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    The DCSF are wanting to encourage people to study maths and science subjects.

    So here's a question for those of you studying/have studied sciences at A Level or beyond and for those of you considering them, it's something to think about.


    What jobs can I get into if I study science?

    What have you ended up doing for a job after studying sciences? Even if you 'scientisit', what does that really mean? What can you end up doing for a career if you study science?



    Find out more from about science and maths and see where they can take you...
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    Many many many things...
    Doctor? Pharmacist? Therapist? Industrial manufacture? Food industry? Physicist? Banking?

    The field is massive.
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    I take umbrage that this is specifically in the chemistry section :p:

    But exactly as EVS said, it can be broadly lumped into categories like research/inustry scientist jobs, healthcare and public service related jobs, and non-science jobs that rely on the underlying skills developed through studying a science. Like anlaytical thinking, logic and mathmatical ability etc, and they can be extremely wide ranging. I know of someone who took a biology degree and is currently working a high powered finance job and so on.

    And of course, there's always teaching
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    As well as being very enjoyable, studying science, technology, engineering or maths subjects after you’re 16 will give you many skills that will be useful in a wide range of careers. You will develop problem solving, team working, numeracy and creativity skills, all of which can be used in a variety of different careers.

    You can check out the wide variety of opportunities through www.futuremorph.org or www.connexionsdirect-direct.com/jobs4u
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    (Original post by DCSF)
    As well as being very enjoyable, studying science, technology, engineering or maths subjects after you’re 16 will give you many skills that will be useful in a wide range of careers. You will develop problem solving, team working, numeracy and creativity skills, all of which can be used in a variety of different careers.

    You can check out the wide variety of opportunities through www.futuremorph.org or www.connexionsdirect-direct.com/jobs4u
    Someones taking the Power of Information Taskforce to heart - I like it
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    You could work for DCSF.

    Really it would be easier to have a thread on what you couldn't (or would find hard to do).
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    (Original post by DCSF)
    As well as being very enjoyable, studying science, technology, engineering or maths subjects after you’re 16 will give you many skills that will be useful in a wide range of careers. You will develop problem solving, team working, numeracy and creativity skills, all of which can be used in a variety of different careers.

    You can check out the wide variety of opportunities through www.futuremorph.org or www.connexionsdirect-direct.com/jobs4u
    All very true. Even for those who don't want to progress into a scientific career, science A-levels or post-16 education in maths and science will be incredibly useful for most pursuits. :yes:

    What I want to know is why the DCSF is so obsessed with promoting maths and science in particular. :confused:
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    What I want to know is why the DCSF is so obsessed with promoting maths and science in particular. :confused:
    Fewer and fewer people are taking these subjects at A level. According to the press, they're seen as harder subjects. Of course, the press talks **** all the time.
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    (Original post by Toiletpaper8)
    Fewer and fewer people are taking these subjects at A level.
    More people are taking them at uni.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    More people are taking them at uni.
    And once you remove the social sciences, computer science, medicine [useful but not really transferable],Applied Science, Environmental Science, and non-rigorous degree courses that will accept just about anyone, is that number still going up?

    If so, why have there been high-profile closures of Chemistry and Physics departments over the last few years?
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    (Original post by Game_boy)
    And once you remove the social sciences, computer science, medicine [useful but not really transferable],Applied Science, Environmental Science, and non-rigorous degree courses that will accept just about anyone, is that number still going up?

    If so, why have there been high-profile closures of Chemistry and Physics departments over the last few years?
    Certainly the numbers of chemistry students has been, and I thought physics numbers had been increasing too.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...ities-students

    'The Royal Society of Chemistry said it was pleased to see the number of chemistry undergraduates rise above 4,000 for the first time in over a decade to 4,009 in 2008.'

    They closed because they were less profitable than arts courses.
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    To counter the comment above from Game_Boy, Environmental Science isn't necessarily non-rigorous and non-transferable. I did an Environmental Science undergrad and I'm studying MSc Water Resources Technology now at Birmingham, it's specialised and useful. I already have work abroad lined up.

    I think Biology, Environmental Science or Chemistry are good subjects to take if you want to study 'Science' but not sure exactly where to go with it. If you do have a specific area in mind, e.g. Immunology or Pharmacology you will be better off (as you'll get there quicker) doing a more specialised degree. On that note I know how terrible supposed career officers are in schools, especially when it comes to science jobs. You will have to do your own research if you want to make an informed choice while you're still at school. I remember being 18 and just thinking 'oh well I quite like nature so I'll do Environmental Science'....You can probably put more thought into it than I did.

    Also, I'd like to point out to students reading this that I didn't even study A-level maths and I'm now doing engineering based modules at a masters level. Yes, it would have been very useful for me to take A-level maths (I did take A-level physics) but I have managed to catch up.

    The point I'm making is although they're possibly 'harder' than Business Studies and so-called mickey mouse subjects they're definitely not impossible and I was put off taking maths because I'd only done the Intermediate GCSE paper! But I know now I could've easily succeeded. My school was very adept at grouping the weaker students into exams they would definitely pass rather than challenging them.

    It's worth pursuing maths and science because the jobs are out there and a lot more interesting than working in some stuffy office/call centre (unless you're into that kind of thing....). I'm a girl as well just in case there are any females who think their little brains aren't up to it because they have a fanny or some such nonsense.

    Thanks.
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    Didn't bother reading any of the other posts but I was talking to the man who I was "executive shadowing" and he was telling me about degrees in science.

    He did a degree in chemical engineering which is like a mixture of chemistry obviously but also some business. He is now a manager in a chemical company.

    He told me that alot of people who have done chemistry also end up in the City.

    The other guy I was talking to had a phd in chemistry and is now part of a new research company funded by the larger company on the site. The thing they were working on was more oriented towards engineering than physics than chemistry, so I think the message from this post is that if you do a science degree you do not become limited to just that science, but also learn alot of other skills which can be applied to other areas.
 
 
 
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