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    This is a bit of a dumb question, but I've got all confused now!

    What exactly is the biting point? With my instructor, when I'm pulling away, he tells me to prepare by finding the biting point using the clutch only, into first gear, then handbrake off and we move off using only the clutch, bringing it up slightly higher than what I've considered to be the 'biting point'.

    I'm driving my Dad's car tomorrow and he said that I need to balance between the gas and the clutch to find the biting point, because if I do it only using the clutch it will stall the car.

    So which is it officially?! I suppose if I need to move off on a busier road then I'd need my foot on the gas quicker, but I'm just a bit confused as to what the biting point really is now :confused:
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    For me, the biting point is where I let the clutch pedal come up, then there is a slight drop in revs. You can either see it on the dashboard, and/or feel the car pull forward slightly. I usually put some gas down, but it depends on the car really.


    If I need to move off quicker, I put a bit more gas down than normal, and lift the clutch faster.
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    Its when you feel the car dip as you lift the clutch up. The engine sounds deeper too
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    If you're stationary and you lift your foot slowly off the clutch, you'll know when you've found the biting point because in the central mirror you'll see the car dip slightly. Lift it further from that point and you'll move forwards (and that's when you go down on the accelerator)
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    (Original post by laurenmgbowden)
    This is a bit of a dumb question, but I've got all confused now!

    What exactly is the biting point? With my instructor, when I'm pulling away, he tells me to prepare by finding the biting point using the clutch only, into first gear, then handbrake off and we move off using only the clutch, bringing it up slightly higher than what I've considered to be the 'biting point'.

    I'm driving my Dad's car tomorrow and he said that I need to balance between the gas and the clutch to find the biting point, because if I do it only using the clutch it will stall the car.

    So which is it officially?! I suppose if I need to move off on a busier road then I'd need my foot on the gas quicker, but I'm just a bit confused as to what the biting point really is now :confused:
    Your dad is right, if you don't balance the clutch and the gas pedal, properly, the car WILL stall.

    Firstly POM routine (Prepare -1st gear, Observations - look around to see if it is safe, and Movement -), raise the clutch until the bonnet and the car "rises" a bit. From there press on the gas pedal, but gently and at the same time, while pressing on the gas pedal lift the clutch pedal COMPLETELY, and thats when you move off .
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    If you're struggling just press the accelerator more.
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    Right.

    Essentially, the clutch is able to disconnect the engine from the wheels, long story short. When you have the clutch pedal down, the engine isn't driving the wheels. When the clutch is completely released, the engine has full grip on the wheels. Bite is where you're at that stage where the engine is starting to drive the wheels. You feel a grinding from the car, it will lean against the handbrake or move off if the handbrake isn't on. The stronger the bite, the more these differences are noticeable.

    In a decent diesel or large petrol engine, the engine is inherently more powerful, so the engine is able to drive the car straight off. In the case of a smaller petrol engine, the engine doesn't have the power to shift the car and the engine stalls. Therefore, in a smaller car, you will need to balance the bite with gas, so that once the engine starts trying to drive the wheels the gas will provide the extra power you need to get going.
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    The biting point has been explained well so far. You use it most when stuck in traffic, and parking. My mum said the best way of mastering the biting point is to drive the car in a tight circle verrrrry slowly, without stalling. You need a bit of land space for that, though.
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    (Original post by Laurah5498)
    Its when you feel the car dip as you lift the clutch up. The engine sounds deeper too
    Dip? If you have the handbrake on and you begin to bring up the clutch, the nose of the car will rise.

    It's usually good practice to try and keep the revs roughly steady as you pull away by applying more throttle as the clutch bites. If you can manage this, then you have mastered the biting point. To start with you can just play it by ear; when the revs start to drop just apply a little more throttle. Before long it will be instinctive from the 'feel'. If you're driving a diesel in slow stop-start traffic, you shouldn't necessarily have to use the throttle at all, though.
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    Chiko's explanation is perfect.

    To find the biting point, I was taught to set the gas at about 1500-2000rpm (that's just as a rough guide, don't rely on the rev counter, you'll know what feels right when you get used to it) and then bring my clutch up slowly and gradually, all the while keeping my right foot steady, until I felt the car tense up and heard the noise drop a bit. Then handbrake off and keep bringing the clutch up gradually, then all the way up, and at the same time giving it more gas.

