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    Japan's Prime Minister, Taro Aso, called an election today. Will we finally see the end of the long rule of the LDP and the beginning of a new period of rule by the DPJ? Will a DPJ government bring some rejuvenation to the rather staid Japanese politics, or will it be more of the same?
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    Bloody hell, how many PMs does Japan get through?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Bloody hell, how many PMs does Japan get through?
    Frequent changes of leadership seem to be a characteristic of ruling parties that have become lifeless and outlived their welcome.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Frequent changes of leadership seem to be a characteristic of ruling parties that have become lifeless and outlived their welcome.
    Then why is the Labour party still in power, they've more than outlived their welcome haha

    I find it quite odd that even under a proportional electoral system Japan is still largely a one-party dominante state. Although, it could go either way. the LDP won massively in the 2005 House of Reps elections but the DPJ won, admittedly not so convincingly, in the 2007 councillor elections. It could definitely go either way. Personally I think that the LDP will get it this time, I don't think that the DPJ have a large enough appeal to unseat them. Just one viewpoint though

    By the way, thanks for a v. interesting thread
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    It'll be interesting to see which way the NKP goes, though their influence seems to be on the wane. Apparently, the communists are gaining support and are challenging the NKP's position as the third party.
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    (Original post by Edenr)
    It'll be interesting to see which way the NKP goes, though their influence seems to be on the wane. Apparently, the communists are gaining support and are challenging the NKP's position as the third party.
    I could see the communists taking over the NKP as the 3rd party myself. They've never really been far behind them in elections, and with the recession you have to wonder how many people will look for an alternative to capitalism - the communists definitely offer that. And it would also be interesting to see if China tries to influence the election at all by supporting the communist party.
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    Japan seems to change their PM every other year.
    The LDP has held the Japanese gov't for a long time, I wonder if that's change.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Japan's Prime Minister, Taro Aso, called an election today. Will we finally see the end of the long rule of the LDP and the beginning of a new period of rule by the DPJ? Will a DPJ government bring some rejuvenation to the rather staid Japanese politics, or will it be more of the same?
    Not surprising, the LDP doesn't even control the upper house anymore. The DPJ are not as liberal as the former Socialists were when they won a hefty control of the Diet back in the early 90's. So I doubt you would see any completely radical changes in power except the odd token show of gesture to some Japan's more smaller worrying matters in order to relieve public tensions. The problem that Japan has if indeed it went for a powerbroke with the DJP is that with the economy of Japan's main traders shot to pieces and North Korea firing missiles across into the Sea of Japan, I would not vote for Hatoyama.

    But then again, voting for Aso feels like a kick in the teeth. The lesser of two wrongs.

    If only Abe hadn't been pushed out of office, Japan seriously wouldn't be having these dilemmas right now.
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    (Original post by chloem257)
    I could see the communists taking over the NKP as the 3rd party myself. They've never really been far behind them in elections, and with the recession you have to wonder how many people will look for an alternative to capitalism - the communists definitely offer that.
    That would only realistically happen if the NKP and the LDP push for further coalition to strengthen the weakening power of the LDP. The communists have actually lost seats in the local Tokyo Metropolitan assembly elections from four years ago, whereas the NKP consolidated their previous ones with no gains. I would say, the DJP are scooping up votes from potential left-centrists within the JCP.

    In the immediate post bubble years, the socialists increased their power in the Diet, yet the LDP still regained final control. As much as the commies are gaining support with the global recession, the keiretsu still control pretty much most of the lateral industrial political complex within Japan. Most of the unions are still tethered by the political hierarchy.
 
 
 
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