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    (Original post by logic123)
    im not totally sure but havng high fatty foods (unsaturated fat type) can lead to gallstones.
    I'm a vegetarian, and had a relatively low fat diet before I started getting symptoms. Sometimes they just happen.
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    I haven't had a scan yet- have to wait till the 17th. A family member has offered to pay for private treatment to speed it up (I have important family events in september and starting uni in october- not to mention getting rid of souce of pain asap!) but will wait to hear about how soon I can get NHS treatment first.

    Have you got your results yet?
    Yeah I had my camera, which came back perfectly healthy! So at least it's ruled out Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis. They took some biopsies to look for microscopic colitis, and I should get the results on the 12th, but every medical professional I've spoken to (other than the surgeon at the Liver clinic) have all suggested it's because I had my gallbladder out and it's caused a bile salt problem. Hopefully, the gastroenterologist on the 12th will think so too and it can actually be investigated!

    All I can suggest with speeding things up, is keep going to A+E. I swear they only admitted me because I made a nuisance of myself there (that and the mind-numbing agony of my last attack) and wanted to get me out of the way, I was there that often!
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    part of the course I'm afraid I'd expect your urine is dark too.
    Entonox wears off in minutes I'm afraid.

    You need paracetamol
    AND
    Ibuprofen
    AND
    Buscopan
    AND
    Cyclizine or Domperidone

    at home ready in case you have another attack
    My GP said no oral painkillers will really be effective during an attack (but I guess the combination of all of those must do something!) The worse thing is that I usually leave the pain untill it is severe before calling an ambulance (because some attacks are short and don't require treatment) and understandably abdo pain is low priority for a paramedic team so they only have to be there within 30 minutes as supposed to 11 minutes. Half an hour of extreme pain is not fun! I scared the hell out of my parents :p:
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    (Original post by pixiepeep)
    Yeah I had my camera, which came back perfectly healthy! So at least it's ruled out Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis. They took some biopsies to look for microscopic colitis, and I should get the results on the 12th, but every medical professional I've spoken to (other than the surgeon at the Liver clinic) have all suggested it's because I had my gallbladder out and it's caused a bile salt problem. Hopefully, the gastroenterologist on the 12th will think so too and it can actually be investigated!

    All I can suggest with speeding things up, is keep going to A+E. I swear they only admitted me because I made a nuisance of myself there (that and the mind-numbing agony of my last attack) and wanted to get me out of the way, I was there that often!
    Well thats good news- although it must be annoying still not knowing for certain what is wrong. Are you still suffering or are the symptoms getting better?
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    Well thats good news- although it must be annoying still not knowing for certain what is wrong. Are you still suffering or are the symptoms getting better?
    I'm getting worse, sadly. I'm getting so dehydrated, despite drinking plenty of fluids, and it's making me really tired all the time, which makes me cranky!

    I'm not sure how I never ended up calling ambulances for my attacks; I think I have a higher pain threshold than I thought, cause I only ever went to hospital 4 times in 10 months, and all of those were in the 2 months running up to my op. I never saw the point when I knew the pain was only going to be there until I managed to get some sleep. Only got given painkillers in hospital twice too.
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    (Original post by pixiepeep)
    I'm getting worse, sadly. I'm getting so dehydrated, despite drinking plenty of fluids, and it's making me really tired all the time, which makes me cranky!

    I'm not sure how I never ended up calling ambulances for my attacks; I think I have a higher pain threshold than I thought, cause I only ever went to hospital 4 times in 10 months, and all of those were in the 2 months running up to my op. I never saw the point when I knew the pain was only going to be there until I managed to get some sleep. Only got given painkillers in hospital twice too.
    What you are going through sounds absolutely horrible