    It took me about a minute to do that at first but you'll find that after you've experienced stop-start traffic and stopping at traffic lights, you'll be able to get into gear, find the biting point and move off in just a few seconds.
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    To combine a lot of other peoples answers about this: the biting point is where the engine is only just 'connected' to the transmission to turn the wheels. The best way to see this in practise (if there's no other traffic around you i.e. you're just about to set off from home/are in a large, empty open space) is to apply the handbrake, set the gas and slowly raise the clutch pedal out. Check the rev counter for the exact moment where the revs drop down - you're at the biting point. (Remember to release the handbrake before trying to move off after you've found the biting point, of course! :p:)
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    It seems a lot of people are telling you to visually spot the biting point by the movement of the car and the revs. Does nobody just find it through the 'feel' of the thing? I know I'm on the biting point because I can feel it through the clutch, and you can feel when you go past it too as you change gear and put your foot on the accelerator again.
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    It seems a lot of people are telling you to visually spot the biting point by the movement of the car and the revs. Does nobody just find it through the 'feel' of the thing? I know I'm on the biting point because I can feel it through the clutch, and you can feel when you go past it too as you change gear and put your foot on the accelerator again.
    Yup. The car I drive doesn't even have a rev counter. It's all about feeling. I think it's gives more pleasure when driving.

    And many cars won't stall if you don't give it gas whilst moving off. If it does you're probably lifting the clutch too quickly. You sometimes have to keep the clutch steady (ie slip it) for a moment to let the car build up momentum.
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    It seems a lot of people are telling you to visually spot the biting point by the movement of the car and the revs. Does nobody just find it through the 'feel' of the thing? I know I'm on the biting point because I can feel it through the clutch, and you can feel when you go past it too as you change gear and put your foot on the accelerator again.
    Yeah, I'm finding it easier to do it that way now but I used to rely on the rev counter and would be annoyed when I couldn't get it at exactly 1500rpm :o:

    As for finding the biting point without gas, it can be done and helps with some manoeuvres. My instructor even calls them "no-gas manouevres", where you control the car with only brake control and clutch control. Helped me loads with an RRC where I was reversing downhill.
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    The biting point is the the point where the engine starts to pull the car. If you're on a slope you'll need the accelerator ...
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    It seems a lot of people are telling you to visually spot the biting point by the movement of the car and the revs. Does nobody just find it through the 'feel' of the thing? I know I'm on the biting point because I can feel it through the clutch, and you can feel when you go past it too as you change gear and put your foot on the accelerator again.
    Of course, but you don't learn that way; it comes with time and practice.
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    It depends on the car. Some need gas to pull off, some don't. The biting point is when the engine 'connects' and the car pulls forward (or the back dips if the handbrake is on), whether it happens with or without gas. You will just get to know whether the cars you drive need gas or not Most new cars, especially with bigger engines I believe, don't need gas to pull off and you can crawl in traffic queues just lifting your clutch. I'm not 100% sure that is to do with engine [i]size[i/] though.
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    (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
    It depends on the car. Some need gas to pull off, some don't. The biting point is when the engine 'connects' and the car pulls forward (or the back dips if the handbrake is on), whether it happens with or without gas. You will just get to know whether the cars you drive need gas or not Most new cars, especially with bigger engines I believe, don't need gas to pull off and you can crawl in traffic queues just lifting your clutch. I'm not 100% sure that is to do with engine [i]size[i/] though.
    It's to do with low end torque; Diesel engines and cars with large engines usually have a lot of it, so they are able to pull away without needing any throttle.
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    Automatics own. :cool:
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    (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
    It depends on the car. Some need gas to pull off, some don't. The biting point is when the engine 'connects' and the car pulls forward (or the back dips if the handbrake is on), whether it happens with or without gas. You will just get to know whether the cars you drive need gas or not Most new cars, especially with bigger engines I believe, don't need gas to pull off and you can crawl in traffic queues just lifting your clutch. I'm not 100% sure that is to do with engine [i]size[i/] though.
    I have a 0.8 petrol and I can do exactly what you describe as 'crawling' through the traffic.
 
 
 
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