Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    So I've been thinking about what I would want to do for my third year research, and I wondered what other TSR Psychers have/want to do.

    Any particular area? Perhaps you already have your title and/or methodology ideas? Know what other people have done in the past?

    Go.

    My ideas so far have ranged from a few clinical theories I'd like to test, to management of crowd behaviour to something regarding the interrogation techniques used by US/UK millitaries. (Not that those ideas would be approved. Hmpf). To be honest, if I was allowed to play with the fMRI scanner or TMS equipment I'd be happy.

    But generally, I think I'd like to stick to something clinical/medical/biological.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I was thinking about this earlier. I'm terrible at thinking of ideas/starting points, so I was trying to find somewhere to give me some ideas, haven't found anything yet though.

    I'm doing Psych with Clinical, so obviously something along those lines. Body image/exercise etc interests me most, so hopefully something along those lines if I can, although I think I'd get a bit depressed doing it.

    I'm not actually looking forward to it that much tbh, Psychology doesn't interest me as much as it used to. I want to do something Sport related, so if I can get that in somewhere I'm happy, heh.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you planning on doing something clinical or medical think again if you are planning on using clinical subjects as opposed to the student population. NHS research procedure is pain stakingly long, you'd be lucky to get authorisation by RnD and the Ethics commitee within 6months with no hiccups.

    Im planning a project oriented around neuronal and cognitive models of a certain type of action (yes vague as i dont like people copying my ideas ;p) possibly using EEG analysis (will be given training by my supervisor). Mine is neuro oriented but thats mainly if my grad med school application falls through again and again i might just change my career path to pure neuroscience research.

    Personally and reportedly by staff body image is overdone to death, especially with the psych student pop being 70% female. I prefer something original and with substance to be unique. Although i have been told the best projects are the ones based on established paradigms with some alterations.

    Each to their own!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jimbu)
    If you planning on doing something clinical or medical think again if you are planning on using clinical subjects as opposed to the student population. NHS research procedure is pain stakingly long, you'd be lucky to get authorisation by RnD and the Ethics commitee within 6months with no hiccups.

    Im planning a project oriented around neuronal and cognitive models of a certain type of action (yes vague as i dont like people copying my ideas ;p) possibly using EEG analysis (will be given training by my supervisor). Mine is neuro oriented but thats mainly if my grad med school application falls through again and again i might just change my career path to pure neuroscience research.

    Personally and reportedly by staff body image is overdone to death, especially with the psych student pop being 70% female. I prefer something original and with substance to be unique. Although i have been told the best projects are the ones based on established paradigms with some alterations.

    Each to their own!
    Yeah I kinda thought clinical research as an undergrad would be pretty much impossible.

    Weirdly enough, I'm hoping to do something neuro related and then apply to graduate medicine with neuro research as a backup.

    Let me know how your application goes
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Wait, wait, wait. After you do psychology, you can go into medically school or no because I want to go into either neurology or psychiatry. So is it possible?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by angelicgemini)
    Wait, wait, wait. After you do psychology, you can go into medically school or no because I want to go into either neurology or psychiatry. So is it possible?
    Yes, it is possible. See: Graduate Entry.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Where is the graduate entry thing?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by angelicgemini)
    Where is the graduate entry thing?
    Google.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jimbu)
    Personally and reportedly by staff body image is overdone to death, especially with the psych student pop being 70% female. I prefer something original and with substance to be unique. Although i have been told the best projects are the ones based on established paradigms with some alterations.
    That was also my concern, it seems a bit cliched. It's what I'm interested in personally (heh), but it is obviously quite a common subject. Hopefully something sport/exercise related will work out though.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Liv1204)
    ...
    - try googling the term "Activity Anorexia," you might just be very interested. Several papers have been published recently on anorexia in female athletes in relation to this theory. If you're still confused after a google search, drop me a message and I'll send you some direct article links.

    I don't know if it works the same at all unis, but we had a presentation where supervisors 'pitched' us their possible projects and we chose them. A few people designed their own but this takes considerably longer to do and may not necessarily be worth all the extra hassle.

