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    um physics SL has no complex maths whatsoever. The hardest thing you get to do is maybe find the slope and area under the graph and ln and logs (for radioactivity). Nothing to worry about, as you just have to "rearrange" equations. DON'T take physics, even SL, UNLESS you really really LOVE the subject...because believe me, physics SL is no joke...having said that, good luck! (:
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    I am going to comment about my experience with IB math and physics. I took IB Physics HL and Mathematical Methods SL and the physics really does have a profound effect on your math marks (used to the calculator, more logical thinking that helps with math). IB Physics doesn't necessarily require calculus or anything, but that being said, an exposure to calculus DOES help.
    I was averaging about a 5 in math during my first year, I pulled it up to a predicted 6 but I honestly believe that I probably got a 7 on my final exam!

    Enough bragging aside. Mathematical Methods SL is a maintainable course of study that is fairly simple if you have a great textbook and past IB questions. I was averaging about an 82 in advanced math 11 in Canada and IB Math SL was a snap. Algebra is very simplistic, as are graphing functions and solving quadratics. Vectors and Periodicity stuff just requires a bit of practice in order to master the concepts. Most importantly, the stats, probability and calculus they teach you in the course are quite straightforward; the questions are fairly predictable, there are lots of practice questions out there and if you put the time in and have proper study habits (like you should have in the IB) there is no reason why you can't get at least a 6.

    At the end of the day, your success with IB truly does have to do with the effort you put into them. If you recognize that Maths is your weakest course, don't be afraid to take Studies or Methods SL. I highly recommend Mathematical Methods SL! I think if you are very good at the sciences and put the time into your math (even Saturday mornings if you have to), there is no reason why Maths should even be remotely difficult.

    Good luck and I'm interested in hearing what you decide to do.
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    Simple, marry maths and cheat on her with science!

    And yes maths and science are definitely women :sexface:





    Pre uni level neither chemistry or Physics has difficult maths in it. A lot of it will be the utilisation of a calculator and following a step by step method of calculation (especially in chemistry) so I wouldn't worry.
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    (Original post by delightedly)
    You do realise that people in some countries call it "Math", right?
    Incorrectly, yes.

    (Original post by dfjr)
    Simple, marry maths and cheat on her with science!

    And yes maths and science are definitely women
    I'm in the process of doing that.
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    (Original post by v-zero)
    I'm in the process of doing that.
    Good for you. Living the dream I'd say :yep:
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    (Original post by delightedly)
    You do realise that people in some countries call it "Math", right?
    Yes.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1279282
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    (Original post by dfjr)
    And yes maths and science are definitely women :sexface:
    That's why there are (statistically) more men attracted to maths and science!
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    (Original post by delightedly)
    You do realise that people in some countries call it "Math", right?
    I call it Numeracy. :proud:
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    Don't be so silly.
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    (Original post by near_comatose)
    Don't be so silly.
    Sorry for being a pedant and having standards.
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    (Original post by /dev/null)
    Sorry for being a pedant and having standards.
    The standard that people should have to use British spelling on a website because the server is in the UK? Yes, you should be sorry for that utterly worthless standard.
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    (Original post by near_comatose)
    The standard that people should have to use British spelling on a website because the server is in the UK? Yes, you should be sorry for that utterly worthless standard.
    Math is just incorrect. Your undertaking the study of Mathematics, Maths is a contraction of Mathematics. Math is not. I've never heard anyone say "the study of Mathematic", ever.

    While i'm here, I also hate how Americans say "that's so addicting"... again completely incorrect.
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    Physics is beautiful. No matter how hard you find it, it's always worth pursuing the dream!
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    (Original post by /dev/null)
    Math is just incorrect. Your undertaking the study of Mathematics, Maths is a contraction of Mathematics. Math is not. I've never heard anyone say "the study of Mathematic", ever.

    While i'm here, I also hate how Americans say "that's so addicting"... again completely incorrect.
    You're welcome.
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    (Original post by near_comatose)
    You're welcome.
    You just proved my point?
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    (Original post by /dev/null)
    You just proved my point?
    It's quite obviously not incorrect.
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    i was wondering what would be better for doing LAW in the future - IB or A levels?? (hopefully at cambridge/UCL etc)

    i know most people who apply at cambridge (etc) have the usual scores of A* and As ..so it won't stand out. but i was just wondering what are the pros and cons of both courses?

    and personal feedback of the IB? and whether it was a good choice to take? by the way, which subjects would you recommend in IB (for law or which are most difficult < which i should avoid taking etc) and for A level (for law)?

    ..im just really confused :/ .. and is IB really as difficult as people say? ALSO how many UCAS points can you get from IB and A levels?
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    (Original post by xjjdy)
    i was wondering what would be better for doing LAW in the future - IB or A levels?? (hopefully at cambridge/UCL etc)

    i know most people who apply at cambridge (etc) have the usual scores of A* and As ..so it won't stand out. but i was just wondering what are the pros and cons of both courses?

    and personal feedback of the IB? and whether it was a good choice to take? by the way, which subjects would you recommend in IB (for law or which are most difficult < which i should avoid taking etc) and for A level (for law)?

    ..im just really confused :/ .. and is IB really as difficult as people say? ALSO how many UCAS points can you get from IB and A levels?
    Remember that IB is designed to challenge top students, so only take it if you're properly confident you can cope with the really high standard. Cambridge's standard offer for IB is like 38 points or something, minimum, and ideally you'd be wanting 39, 40 or so.

    I never had the option to take IB and it's something I always feel quite disappointed about. If you are academically bright, A-levels and equivalent will just bore the crap out of you. Yes, IB is meant to be a lot of work (look in the other threads in this section for an indication- and that's taking into account the TSR bias of most posters here being geniuses) but if you want a real challenge and a course that will prepare you well for uni, IB is very well looked upon.

    On the other hand, A-levels will give you lots of time to focus on extra-curriculars and other interests, and will allow you an easier time.
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    (Original post by xjjdy)
    i was wondering what would be better for doing LAW in the future - IB or A levels?? (hopefully at cambridge/UCL etc)

    i know most people who apply at cambridge (etc) have the usual scores of A* and As ..so it won't stand out. but i was just wondering what are the pros and cons of both courses?

    and personal feedback of the IB? and whether it was a good choice to take? by the way, which subjects would you recommend in IB (for law or which are most difficult < which i should avoid taking etc) and for A level (for law)?

    ..im just really confused :/ .. and is IB really as difficult as people say? ALSO how many UCAS points can you get from IB and A levels?
    Well, I guess it depends on what courses you're able to study.
    IB is a good choice to take but you have to be willing to put a lot of time down into studying. Most people seem to say that A levels is easier. UCAS points don't really matter, universities generally don't follow the UCAS points system.

    I have no clue what subjects are good for law but go for subjects you feel that you'd be best at. Avoid taking 'soft' subjects - trinity college cambridge has a list of subjects which they consider more suitable than others: http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604

    It's really up to you... A levels seem easier - as they take less subjects - but their subjects are more in depth, you also have more freedom when picking your subjects. for the IB you have to take English, a science, maths, a humanities etc... so if you happen to be bad at one subject but have to study it, it'll affect your entire grade.
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    (Original post by Xelb)
    x
    Don't*worry....I*took*physics *SL*and*its*a*really*easy  course*
    And*there's*a*really*low*gr ade*boundary**Like*68%*for*a*7
    And*there*isn't*any*advanced *math*at*all*
 
 
 
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