast number of societies to join. Making friends will not be hard.

    NOTTINGHAM. Despite a great reputation of having a great Law society and a solid nightlife with Drum'n Bass being the most popular genre there , is that is your music of preference, the 3 students that I have met from Nottingham has left a bad impression on me. No. They were not Nottingham Trent students. A medic and two economists they were and I have never seen anyone drink as much as they do. Perhaps I may be wrong, but maybe being such a brilliant academic and perhaps rigorous institution, Nottingham gets the better of them. Nevertheless, you should search for alternative prospectuses and/or ask current students for a more in depth review of the social life at the university.

    FROM THE ACADEMIC SIDE:

    Now, this is where I can offer very little help. Type the name of your considered university in the search option and write 'law' next to it. You will get plenty of interesting information from the helpful users of this forum.

    All of the above universities contain solid and well established law departments. Nevertheless, here are my impressions of the Warwick, Nottingham and the Bristol law departments.

    WARWICK. As to most of their courses they apply a very practical and contemporary approach. Their law course has often gained a considerable amount of respect and is even mentioned and given significance to , in Robert Hazell's 'The Bar on Trial' , published 31 years ago!

    BRISTOL. Perhaps famed for being purely essay based although this has probably changed over recent years. Like any law course , in any university the LLB at Bristol is famed for being as equally as challenging as it is interesting, especially if family law is of interest to you. Bristol students will be quick to object, and comment on the fact that the university offers quality education in all types of legal specializations.This is true . The university is known for years of academic excellence and quality educations.

    NOTTINGHAM. Many claim their law department specializes in corporate law. This could be true as 2 out of the 10 young city lawyers reviewed on The Times were Nottingham graduates. However, no worries, as with an LLB from this prestigious institution you will not be forced to jump on the bandwagon and go work for a big London corporation. You will be able to try your skills in other area of the legal practice as there are so many to choose.

    What you said about campus and non - campus is what you mentioned later on -is a gross generalization. One might seem friendly to you but hostile to others. It is almost impossible not to make friends when at university. Each uni will have people you will want to meet and people you'll try to avoid. One thing is for sure, you should visit the 4 towns you mentioned and decide for yourself.

    Hope this helps.

    M.
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    As a former Bristol law student only attend if you want your university experience to be ceaseless toil Well I suppose its a kind of university experience....:eek3:

    I'm probably not the best to sell the Bristol course but here goes. Its very black letter, very essay based. Its great if you want to go and do the LPC/BVC afterwards. The department is housed in a grand gothic building and its great for living out something close to your Oxbridge dreams despite the fact you were rejected :-) Law Soc puts lots on - ample oppertunity for CV polishing

    The city is very cosmopolitan and there are lots of internationals. If clubbing is your thing you are well catered for. As far as teaching goes. The academics don't have time of day for you, even the postgrads loathe undergraduates
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    (Original post by myriadofatoms)
    Right, those are great choices. You shouldn't discard Oxford. Go for it, if its your dream.

    About dance. This is one of those specific questions which very few people will be able to answer, probably none. Unless, you have a friend ,on site, who can get that sort of information for you. British universities have so many societies to choose from. From football to chess . From a Russian society to a Nigerian one. Therefore, you will never know what you may find. I know for sure Stirling Uni has a cheer leading team. A friend of mine goes there.I'm sure some other British universities contain one also. However, this should not be the decisive factor in making your final choice of institution where you will be spending a minimum of 3 years.

    Finally, the pros and cons of Bristol , Warwick and Birmingham. Now, these are now reflections of the various stories I heard from friends and various 'tales' I read on this forum. You should in no way take this seriously. Remember , it is only seeing the cities for yourself that you will be able to finally make your choice.

    Nightlife /social life - that is the main topic of conversation regarding university life, therefore it is one I shall begin with.

    BRISTOL.Great nightlife. Syndicate being one of the biggest clubs in Britain and offering parties of all music tastes. The city has a great mix of foreign and local students but which British city doesn't?

    WARWICK. No nightlife except for student union events organized and the various societies hosting all sorts of parties. You may wish to travel to Birmingham to get a taste of the traditional British clubbing culture. The social life there is great. Lots of societies and plenty of interesting individuals. From future diplomats and bankers to people who wish to work in the theater or the footballing industry.

    BIRMINGHAM. As mentioned above great nightlife. Gatecrasher seems to be the most popular club there. Social life seems to be good also as it is a great university and people feel privileged to be there. Like all the above universities Birmingham has a vast number of societies to join. Making friends will not be hard.