    In terms of ethics, patients with current conditions are a no-no - but recovered patients? Yes, as long as your protocol and ethics application are watertight and amazing.
    Also if you're looking for something biological/medical, you ARE allowed to work with mice so perhaps approach supervisors who do animal research.

    Godspeed, I think you would be disappointed in the end if you did get to use the imaging/TMS equipment, because those instruments (especially fMRI) really do not clarify hypotheses. It sounds cool, but the entire field is a joke really when you consider that all fMRI tells you is that several areas of the brain consume more oxygen when you perform a task! Also, you talk about having back-ups for medicine, but if you get yourself some clinical experience while you're still at uni and apply to sensible places where you have a chance of getting in, you really shouldn't need one. Just to play devil's advocate for a second, the fact that you have a back-up at all suggests that you would go and do something else if you didn't get in first time round. Ask yourself a) are you doing everything that you can be (wk exp-wise) to get yourself in first time and b) if you're considering a back-up plan that is not related to furthering your chances of getting onto a GEP second-time round (whether a Masters increases your chances will vary across unis and also be debatable), is medicine 100% what you really want to do?

    Massively forgive me for playing devils advocate, but you're an articulate, intelligent bloke who's been disappointed by psychology and a) you must make sure for your own personal happiness that medicine won't disappoint you too and b) perhaps all this thinking and answering annoying questions will help you with future interviews Also mentioning GEPs to pre-undergrad psychologists is probably not a good idea, we should stop doing it. I swear I spent half the psych open day explaining to 18-year-olds about the GEP course when I was supposed to be talking about psychology! I think they saw it as an 'easier' route into medicine should they change their mind about clin psych/neuropsych/forensic psych. Most had one thing in common: an amazing lack of knowledge about psychology and related careers, stemming from a lack of due diligence in researching these areas.

    ANYWAY, all completely irrelevant to my third year project. I used a computer program to attempt to induce a positive interpretation bias in subjects that scored higher than student norms on the Cognitions Checklist (Beck etc; asking about depressed/anxious-style thoughts). In a positive interpretation bias, the person reads an ambiguous passage and could either make a negative or positive interpretation of the situation described. People with anxiety and depression are more likely to naturally make negative interpretations, the programme tries to change this. It was a clinically relevant project, yet was conducted using a computer program in a booth in the psychology dept - you don't need to be based on a psych ward to do something that pertains to clinical psychology.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    Godspeed, I think you would be disappointed in the end if you did get to use the imaging/TMS equipment, because those instruments (especially fMRI) really do not clarify hypotheses. It sounds cool, but the entire field is a joke really when you consider that all fMRI tells you is that several areas of the brain consume more oxygen when you perform a task! Also, you talk about having back-ups for medicine, but if you get yourself some clinical experience while you're still at uni and apply to sensible places where you have a chance of getting in, you really shouldn't need one. Just to play devil's advocate for a second, the fact that you have a back-up at all suggests that you would go and do something else if you didn't get in first time round. Ask yourself a) are you doing everything that you can be (wk exp-wise) to get yourself in first time and b) if you're considering a back-up plan that is not related to furthering your chances of getting onto a GEP second-time round (whether a Masters increases your chances will vary across unis and also be debatable), is medicine 100% what you really want to do?

    Massively forgive me for playing devils advocate, but you're an articulate, intelligent bloke who's been disappointed by psychology and a) you must make sure for your own personal happiness that medicine won't disappoint you too and b) perhaps all this thinking and answering annoying questions will help you with future interviews Also mentioning GEPs to pre-undergrad psychologists is probably not a good idea, we should stop doing it. I swear I spent half the psych open day explaining to 18-year-olds about the GEP course when I was supposed to be talking about psychology! I think they saw it as an 'easier' route into medicine should they change their mind about clin psych/neuropsych/forensic psych. Most had one thing in common: an amazing lack of knowledge about psychology and related careers, stemming from a lack of due diligence in researching these areas.
    You're right about the fMRI/TMS comment in the lack of answering hypothesies and this is something I have been reading about quite recently and it does make me second question my research ideas. Interesting none-the-less, and definitely something I want to learn about more before I start.

