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Anyone just finished AS Art? I need some help... Watch

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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    It's as much as you are willing to do.

    A-level isn't spoon fed so you'll have to come up with your own ideas and develop them yourself.
    You could make an excellent module with high quality wok, without many pieces and still get an A. Some of it may not even be completed, as long as it shows a clear train of thought and attention to detail and as long as you have a focused final outcome from the module.

    Also, you're expected to do more written work in the A-level - much more annotation and explanation of your pieces as well as a 3,000 word essay in the A2 year.

    You can't just draw an image from a magazine etc in A-level, there has to be a theme to each module and reason for every piece.

    So yeah, it's a managable workload, but in essence, you set the workload yourself by the topics that you chose and how complex your ideas are. As a rough guide though, you're expected to have at least 12 pieces + a final outcome per topic.
    As I said, it's quality not quantity, so if you only do 12 pieces you won't necessarily be at a disadvantage to other candidates - as long as the work is very good you can ace it.
    Sorry to pester you so much, but how many topics would you do?
    And what qualifies as a piece?

    For GCSE, I had around 10 A3 drawings (mostly pencil, though there was some other media) and an A2 final piece for 3 topics.
    The A2 piece was typically a painting, or mixed media piece.

    I've attatched an example A3 piece (I think)
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    Whoops...
    I've kinda stolen this thread...
    Er, sorry OP
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    (Original post by SabaBlackSheep)
    Sorry to pester you so much, but how many topics would you do?
    And what qualifies as a piece?

    For GCSE, I had around 10 A3 drawings (mostly pencil, though there was some other media) and an A2 final piece for 3 topics.
    The A2 piece was typically a painting, or mixed media piece.

    I've attatched an example A3 piece (I think)
    If you scroll to page 6 on this document (AQA specification) it explains it much more clearly than I can - it's really straightforward. http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/pdf/AQA...01-W-SP-08.PDF

    For your second question 'what qualifies as a piece?' - we could discuss that for eternity, it's pretty much what art critics argue over all the time lol.
    So I can't really say...

    You will need to branch out and use as many types of media as possible though - I don't mean 'as many types of media on one single piece', I mean within each Unit you need to demonstrate an ability to be proficient in all media.

    The image you attached is great for GCSE standard, but at A-level (although it is a good peice) it isn't suitable - that was one of the things that originally shocked me with the transition for GCSE to A-level. There is only one theme in that piece - 'celebrity' and there is no depth, there is nothing to discuss about it other than (I assume) you drew it from sight from an album/magazine etc. When I first started doing work at AS level my teacher kept asking 'why' - everything you do you need to question the meaning behind it, otherwise, if you can't explain it then it's not worth doing.

    For example, as one of my units I chose 'chiaroscuro' (you get a list from the exam board and you choose from it).
    Everything in that unit must relate to that title and the end piece must ultimately portray it/my interpretation of it. So what I did was researched the topic and wrote a short essay about it and what I planned to do. I then researched buildings which I believed captured chiaroscuro such as the Parthenon or ancient ruins.

    It all culminated in me ending up with about 3 sketch pads full of preliminary ideas and photographs/sketches. Then I took my own photographs of local buldings and began to make collages of the new and the old buildings. My final piece was etched out in silver and white on a black background - it consisted of 3 seperate boards moving though light to dark and ancient to modern, respectively.

    My 3,000 word study was focussed on the work of an artist whom I was lucky enough to interview and who let me photograph his work etc. Basically you have to research a lot and have meaning behind all that you do. There must be a link from one piece to the next.

    Anyway, I've said a lot lol! PM me if you have any more questions, I'll be happy to answer them
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    If you scroll to page 6 on this document (AQA specification) it explains it much more clearly than I can - it's really straightforward. http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/pdf/AQA...01-W-SP-08.PDF

    For your second question 'what qualifies as a piece?' - we could discuss that for eternity, it's pretty much what art critics argue over all the time lol.
    So I can't really say...

    You will need to branch out and use as many types of media as possible though - I don't mean 'as many types of media on one single piece', I mean within each Unit you need to demonstrate an ability to be proficient in all media.

