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    Are the Durham Colleges basically the same idea as the Oxbridge ones?
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    Not really, but they are similar in some ways. At Durham you will live and eat in the college, which is how they are similar, but they are different in that the teaching is centralised at Durham, and not done in the college.
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    You don't get taught in college at Durham.
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    Basically nothing to do with your subject/degree has any reflection on what college you're in or vice versa.
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    (Original post by Uel369)
    Are the Durham Colleges basically the same idea as the Oxbridge ones?
    Nope. Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only "collegiate" universities under the Education Act of 1988. Or something like that, my brain has gone to sleep. But this is misleading as teaching/supervisions don't take place in Durham colleges and academia is entirely independent. There are some exceptions, when certain colleges can appoint research staff (and there's Ushaw college, a training college for Catholic priests) but it's not worth really worring about that.

    Colleges really only play a social and pastoral role. They are still more than glorified halls of residence. Every college has its own sport teams, societies, pub, library etc. and, with Senior tutors and student support officers, there's a more personal touch to student support than you get at some other universities. In my experience anyway.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Nope. Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only "collegiate" universities under the Education Act of 1988. Or something like that, my brain has gone to sleep. But this is misleading as teaching/supervisions don't take place in Durham colleges and academia is entirely independent. There are some exceptions, when certain colleges can appoint research staff (and there's Ushaw college, a training college for Catholic priests) but it's not worth really worring about that.

    Colleges really only play a social and pastoral role. They are still more than glorified halls of residence. Every college has its own sport teams, societies, pub, library etc. and, with Senior tutors and student support officers, there's a more personal touch to student support than you get at some other universities. In my experience anyway.
    Sorry this is slightly off topic - which college are you at again?
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    (Original post by River85)
    Nope. Oxford, Cambridge and Durham are the only "collegiate" universities under the Education Act of 1988. Or something like that, my brain has gone to sleep. But this is misleading as teaching/supervisions don't take place in Durham colleges and academia is entirely independent. There are some exceptions, when certain colleges can appoint research staff (and there's Ushaw college, a training college for Catholic priests) but it's not worth really worring about that.

    Colleges really only play a social and pastoral role. They are still more than glorified halls of residence. Every college has its own sport teams, societies, pub, library etc. and, with Senior tutors and student support officers, there's a more personal touch to student support than you get at some other universities. In my experience anyway.
    I think I read that Lancaster has colleges too, probably not the same kind I guess.
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    (Original post by isawsparks89)
    Sorry this is slightly off topic - which college are you at again?
    I'm not at one technically :p: I'm at Cuth's

    (Original post by MyNameIsDave)
    I think I read that Lancaster has colleges too, probably not the same kind I guess.
    There are a few universities who have some form of collegiate structure that aren't identified as educational bodies by law. Lancaster, York and a few others have colleges. But again they are even less of an Oxbridge collegiate structure than Durham.

    Then there's the federal structure of London and I think the University of Wales is similar, individual teaching colleges under a federal banner of sorts.
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    (Original post by Xenopus)
    Not really, but they are similar in some ways. At Durham you will live and eat in the college, which is how they are similar, but they are different in that the teaching is centralised at Durham, and not done in the college.
    (Original post by isawsparks89)
    Basically nothing to do with your subject/degree has any reflection on what college you're in or vice versa.
    Ok. So basically then I live there and can apply to any college regardless of the course I will chose!?! Unlike Oxbridge where college application is restricted depending on whether or not the college offers that subject!?!

    Thanks I think I get it... and as regards choosing a college I should do it on the same principles as the choosing an Oxbridge one i.e. facilities, style of accommodation, size, age, how central it is etc...

    thanks again!!
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    If you can think of any other useful principles, then feel free to use them instead

    From the applicant POV, think of it as having an unusually large amount of choice about what accommodation block to choose. That's basically what you're applying for, though colleges have a lot more around that than most places.
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    Alhough some teaching takes place in the colleges, not all can be as there are science subjects that involve laboratories and Cambridge has a separate History Department for instance.
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    Er...almost no teaching (possibly actually none, depending on whether you count Ushaw etc.) takes places in Durham colleges...
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    (Original post by dring)
    Er...almost no teaching (possibly actually none, depending on whether you count Ushaw etc.) takes places in Durham colleges...
    I think Picnic is talking about teaching at Oxbridge colleges. I was confused for a moment there too though. :o:
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    In the case of Lancaster uni, the colleges there resemble little more than halls of residence, they also have some college specific sports clubs but it's pretty much just like choosing a hall to live in with more of a sense of belonging. Some colleges attract certain groups of people, for example Pendlebury (I think that's what it's called) is known as more of a sporty college.

    I did a summer course at Lancaster a few years ago and spoke to a few students there who mostly said they picked their colleges because of the type of accom they offered, ie some half en suite rooms, some don't but the accom there tends to be cheaper or because they liked to look of the bar on the open day.

    Lancaster is a campus uni so all colleges are grouped together quite closely, (although Graduate College - surprising only for postgrads - is slightly set to one side) so location doesn't matter either. Unless you prefer a 5 min walk to lectures instead of a 7min walk.
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    Lancaster (and York) have colleges but the difference is, you actually apply to a college as part of your Durham (and obviously Oxbridge) application whereas the other universities just pool you into a college once they've accepted you.
 
 
 
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