    NOTTINGHAM. Despite a great reputation of having a great Law society and a solid nightlife with Drum'n Bass being the most popular genre there , is that is your music of preference, the 3 students that I have met from Nottingham has left a bad impression on me. No. They were not Nottingham Trent students. A medic and two economists they were and I have never seen anyone drink as much as they do. Perhaps I may be wrong, but maybe being such a brilliant academic and perhaps rigorous institution, Nottingham gets the better of them. Nevertheless, you should search for alternative prospectuses and/or ask current students for a more in depth review of the social life at the university.

    FROM THE ACADEMIC SIDE:

    Now, this is where I can offer very little help. Type the name of your considered university in the search option and write 'law' next to it. You will get plenty of interesting information from the helpful users of this forum.

    All of the above universities contain solid and well established law departments. Nevertheless, here are my impressions of the Warwick, Nottingham and the Bristol law departments.

    WARWICK. As to most of their courses they apply a very practical and contemporary approach. Their law course has often gained a considerable amount of respect and is even mentioned and given significance to , in Robert Hazell's 'The Bar on Trial' , published 31 years ago!

    BRISTOL. Perhaps famed for being purely essay based although this has probably changed over recent years. Like any law course , in any university the LLB at Bristol is famed for being as equally as challenging as it is interesting, especially if family law is of interest to you. Bristol students will be quick to object, and comment on the fact that the university offers quality education in all types of legal specializations.This is true . The university is known for years of academic excellence and quality educations.

    NOTTINGHAM. Many claim their law department specializes in corporate law. This could be true as 2 out of the 10 young city lawyers reviewed on The Times were Nottingham graduates. However, no worries, as with an LLB from this prestigious institution you will not be forced to jump on the bandwagon and go work for a big London corporation. You will be able to try your skills in other area of the legal practice as there are so many to choose.

    What you said about campus and non - campus is what you mentioned later on -is a gross generalization. One might seem friendly to you but hostile to others. It is almost impossible not to make friends when at university. Each uni will have people you will want to meet and people you'll try to avoid. One thing is for sure, you should visit the 4 towns you mentioned and decide for yourself.

    Hope this helps.

    M.
    WOW. thanks a whole bunch. this is awesome!! sorry for the late reply i didnt see this til just now. which uni to you go to btw if you dont mind me asking? also, do you have any of the same info on UCL, LSE and KCL? ive thought about what you said about campus and non-campus and decided youre right, and so i should give london unis a chance thanks again!
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    (Original post by Dan)
    As a former Bristol law student only attend if you want your university experience to be ceaseless toil Well I suppose its a kind of university experience....:eek3:

    I'm probably not the best to sell the Bristol course but here goes. Its very black letter, very essay based. Its great if you want to go and do the LPC/BVC afterwards. The department is housed in a grand gothic building and its great for living out something close to your Oxbridge dreams despite the fact you were rejected :-) Law Soc puts lots on - ample oppertunity for CV polishing

    The city is very cosmopolitan and there are lots of internationals. If clubbing is your thing you are well catered for. As far as teaching goes. The academics don't have time of day for you, even the postgrads loathe undergraduates
    sorry- this may just be me being stupid but whats tha about the 'black letter'? lol dont get that. also what is LPC and BVC???? thanks!
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    (Original post by bittersweet.xox)
    sorry- this may just be me being stupid but whats tha about the 'black letter'? lol dont get that. also what is LPC and BVC???? thanks!
    By black letter I mean law at Bristol is very much learning law by reference to statutes/cases which you learn and later regurgitate in an examation. You might ask isn't all law like that? Well there are more sociolgical subjects where you might ask questions like "Why is the rape conviction rate so low?" or "Why do miscarriages of justice occur in the legal system?" Bristol considers these a little wishy washy and doesnt place to much emphasis on them and instead focuses on an ADVANCED Contract module, two compulsary property/land modules and of course Jurisprudence.

    LPC = legal practice course (what you to if you want to sell your soul to a big law firm)
    BVC= Bar vocational course (what you to if you want to be a barrister)
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    Thanks everyone for the help -- but I think Ive decided on London unis in general i might start a new thread specifically on London unis and see what i get! Thanks again.
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    (Original post by jkyng1)
    yes really tight chinese society but i prefer mixing with other internationals..
    well as long as you get the grades they asked for in AS and have a strong PS is fine, LNAT isn't that important.
    What grades do they ask for in As? (notts)

    I'm applying there this year
 
 
 
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