    The image you attached is great for GCSE standard, but at A-level (although it is a good peice) it isn't suitable - that was one of the things that originally shocked me with the transition for GCSE to A-level. There is only one theme in that piece - 'celebrity' and there is no depth, there is nothing to discuss about it other than (I assume) you drew it from sight from an album/magazine etc. When I first started doing work at AS level my teacher kept asking 'why' - everything you do you need to question the meaning behind it, otherwise, if you can't explain it then it's not worth doing.

    For example, as one of my units I chose 'chiaroscuro' (you get a list from the exam board and you choose from it).
    Everything in that unit must relate to that title and the end piece must ultimately portray it/my interpretation of it. So what I did was researched the topic and wrote a short essay about it and what I planned to do. I then researched buildings which I believed captured chiaroscuro such as the Parthenon or ancient ruins.

    It all culminated in me ending up with about 3 sketch pads full of preliminary ideas and photographs/sketches. Then I took my own photographs of local buldings and began to make collages of the new and the old buildings. My final piece was etched out in silver and white on a black background - it consisted of 3 seperate boards moving though light to dark and ancient to modern, respectively.

    My 3,000 word study was focussed on the work of an artist whom I was lucky enough to interview and who let me photograph his work etc. Basically you have to research a lot and have meaning behind all that you do. There must be a link from one piece to the next.

    Anyway, I've said a lot lol! PM me if you have any more questions, I'll be happy to answer them
    Thanks for everything you've said. I think we've cleared up all of my questions about the course(:

    About the piece I attatched- how is the quality of it as compared to AS stuff? And that also leads me to ask how much of a jump there is in quality when you get to AS?

    On a totally separate note, chiaroscuro was my word of the day a few moths ago :p:

    And that's all, I promise
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    (Original post by SabaBlackSheep)
    Thanks for everything you've said. I think we've cleared up all of my questions about the course(:

    About the piece I attatched- how is the quality of it as compared to AS stuff? And that also leads me to ask how much of a jump there is in quality when you get to AS?

    On a totally separate note, chiaroscuro was my word of the day a few moths ago :p:

    And that's all, I promise
    Lol, you're welcome

    The quality is good :thumbsup:. I don't think you have to worry about that tbh although as with anything you can still push yourself further, but the course will make you do that without realising it anyway.

    I've seen quality less than that at A-level and I've seen some absolutely amazing stuff that I could never do myself.

    Also, at A-level even though you have to have a natural talent for art and need to be fairly good at it, you can get away with one or two shaky pieces if you can make up for it with discussion/written work.

    The jump in quality probably varies from college to college but when I went into AS year and saw the A2 work in our studio it shocked me at how good it was and I wanted to be that good, so I upped my game and worked harder. So, if you're surrounded by a talented bunch of people I think you're more inclined to make the quality of your own work better. I can only speak from experince and in my school there was a huge difference from GCSE to AS level (with the odd exception of a couple of people who only took the subject because they thought art was going to be an easy A-level) and even still there was a very noticable difference from AS and A2 work.

    Just aim to get better all the time, even when you think it's perfect (which not many of us do lol) just knitpick at your own work or get people to critique it. You'll be fine judging from you pencil sketch though - just remember to work in other media too ;].
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    I shall just keep drawin'
    And a painting, and a sculpting, and... I'm actually really looking forward to using some more media- my school is veh-hery limited, I hopes they step it up. They have to.

    So, really, AS level is like GCSE, but you have to think about things a lot more, justify your descisions, and be more self-motivated...

    Also, love your use of italics.
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    Hmm, thanks everyone. I don't mind the hijack...was quite informative :P

    I'm even more confused noww thoughhhhh. I think I'll just have more of a go at this project I've got to do to try and get into practise again. They'll probably let me change later if I find the work is too much, and there are a number of subjects I'd be happy to change to, so hopefully it'll be okay
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    theres alot of work you need to do in as art.
    something you have to put effort in.. for a long time.
    i suggest you to look into clubs the college offer? like life drawing?
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    (Original post by Vantastic)
    theres alot of work you need to do in as art.
    something you have to put effort in.. for a long time.
    i suggest you to look into clubs the college offer? like life drawing?
    Thats a good idea...

    I'm hoping to start DofE when I get there - I could do it for my skills section instead of the A-level
 
 
 
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