    I aways feel incredibly guilty calling the ambulance but it was not a level of pain I could have manange by myself. The paramedics both times have been amazing despite the fact I always call them out on the last hour of their night shifts. I would love to have been able to be driven to A&E but the truth is I would not have been able to sit in a car seat. My GP and the ambulance crew all said call them again if I get another bad attack (in fact the paramedics said feel free to call us again in 5 minutes after they've gone if the pain starts again!) because it's pain relief I need rather than a medical examination so an ambulance is more useful than a trip to hospital.
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    Well I definitely have gallstones- or more like a big pile of gallgravel! The doctor doing the scan made me roll onto my side and back again so I could see them rolling about It looked similar to a sand timer.
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    They really are the rolling stones!
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    (Original post by Anamaria90)
    They really are the rolling stones!
    Get back to work :p:
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    I was on my lunch break (I'm not now :o: )
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    Well I definitely have gallstones- or more like a big pile of gallgravel! The doctor doing the scan made me roll onto my side and back again so I could see them rolling about It looked similar to a sand timer.
    It's good they know what you've definitely got now, and a good idea of how bad the situation is.

    I remember seeing them on my scan, I had one enormous one and "sludge" (which wasn't really sludge in the end). Was rather surreal!
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    (Original post by pixiepeep)
    It's good they know what you've definitely got now, and a good idea of how bad the situation is.

    I remember seeing them on my scan, I had one enormous one and "sludge" (which wasn't really sludge in the end). Was rather surreal!
    I have hundreds of small ones...I still have the scan of my gallbabies :p:
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    I have hundreds of small ones...I still have the scan of my gallbabies :p:
    Awww, I'm quite jealous, I never got to keep a picture of mine!!! Wish I had! I'd have framed it!!!!
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    I'm having my gallbladder out on sunday What should I expect?
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    I'm having my gallbladder out on sunday What should I expect?
    Well, once you've arrived, been settled in on the ward etc, and when it's your turn, you'll be taken down to the anaesthetic room. You'll probably walk there and climb onto a trolley yourself. The anaesthetist will put a cannula (a small plastic tube) into one of your veins, usually on the back of your hand. There will be a nurse/ODP-type person there to check you're ok and hold your hand if you're nervous. They'll attach you to some monitoring equipment - some sticky labels on your chest to measure your heart rate, and a clip on your finger to measure the oxygen saturation in your blood.

    Once everything's ready, you'll be given an oxygen mask to breathe through, and the anaesthetists will start to give you the medications to make you fall asleep. This usually happens very quickly, though it can seem like ages!

    Once you're off, you'll be wheeled into theatre and put on the table. The op will take about an hour usually, depending on the surgeon. Usually you will have one cut about 1cm long above your tummy button, and 2 or 3 other shorter ones over towards your sides. I could describe the actual op but I'm not sure if that's what you're after!

    Afterwards, you'll wake up in recovery, probably with a mask on your face again, and connected up to monitoring, possibly on a drip. Different people wake up in different ways - some people take a while, some are really quick, some are sick, some (for reasons I don't understand) start crying - so I can't promise what will happen to you, but again there will be a nurse there. Once they're happy with you, they will take you back to the ward for a few hours. Some of the medications can give you amnesia, so how much you remember of recovery will vary - for example, I remember hearing my Mum talking to me in recovery, but don't remember seeing anything until I was being wheeled onto the ward.

    Generally a gallbladder removal is a day-case operation, unless you're done very late in the day. So the surgeons will come round later in the day to have a look at you, and if they're happy you can go home. You may be given some painkillers to take with you, but aside from that you don't need anything else.

    Hope that helps!
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Well, once you've arrived, been settled in on the ward etc, and when it's your turn, you'll be taken down to the anaesthetic room. You'll probably walk there and climb onto a trolley yourself. The anaesthetist will put a cannula (a small plastic tube) into one of your veins, usually on the back of your hand. There will be a nurse/ODP-type person there to check you're ok and hold your hand if you're nervous. They'll attach you to some monitoring equipment - some sticky labels on your chest to measure your heart rate, and a clip on your finger to measure the oxygen saturation in your blood.

    Once everything's ready, you'll be given an oxygen mask to breathe through, and the anaesthetists will start to give you the medications to make you fall asleep. This usually happens very quickly, though it can seem like ages!