    Atm, I'm currently working my ass off to get enough work experience to make a competitive application to medicine. Doing quite well so far but still naturally feel a bit intimidated by the sheer number of applicants. My backup plan is something that might become a possibility if after I've been rejected for 6 years in a row or something But hopefully it wouldn't come to that.

    But yeah, I'm fully certain that medicine is what I want to do, and studying Psych has definitely solidified that choice for me. It was something that niggled in the back of my head when I first applied for Psychology and its something I wish I had paid attention to more before I sent my UCAS off. One year later and I can't ignore it anymore and I quickly realised I had made a wrong decision. Luckily GEM means that it's not a lost cause.

    I think you're right about mentioning GEM to the non-undergrads. What you said was a little worrying. It's a pretty stupid idea to go through an undergrad with the intentions of graduate entry. I'm actually quite shocked it had so much interest at your open days. If they honestly believe it is the easier route into medicine, then they will be in for a big surprise.

    But yeah, I'm certain medicine is where I want to be. I've learnt alot about both career options in the last year and medicine has just sucked me in 200% while Psych has only pushed me away. I'm just very happy that graduate entry means that the route isn't closed to me. I'm currently in the process of gaining lots of good work experience and filling a journal with general ideas/reasons/thoughts etc about medicine and I'm constantly running interview scenarios in my head and how I would answer questions and explain why I would be so much happier in medicine. I think my poor girlfriend gets tired of me talking about it! :o:
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    - try googling the term "Activity Anorexia," you might just be very interested. Several papers have been published recently on anorexia in female athletes in relation to this theory. If you're still confused after a google search, drop me a message and I'll send you some direct article links.
    Thank-you, that sounds very interesting! I shall have a google later, see what I can find, and I'll PM you otherwise! Much appreciated.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I think you're right about mentioning GEM to the non-undergrads. What you said was a little worrying. It's a pretty stupid idea to go through an undergrad with the intentions of graduate entry. I'm actually quite shocked it had so much interest at your open days. If they honestly believe it is the easier route into medicine, then they will be in for a big surprise.
    Not necessarily that they think it will be easier in that way, but I think a lot of people who consider psychology are also attracted to medicine (easy to understand why). To do medicine at Oxford you pretty much need 4/5/6 As at A-Level whereas to do Psychology you only need three, and so perhaps they consider psychology a good way to go to a really good uni, whereas it's more difficult when applying for medicine. I guess they then conclude that the applicant pool will be smaller and perhaps they will be more successful if they have an Oxford degree. Not that this is the only reason they choose to study psychology (they all want to study 'people' and are sort-of right in thinking that psychology does that more than medicine), but I think this is quite an unconscious thought process that people do go through.

    Anyway, apologies for hijacking yet another thread with more GEP stuff, all the psychologists must be yaaaawning!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Liv1204)
    Thank-you, that sounds very interesting! I shall have a google later, see what I can find, and I'll PM you otherwise! Much appreciated.
    Mmm yes I can see a project forming in my head right now...studying female university athletes and their eating/exercise behaviours. Although make sure you find all the up-to-date articles on this before beginning to plan a project, it's a nice specialised area so I think it will be possible to read everything then either replicate one of the studies or extend one or even come up with something new to add to the field!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    Mmm yes I can see a project forming in my head right now...studying female university athletes
    Sounds good.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    Well I'm afraid mine was on recognition memory decay, so quite some way from anything clinical, but one thing I would certainly say is people who liked their supervisors generally did better. So picking a supervisor you can get on with is nearly as important as the research topic.

    What I did was look at the previous research of the staff who did stuff I liked and then came up with a variation/extension of a paradigm used by a lecturer I liked. The benefits of this are having a topic that both you and they are actually interesed in, a supervisor you don't mind spending time with, the supervisor's extra willingness to help or offer advice and, if it's good enough, even a chance they will try and get it published.

