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Tipping and Service Charges in Cafes/Restaurants Watch

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    (Original post by BramsSTFU)
    That didn't really make sense? I still pay less for food than I do in England? I am in England
    I thought you'd be able to figure it out. :/ Food in America with tips still costs less than food in England without tips. The "you" was a universal "you".

    (Original post by MissHero)
    But that's wrong. Why should the customer pay extra money in addition to the bill in order to pay the staff, it ought to be paid by the employer, rather than relying on placing an obligation on the customer to give the employee a living wage.

    I realise that one should generally follow the culture of the country, but as something I completely disagree with, I don't see why I ought to comply any more than any other oppressive cultural practices.
    Because it's not "oppressive", as you put it. If you don't want to eat out at restaurants in America, you don't have to. If you want to, then accept what the cost is and be prepared to pay it.

    By not complying, you are not changing the system, you are simply making life a tiny bit harder for one person. Is that what you agree with?

    To the OP: I would have refused to pay the service charge, it's not compulsary. Also, it's worth finding out the tipping practices of particular companies, as most tips made on card as part of a payment will be subject to tax and the company will take a cut. Furthermore, with cash tips check whether it will all go to the person who is serving you, or into a pot where they might not necessarily see all of it again.
    I work at a restaurant in America and all credit card tips go to the server. All tips are, of course, subject to tax, in accordance with the law...
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    (Original post by la fille danse)


    I work at a restaurant in America and all credit card tips go to the server.
    All tips are, of course, subject to tax, in accordance with the law...
    In the UK this isn't the case at the moment (although the law is changing). 'Service charges' and credit card tips are often taken by the bosses - for this reason I always have service charges removed and then tip separately.

    In the USA I always tip...but when the service has been lousy (and on one occasion is was diabolical) I leave a tip that sends a message - a nickel usually does the job!

    (Conversely, when the waitress in one establishment went far beyond what I could have reasonably expected, she was rewarded accordingly)
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    I tip when its 'the done thing', if not I won't.
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    I tip 10% if i'm out for a meal with my gf, and nothing has happened to piss me off regarding service.

    (Original post by ShortRef)
    Heres a little something:

    Some cafes/restaurants put this service charge on. Instead of this 'tip' going to the waiters/waitresses, it goes into their wage so that they STILL get paid minimum wage, so the cafe/restaurant will get all of the tip.

    You can legally ask them to remove the service charge, then tip the waiter/waitress so then they will get the tip and not the restaurant. But if the waiter/waitress tells the customer they the restaurant is taking all of the service charge, they will be sacked.

    There is a new law coming in next year to prevent this.
    Law in what country?
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    Service charge? Oh do piss off.

    I tip if the service was okay/good. I do not tip if the service was bad.

    I'd rather the tip went to the waiter/waitress than the establishment
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    Some waitresses in American are on less that $3.00 an hour.. When I was job hunting out there, I saw one waitressing job advertised at $2.33 an hour, which is why it is expected of you to tip. It's just the culture over there.

    I'm glad to say, I now work somewhere post that pays really well, and the customers are really rich. on friday, I had 12 guests having a buffet, so I just served drinks and cleared plates and got £40 tips!
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    They are very rarely on the bills in this country but normally when I go for meals or places where tips are often left then it we leave 10% of the bill extra. Last time I was in the US we didn't mind tips being added to the bill as long as it wasn't a stupidly high percentage (we had one for 20+%)
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    (Original post by Smtn)
    I tip 10% if i'm out for a meal with my gf, and nothing has happened to piss me off regarding service.



    Law in what country?
    The UK...there was an outcry a while back about establishments taking hte service charges and tips to make up wages to minimum level.
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    The service charge is sometimes included, sometimes not.

    If it's not included, you are often almost expected to tip.

    If it IS included, they can sod off =] Unless you were pleased with their service and are feeling generous...
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    The deal in most European countries is that you just round up to a whole figure or leave a few odd coins if service has been good. I disagree with the 'mandatory' tip that seems to be prevalent in America and service charges that aren't on the menu are a joke.
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    Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!
    Mr. Pink: Uh-uh, I don't tip.
    Nice Guy Eddie: You don't tip?
    Mr. Pink: Nah, I don't believe in it.
    Nice Guy Eddie: You don't believe in tipping?
    Mr. Blue: You know what these chicks make? They make ****.
    Mr. Pink: Don't give me that. She don't make enough money then she can quit.
    Nice Guy Eddie: I don't even know a ******* Jew who'd have the balls to say that. Let me get this straight: you don't ever tip?
    Mr. Pink: I don't tip because society says I have to. All right, if someone deserves a tip, if they really put forth an effort, I'll give them something a little something extra. But this tipping automatically, it's for the birds. As far as I'm concerned, they're just doing their job.
    Mr. Blue: Hey, our girl was nice.
    Mr. Pink: She was okay. She wasn't anything special.
    Mr. Blue: What's special? Take you in the back and suck your ****?
    Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that.
    Mr. Pink: I'm very sorry the government taxes their tips, that's ****** up. That ain't my fault. It would seem to me that waitresses are one of the many groups the government ***** in the ass on a regular basis. Look, if you ask me to sign something that says the government shouldn't do that, I'll sign it, put it to a vote, I'll vote for it, but what I won't do is play ball. And as for this non-college ******** I got two words for that: learn to ******' type, 'cause if you're expecting me to help out with the rent you're in for a big ******' surprise.

    Edit: In a nutshell, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBFUDbOldMs
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    I had a £20 meal at a sushi bar yesterday. The staff were amazing there. I tipped £5.
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    If they've given better service than their wage would justify, I generally tip them. For example, nice, happy waitresses who actually engage you in conversation and help you out with things like course selection, extra sauce, etc. I always tip them. However, I am very much against tipping just for the sake of it. This is something which has been imported from America, where very often waiting staff are paid nothing and expected to make a salary out of tips. Additionally, the lack of a minimum wage in the US means that workers such as waiters etc. can get piss poor pay.
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    (Original post by steeler4life)
    I tip if its good service. I went to New York recently, and most of the places we went gave tipping suggestions on the bill! 12% for good service, 15% for great, and 20% for excellent service! There were 5 of us eating, so about $100-$140. Why should we be expected to pay an extra $20-$30 just for waiters/waitresses doing their jobs?
    I know most only get minimum wage and need the tips, but a few pounds/dollars from each customer is enough.
    a) There is no minimum wage in America.

    b) Many waiters in America are expected to derive their entire pay for tips alone.
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    I think the scene from Reservoir Dogs is well worth watching on its own, and particularly with relevance to this.

    Anyone fancy linking to it...?
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    (Original post by blackfish)
    I walked into a Cafe the other day and ordered a cup of tea. Fairly standard, teabag in a teapot jobby, nothing special. Advertised as £1.60 on the menu. Excellent.

    I went to pay and was told I would have to pay a service charge of 12.5% on top of my bill...! :mad: which soon made my tea an expensive £1.81

    BlackFish was not to happy about that! Then, the waitress expected me to leave a tip :eek: I thought, hang on a minute, why should I leave a tip just for a small pot of tea, a meal, then yes I can understand. But not for a small tea.

    Consquently I left the establishment and made a mental note not to got there again.

    So my question is, do you pay service charges/leave tips...? or do you ask for them to be removed from the bill??

    *edit* left decimal place out of price
    we don't tip bus drivers or anything like that so why has it became expected to tip the waiter hmmmmm.
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    I only ever tip if the waiter is hot. :yy:
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    I saved the life of a child and I didn't get a tip, why should I tip her for making me a coffee. Its your job.
 
 
 
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