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    are open univesity degrees taken seriously?

    i am currently studying law at the open unversity and was nearly laughed at by a lady from a "brick" university to try and transfer credit

    is it worth me spending 6 years on an ou degree? i am beginning to have regrets

    has anoyone here found a decent role after studying at the open univesity/ or know anyone who has?

    thanks
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    It is well respected.

    I know somebody who got a degree in computing whilst working in retail and now works as tech support in the house of commons.

    The lady you had that encounter with doesn't really have any merit to judge considering she obviously hasn't studied with the OU or actually been an employer (assumuption).

    From people I have spoken to, including my employer, OU qualifications show dedication and ability to organise and regiment your own study as opposed to being told what to do at a brick uni.

    A degree is a degree at the end of the day.
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    (Original post by ½+½)
    It is well respected.

    I know somebody who got a degree in computing whilst working in retail and now works as tech support in the house of commons.

    The lady you had that encounter with doesn't really have any merit to judge considering she obviously hasn't studied with the OU or actually been an employer (assumuption).

    From people I have spoken to, including my employer, OU qualifications show dedication and ability to organise and regiment your own study as opposed to being told what to do at a brick uni.

    A degree is a degree at the end of the day.
    Hear hear
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    It is very well respected.


    Don't worry about the lady. No matter which uni you go to, there will always be someone who thinks theirs is better.
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    As the others have said, don't worry much about that lady. I posted this in another thread and it should help ease your worries.


    Re: Open University - Good or bad?

    I'm a recent graduate of the OU and I had similiar concerns myself when applying to do an MSc - actually in the end I was accepted at Imperial, King's and Manchester, and the admissions tutors I met seemed quite enthusiastic about the OU, the quality of the degree, and the work ethic that part-time/home study students acquire during their studies.

    I also work at a big 4 accountancy firm and all the feedback I have had regarding the OU has been positive, even the partners here are impressed.

    Like most universities there are options for a "softer" degree, but in general the named hons degrees should be considered the equal of a degree from a good "brick" university
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    Unfortunately you get used to those types of attitude, 'well it isn't a real degree though is it?' is a pretty common statement. Your degree (if you stick with it) will be worth that of any other. The skills you develop with the OU also look good on a CV, working on your own shows that you are organised, motivated and have self-discipline. One thing that I am starting to think about is voluntary work that involves some sort of team work to balance everything out.
    See this article;
    http://www.notgoingtouni.co.uk/advic...s-views-on-ou/
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    What about respect levels for the BA Hons Open?
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    (Original post by Johntheman)
    What about respect levels for the BA Hons Open?
    This would completely depend on the type of job or university your applying for. I know that as a general rule named degrees are preferred but if you can prove that the courses you have taken give you enough knowledge to go into employment or postgraduate study you should be fine. BA are normally quite different to Bsc degrees but this will depend on the courses that your degree consists of.
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    (Original post by lincs_b)
    BA are normally quite different to Bsc degrees but this will depend on the courses that your degree consists of.

    In what way, other than arts and sciences?
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    (Original post by AnnB)
    In what way, other than arts and sciences?
    It depends on the uni, the courses that make up a Bsc will typically contain more maths and problem solving skills. BA courses will typically contain more essay structured work. Cambridge however only offers BA degrees so it does really depend on where you study.
    Those with Bsc statistically go on to earn more money and supposedly find work more easily (can't find a link to the article) but then you wouldn't expect on average those who are qualified in the history of arts to earn more than an average chemist really.
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    But surely if those things people have said about OU being held in high regard mean a BA Open degree is going to be an eye catcher?
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    The thing with the Open degree is that it isn't a named degree, and as such the content may not be as focused and relevant towards a particular subject. Of course it depends what courses make up your degree but on a practical level you'd probably have to spend more time explaining what you covered in interviews and so on in future.
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    I contacted my local uni regarding studying a PGCE with them once completing my OU degree, so I chose the right subject/courses for it. They told me that it needed to be a named degree and not open. So if you have something specific in mind for after the degree its best to look into that and ask relevant people there.
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    (Original post by BattyNora)
    I contacted my local uni regarding studying a PGCE with them once completing my OU degree, so I chose the right subject/courses for it. They told me that it needed to be a named degree and not open. So if you have something specific in mind for after the degree its best to look into that and ask relevant people there.
    The only specific is a job.
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    are open univesity degrees taken seriously?

    The OU was founded by Harold Wilson, one of our greatest peacetime prime ministers. I don't think our government would be subsidizing the OU if it wasn't a "serious" academic institution. Oh by the way, did you know Gordon Brown used to be an OU tutor before he entered the world of politics?

    Here is the standard introductory letter the OU can put together for you should you come across any organizations (usually foreign companies) that may not have heard of the OU.

    Cheerio


    To whom it may concern,

    The Open University was incorporated by Royal Charter in 1969. Like other UK universities, the Open University is independent and autonomous and is financed in the main from Government funds.