    On a practical level, working with "vulnerable populations" requires various levels of clearance for different groups and I knew people practically tearing their hair out just getting clearance to go into schools. I'd say take the path of least resistance, as things which seemed really cool when you first plan them can get seriously old after several months of hard graft and its made even worse if you know there was probably an easier (if slightly less glamorous) option available.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    I swear I spent half the psych open day explaining to 18-year-olds about the GEP course when I was supposed to be talking about psychology! I think they saw it as an 'easier' route into medicine should they change their mind about clin psych/neuropsych/forensic psych. Most had one thing in common: an amazing lack of knowledge about psychology and related careers, stemming from a lack of due diligence in researching these areas.
    I'm surprised people wanting to go to Oxford would need an easier route into medicine. I know tons of people who want to do medicine (at my school it seems to be just the done thing) many of whom wouldn't consider applying to Oxford/Cambridge whatever the subject. (I mean obviously medicine at Oxford will be harder to get into than psychology at Oxford but still).

    Personally, I've never wanted to be a doctor at all. Considered law though and if I did end up not wanting to spend the rest of my life in psychology/neuroscience, I'd probably go for that. If that was what I really wanted to do though, I'd be applying straight for that. (I was sorely tempted after doing a mock trial competition but I was never seriously going to change my mind.)

    Surprised about the lack of knowledge from other applicants too, but that can only be a good thing for me. (Well, as long as the ones that actually get in aren't like that.)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Meliae)
    Surprised about the lack of knowledge from other applicants too, but that can only be a good thing for me. (Well, as long as the ones that actually get in aren't like that.)
    Don't worry, you were a well-informed visitor! Apparantly one person turned up asking to do psychology and french (an obvious boo-boo). Most people didn't know absolutely nothing though. I think the Graduate Medicine option is attractive to potential Oxford Psychologists for obvious reasons - you get to be in a smaller pool of 'top' graduates, whereas the pool of people with 3As at A Level is much larger. Also many people really do want to study psychology, but don't know whether they actually want to be a psychologist at the end. Doctor is the classic 'helping people' profession, which is something a lot of psychologists want to do, but being a doctor is seen as being of a higher status and better paid than psychology (unfortunately the first one may be truer than the second these days). I definitely think psychology (particularly the mental health part) will be of practical use in becoming a doctor - I have to say, I do fail to see how most psychiatrists can ever understand their patients as they don't study the psychological aspects of disorders, seemingly!

    Anyway, after that ramble I thought I'd just like to boast and inform everybody that my research project came in at a whopping 72.5% And thank goodness, because that term of stress would not have been worth it otherwise!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    Don't worry, you were a well-informed visitor! Apparantly one person turned up asking to do psychology and french (an obvious boo-boo). Most people didn't know absolutely nothing though. I think the Graduate Medicine option is attractive to potential Oxford Psychologists for obvious reasons - you get to be in a smaller pool of 'top' graduates, whereas the pool of people with 3As at A Level is much larger. Also many people really do want to study psychology, but don't know whether they actually want to be a psychologist at the end. Doctor is the classic 'helping people' profession, which is something a lot of psychologists want to do, but being a doctor is seen as being of a higher status and better paid than psychology (unfortunately the first one may be truer than the second these days). I definitely think psychology (particularly the mental health part) will be of practical use in becoming a doctor - I have to say, I do fail to see how most psychiatrists can ever understand their patients as they don't study the psychological aspects of disorders, seemingly!

    Anyway, after that ramble I thought I'd just like to boast and inform everybody that my research project came in at a whopping 72.5% And thank goodness, because that term of stress would not have been worth it otherwise!
    Congratulations.

    Personally, the main reason I've never wanted to be a doctor is squeamishness. I used to refuse to watch dissections and operations and such. I'm not that bothered now although spending all day surrounded by stuff like that doesn't exactly appeal to me.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: July 26, 2009

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Staffordshire University
    Nursing and Midwifery Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.