    Once you're off, you'll be wheeled into theatre and put on the table. The op will take about an hour usually, depending on the surgeon. Usually you will have one cut about 1cm long above your tummy button, and 2 or 3 other shorter ones over towards your sides. I could describe the actual op but I'm not sure if that's what you're after!

    Afterwards, you'll wake up in recovery, probably with a mask on your face again, and connected up to monitoring, possibly on a drip. Different people wake up in different ways - some people take a while, some are really quick, some are sick, some (for reasons I don't understand) start crying - so I can't promise what will happen to you, but again there will be a nurse there. Once they're happy with you, they will take you back to the ward for a few hours. Some of the medications can give you amnesia, so how much you remember of recovery will vary - for example, I remember hearing my Mum talking to me in recovery, but don't remember seeing anything until I was being wheeled onto the ward.

    Generally a gallbladder removal is a day-case operation, unless you're done very late in the day. So the surgeons will come round later in the day to have a look at you, and if they're happy you can go home. You may be given some painkillers to take with you, but aside from that you don't need anything else.

    Hope that helps!
    Thank you so much! It definitely helps- knowing what will happen is so much better than letting your imagination run wild (I wasn't particularly nervous to begin with but this has defnitely eased any worries!) I can imagine you are/will be an excellent doctor
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    I hope my pain was as tangible as cysts and gall stones.

    Good luck on your op Katie!
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    (Original post by Katie_louise)
    I'm having my gallbladder out on sunday What should I expect?
    I'm glad it's come round so quickly for you!!

    I was wheeled down to theatre, had a number of heart rate monitor pad things stuck on, a blood pressure cuff, and then met my anaesthetist (who, oddly enough, had been my anaesthetist a few months earlier when I had my wisdom teeth removed!!), had a cannula placed in my hand and was out like a light!

    Next thing I remember is waking up in the recovery room and asking for a sip of water. It hurt when I moved ever so slightly, so they gave me more morphine, and then I remember very little of the rest of the afternoon.

    Woke up the next morning, sore but feeling at least 100 times better than I had before the surgery.

    There were 4 incisions, one in my belly button (which took the longest to heal but now is completely invisible), two on my right hand side, one of which is just below my ribcage, the other a few inches below that, and the largest one is just below my breast bone, but that's only about an inch and a half long.

    I was discharged around 2pm the next day (the had originally wanted to keep me a few nights longer because of my infection, but as I'd spent all morning walking around and a lot of the swelling had already gone, and I already looked much much healthier, they agreed I was best off going home). I was given tramadol and paracetamol for the pain, and some antibiotics for the infection, but the only painkillers I took were paracetamol to take the edge off the aching.

    I recommend against lifting anything heavier than a large mug of tea for the first week, and expect to ache lifting things for a while after. I struggled sitting up by myself for about the first week, but once I was up I was fine.

    I had trouble eating anything without nausea for about a week (other than ginger biscuits!)

    Having the runs is really common for the first couple of weeks, but should settle down (I think I'm a bad example here!!!)

    You'll feel so much better afterwards!

    EDIT: RE: anaesthesia - I've always been told you wake up the way you went under, so if you're really on the verge of tears as you go under you may wake up in tears! This happened to me when I had my wisdom teeth out - I was terrified of the needle, so when I woke up I was in floods of tears! It's bizarre.
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    (Original post by pixiepeep)
    [.
    Thanks for letting me know what to expect. I am having private treatment despite me telling family I really didn't mind waiting for NHS (all because of starting uni). I haven't actually had an attack in over a week so it feels a bit ridiculous that I'm going in for surgery. However, what has happened lately is that my appetite has gone and every now and then I feel quite nauseous. I am hoping that my recovery will probably be quicker than yours because I don't have any of the complications you had.
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    Good luck with everything tomorrow/today! Let me know how it goes!!

    Started getting attacks quite often now... cannot wait till I get the call..
 
 
 
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