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    Are you studying with the OU at the moment?
    Nopes. I'm just an OU fanboy :p:
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    (Original post by mike.park87)
    Nopes. I'm just an OU fanboy :p:
    Seriously?
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    Yes I'm serious. I love watching the OU/BBC programmes on TV
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    (Original post by mike.park87)
    Yes I'm serious. I love watching the OU/BBC programmes on TV
    Who doesn't? :p:
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    (Original post by mike.park87)
    Yes I'm serious. I love watching the OU/BBC programmes on TV
    So do all of us!
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    I guess it's the name that puts off some people. It has a very general feel to it. "Open University". (Don't get me wrong, I'm studying with them, and I'm merely expressing my opinion here about how people may perceive this university.) If it was called, dunno, "Royal Open University" then it would ring differently. (Royal was just a random stuff here, it could've been almost anything else.)

    Is it well respected? Since you had to ask it, obviously not that incredibly much. Is it some fake institute? No. It has degree awarding power and it's accredited. Also, many of their programmes are accredited by notable groups within the UK (like the British Computer Society). Check the recognition leaflets!

    A lot of people hold qualifications received from the OU, so it's a houshold name.

    Will the status of respect change considerably in the near future? Not likely, though it would only take one Nobel prize winner (or some other grand achievement, you may never know.) Could someone who gained a qualification from them turn out to be some genius and perform something OMFG? Why not? Could happen. It would help the OU tremendously to gain respect (I mean listing serial killers in the "notable alumni" section is a bit... strange). Will it be highly regarded in the far future? It's possible. Is online learning the future? Very likely. So, after a time, the OU should blend in with other institutes. (We are talking about perhaps 20-30 years.)

    Should you have second thoughts about the recognition of OU qualifications, you could always get a PgCert (or something higher) from some other university. Or you could perhaps transfer your OU degree and convert it. I mean if you are really that worried. I'm not sure it'd be necessary. Or, dunno, get a foundation degree or HND and then move to a different univ. Nobody cares where you got your HND from. Again, only if you really feel bitter or something.

    I like the way they teach. So far the course books are very good in quality (I'm almost finished with three courses now) and the assessments are not necessarily that incredibly simple. It's certainly not some diploma mill.

    Does that girl look cool on that OU advertisement? Yeah. okay, it's just some random thought.

    Also, please forgive me for my errors, I'm still trying to find a decent grasp on the boobs... ouch... I mean English of course.
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    It's called the Open Uni because of the whole openness thing y'know? Access for all and all that jazz.
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    I had this from an OU careers advisor; generally named degrees are preferred, however a degree is a degree at the end of the day. Having a degree will always be an advantage over those who don't in the job market...

    PS: many thanks mike.park87, very informative.
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    It annoys me that people react to the OU like this - especially when people say things like "OU degrees are not worth the paper they are written on". OU students work hard for their degrees, which are REAL and accredited, and are worthy of as much respect as any other degree.

    Once I complete my OU degree, I plan to go on to do a masters with either Surrey, Reading or Southampton. Surrey says "Entry is open to applicants with a UK First or Upper Second class honours degree or equivalent." so I don't see why they wouldn't accept an OU degree.
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    The pass marks are a little scary with OU.

    70% for a first in other uni's when it's 85% with OU.

    Oh well, just have to work my butt off.
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    They are marked differently so it works out about the same, or something along those lines.
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    I really appreciate this thread as I have just started a Law with Business LLB at a (not very respected) brick uni and am really having doubts. The OU sounds like a better option to me, especially as i am much much better at coursework type assignments than close book exams and it is a lot cheaper. what do people think about the idea of switching?

    my main concern is the same, wether the OU is as respected as a 'normal' degree.
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    (Original post by SunburnedCactus)
    They are marked differently so it works out about the same, or something along those lines.
    Are you sure?
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    (Original post by chichester)
    I really appreciate this thread as I have just started a Law with Business LLB at a (not very respected) brick uni and am really having doubts. The OU sounds like a better option to me, especially as i am much much better at coursework type assignments than close book exams and it is a lot cheaper. what do people think about the idea of switching?

    my main concern is the same, wether the OU is as respected as a 'normal' degree.
    Have a read of this:

    http://www.open.ac.uk/oubs/people-an...ege-of-law.php

    The fact that they are affiliated with the College of Law surely can't be a bad thing.

    In relation to your last point, there are quite a few posts on here asking that very question. The general consensus is that OU degrees are well respected (although in the minds of some probably not as respected as degrees from some other universities). I work in law, and there's a lot of snobbery within law and there is so much competition for training contracts etc that people with degrees from "better" universities are chosen.
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    (Original post by LFC FAN)
    Are you sure?
    I'm pretty certain, at least by comparing the marks I've been able to get on the OU courses with those I got at the U of York.
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    (Original post by aimeelala)
    Have a read of this:

    http://www.open.ac.uk/oubs/people-an...ege-of-law.php

    The fact that they are affiliated with the College of Law surely can't be a bad thing.

    In relation to your last point, there are quite a few posts on here asking that very question. The general consensus is that OU degrees are well respected (although in the minds of some probably not as respected as degrees from some other universities). I work in law, and there's a lot of snobbery within law and there is so much competition for training contracts etc that people with degrees from "better" universities are chosen.
    Thanks for this post, v helpful to have someone with a bit of insider knowledge!
    though I reckon that maybe an OU degree would be on a level with an LLB from Brighton? x
 
 
 
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