    The University’s academic standards are monitored by external examiners appointed from other universities and degree awarding institutions within the United Kingdom. In line with other universities in the United Kingdom, the University’s teaching and research are formally assessed by a Higher Education Funding Council, and its quality assurance policy and procedures are audited by the Higher Education Quality Council. These bodies have a commitment to the improvement of quality across the higher education sector, and the University continues to place high priority on the development and enhancement of its procedures for quality assurance.

    Open University degree programmes are at the UK higher education level, and the degree awarded is comparable with those awarded by other UK universities.

    The University has for many years operated credit transfer arrangements with other UK universities, and participates in national schemes for credit accumulation and transfer (CATS). Our credit transfer agreements enable Open University students to transfer to another institution and continue their studies for a degree of that institution. Holders of Open University course credits in appropriate subjects may be exempted from the first year of a degree course, and sometimes beyond. Similar arrangements apply to students transferring into The Open University from other universities.

    The University also has schemes of academic collaboration, whereby undergraduate students can transfer to another institution for a period of study, which can then be counted towards the Open University honours degree. Universities involved in the schemes include Cambridge and Oxford.

    Furthermore, a number of professional institutions have agreed recommended degree profiles with The Open University which, on completion, satisfy the academic element for membership of that institution. Examples include the British Psychological Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry and a number of Engineering Institutions, membership of which may lead to recognition by the Engineering Council as a Chartered Engineer.

    Open University graduates compete on equal terms for entry to postgraduate courses and research degrees, and receive equal recognition for such purposes as advancement within the teaching profession.
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    Sorry but the Gordon Brown part put me off lol , do you think he was an incompetent tutor?
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    (Original post by lincs_b)
    Sorry but the Gordon Brown part put me off lol , do you think he was an incompetent tutor?
    I was thinking the same thing! :yep:
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    (Original post by mike.park87)
    The OU was founded by Harold Wilson, one of our greatest peacetime prime ministers. I don't think our government would be subsidizing the OU if it wasn't a "serious" academic institution. Oh by the way, did you know Gordon Brown used to be an OU tutor before he entered the world of politics?

    Here is the standard introductory letter the OU can put together for you should you come across any organizations (usually foreign companies) that may not have heard of the OU.

    Cheerio


    To whom it may concern,

    The Open University was incorporated by Royal Charter in 1969. Like other UK universities, the Open University is independent and autonomous and is financed in the main from Government funds.

    The University’s academic standards are monitored by external examiners appointed from other universities and degree awarding institutions within the United Kingdom. In line with other universities in the United Kingdom, the University’s teaching and research are formally assessed by a Higher Education Funding Council, and its quality assurance policy and procedures are audited by the Higher Education Quality Council. These bodies have a commitment to the improvement of quality across the higher education sector, and the University continues to place high priority on the development and enhancement of its procedures for quality assurance.

    Open University degree programmes are at the UK higher education level, and the degree awarded is comparable with those awarded by other UK universities.

    The University has for many years operated credit transfer arrangements with other UK universities, and participates in national schemes for credit accumulation and transfer (CATS). Our credit transfer agreements enable Open University students to transfer to another institution and continue their studies for a degree of that institution. Holders of Open University course credits in appropriate subjects may be exempted from the first year of a degree course, and sometimes beyond. Similar arrangements apply to students transferring into The Open University from other universities.

    The University also has schemes of academic collaboration, whereby undergraduate students can transfer to another institution for a period of study, which can then be counted towards the Open University honours degree. Universities involved in the schemes include Cambridge and Oxford.

    Furthermore, a number of professional institutions have agreed recommended degree profiles with The Open University which, on completion, satisfy the academic element for membership of that institution. Examples include the British Psychological Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry and a number of Engineering Institutions, membership of which may lead to recognition by the Engineering Council as a Chartered Engineer.

    Open University graduates compete on equal terms for entry to postgraduate courses and research degrees, and receive equal recognition for such purposes as advancement within the teaching profession.
    Where did you get that?

    Thanks for posting it though - very helpful.
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    Where did you get that?


    Head over to the OU professional recognition area of their website

    http://www3.open.ac.uk/courses/essential/rils.shtm

    They've got a booklet you can order (or download as a PDF) called:

    'Entry to higher education and employment overseas'

    It's got everything you need to know about getting your OU qualifications recognized abroad. The introductory letter I posted earlier can be found on that same PDF file on page 10.

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    (Original post by mike.park87)


    Head over to the OU professional recognition area of their website

    http://www3.open.ac.uk/courses/essential/rils.shtm

    They've got a booklet you can order (or download as a PDF) called:

    'Entry to higher education and employment overseas'

    It's got everything you need to know about getting your OU qualifications recognized abroad. The introductory letter I posted earlier can be found on that same PDF file on page 10.

    Thanks!

    Are you studying with the OU at the moment?
 
 
 
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