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    Damn Amazon, class action law suit anyone?
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    Definitely didn't see this coming *rolls eyes* Lolling at all the people who got excited at their 'discounted' iPods.
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    (Original post by Tango Freakster)
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    Shame. Fool.
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    Damn IT Hardware haven't replied to my reply yet lol.
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    If its too good to be true then it probably is.
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    Well there's nothing legally that says that they have to sell it to you at that price, therefore you should have seen this one coming. :p:
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    I can't honestly believe you're all quite angry that your desire for ridiculously underpriced items has been refused. Do you know how much the company would lose if they gave in to every single person's demands?
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    To all those who are saying that they've been charged, have they got an entry on their statement stating Amazon (or the third party seller) have taken £13.13 or has your balance dropped by £13.13 and nothing appeared on your statement? For the latter, you need to understand the difference between a charge and an authorisation. In which case, then the 3rd party seller is correct, you have not been charged.
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    (Original post by jayshah31)
    To all those who are saying that they've been charged, have they got an entry on their statement stating Amazon (or the third party seller) have taken £13.13 or has your balance dropped by £13.13 and nothing appeared on your statement? For the latter, you need to understand the difference between a charge and an authorisation. In which case, then the 3rd party seller is correct, you have not been charged.
    It's shown up as a debit to Amazon EU on my statement. This is what I'm saying. I'm not dumb; I can tell the difference between available and actual balance.
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    (Original post by AP_89)
    Damn Amazon, class action law suit anyone?
    Go for it!! See how far you get when they show you their T&C....
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    This has happened before with Amazon, they were selling a HP computer about 4 years ago worth like £1,800 for £180, they had to refund everyone and didn't release any of them.

    a similar thing happened when I tried to buy an MP3 player (admitedly not an ipod) about 6 years ago it should have been £250 and was on amazon for £120 they stopped me from buying it after i'd already purchased it.
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    (Original post by bigmo7)
    Go for it!! See how far you get when they show you their T&C....
    It was sold from a third party hence the contract was completed after the first email, according to their T&C. Can someone explain how they can argue otherwise??
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    (Original post by Clements-)
    It's shown up as a debit to Amazon EU on my statement. This is what I'm saying. I'm not dumb; I can tell the difference between available and actual balance.
    I don't see why you're kicking up a fuss over this. Just wait for a refund, you knew the chances of you getting the device were slim in the first place and once a charge is placed they cannot be refunded instantly.
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    (Original post by jayshah31)
    I don't see why you're kicking up a fuss over this. Just wait for a refund, you knew the chances of you getting the device were slim in the first place and once a charge is placed they cannot be refunded instantly.
    Duh. I think pretty much everyone here knew the chances were slim. We only bought it cos there was nothing to lose.
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    So glad this failed as i would have been livid for missing it.

    Unlucky peeps.
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    Legally, its controversial. People saying "its definitely OK because of the T&Cs" or "its definitely an invitation to treat" are just wrong.

    Though you would have to take it all the way; and your chances of succeeding would be in the region of 20-30%.
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    (Original post by AP_89)
    It was sold from a third party hence the contract was completed after the first email, according to their T&C. Can someone explain how they can argue otherwise??
    Well if your so sure...why not?
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    (Original post by AP_89)
    It was sold from a third party hence the contract was completed after the first email, according to their T&C. Can someone explain how they can argue otherwise??
    Another escape route is the English doctrine of mistake. If people knew or should have known that the price was wrong, they can't enforce the contract.

    Amazon's T&Cs say that there is no binding contract until they send the e-mail saying the item has been dispatched. The e-mail confirming the order is supposedly just for information and has no legal effect.

    The T&Cs aren't actually that important here. T&Cs don't govern anything until you actually have a contract: they can't decide when there is an offer or when an offer is accepted. Any term saying something along the lines of "we decide whether there is a contract or not" is unenforceable under something called the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Another escape route is the English doctrine of mistake. If people knew or should have known that the price was wrong, they can't enforce the contract.

    Amazon's T&Cs say that there is no binding contract until they send the e-mail saying the item has been dispatched. The e-mail confirming the order is supposedly just for information and has no legal effect.

    The T&Cs aren't actually that important here. T&Cs don't govern anything until you actually have a contract: they can't decide when there is an offer or when an offer is accepted. Any term saying something along the lines of "we decide whether there is a contract or not" is unenforceable under something called the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations.
    'Please note that for items ordered from Amazon.co.uk this e-mail is only an acknowledgement of receipt of your order and your contract to purchase these items is not complete until we send you an e-mail notifying you that the items have been dispatched to you. For items purchased from third parties in Marketplace, this e-mail confirms the completion of your contract to purchase those items.'

    See, that's where I think a lot of people got confused because you'd be correct if it were from Amazon but they state here that the confirmation email is the contract completion as opposed to requiring a dispatch notice.

    As for the first bit, yeah, someone said in the thread the other day that if the mistake is obvious, then the contract isn't enforced.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Another escape route is the English doctrine of mistake. If people knew or should have known that the price was wrong, they can't enforce the contract.

    Amazon's T&Cs say that there is no binding contract until they send the e-mail saying the item has been dispatched. The e-mail confirming the order is supposedly just for information and has no legal effect.

    The T&Cs aren't actually that important here. T&Cs don't govern anything until you actually have a contract: they can't decide when there is an offer or when an offer is accepted. Any term saying something along the lines of "we decide whether there is a contract or not" is unenforceable under something called the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations.
    Thanks for that. I'm aware of Mistake, it's vague but yes of course we're all aware it was in fact a mistake, so fair enough.
 
 
 
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