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Etiquette.. Miss, ma'am or Christian name? Watch

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    I'm meeting a solicitor & a judge tomorrow.
    Both of them are female.
    How should I address them?
    I know my solicitor is called Lucy, it's down on some correspondence I've received.


    Advice?
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    Call the judge "yer honour" and the solicitor "m'learned friend" :top:

    Where are you meeting them? In court? In their office? For a drink at the pub?
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    You'd think that 'Miss' could be a wee bit risky if they end up being married. A colleague and I had a conversation like this recently, and we decided that we liked 'ma'am' for the balance between formal and informal.
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    Never Miss.
    Your Honour is alright if you're in court. Or you should call them Ms... and their surname.
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    Find our their surnames and hedge your bets by making a noise which sounds somewhere between 'Miss' and 'Ms.' before said surname, unless you're fairly sure the woman in question is married.

    You don't call someone 'Miss' alone, unless she's a teacher and you're a Beano character. 'Ma'am' (like Sir, I suppose has a more specialised usage in the UK than in the US. It's inappropriate.
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    Good luck for tomorrow. Unless you were guilty, in which case, I retract said good luck.
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    "Oreyt love" would be how I'd address them, at the end of the day they're just people with law degrees, they aren't royalty
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    Isn't ma'am what you call peeps at whorehouses? I dunno, just something i heard that i felt might have a grain of truth in it :unsure:
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    This reminds me of that joke, what do you say to a chav in a suit? "Would the defendant please stand.."

    LAOWL.
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    Not Miss, it sounds like a teacher. And first name alone would be a bit too informal. Ma'am I hate, it sounds too much like you're addressing an old person/the queen. I'd recommend if you know their surnames addressing them initally as Ms ........ and then they'll correct you and tell you what to call them if that's not right. It's the option which will be the most likely not to offend them at all and is (I think) the most polite to begin with.
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    Isn't ma'am what you call peeps at whorehouses? I dunno, just something i heard that i felt might have a grain of truth in it :unsure:
    A Madam is what one might find in a brothel.

    You would refer to the Queen as "ma'am" as well, so I'm not sure what you're implying
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    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    A Madam is what one might find in a brothel.

    You would refer to the Queen as "ma'am" as well, so I'm not sure what you're implying
    Oh ok, must've confused ma'am and Madam.

    This was odd because in India Madam is an accepted form of etiquette (as are lots of british greetings; Maamsabh is literally a amalgamation of ma'am and sabh, sabh meaning sir).

    Teehee, it's expected for an Indian / American to think of the Queen as a ho (not that i do :shifty:)
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    Ms. Surname and if they say, 'call me Lucy/firstname' call them that.
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    (Original post by Irrelevance)
    Good luck for tomorrow. Unless you were guilty, in which case, I retract said good luck.
    No, I'm the Claimant.
    & thank you.
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    Oh ok, must've confused ma'am and Madam.

    This was odd because in India Madam is an accepted form of etiquette (as are lots of british greetings; Maamsabh is literally a amalgamation of ma'am and sabh, sabh meaning sir).

    Teehee, it's expected for an Indian / American to think of the Queen as a ho (not that i do :shifty:)
    Madam is accepted, too; it is the female equivalent of sir :p:
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    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    Madam is accepted, too; it is the female equivalent of sir :p:
    Enough with the english lessons.

    *chomps on vanilla flavoured icequeen's arm* :teeth:
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    Oh ok, must've confused ma'am and Madam.

    This was odd because in India Madam is an accepted form of etiquette (as are lots of british greetings; Maamsabh is literally a amalgamation of ma'am and sabh, sabh meaning sir).

    Teehee, it's expected for an Indian / American to think of the Queen as a ho (not that i do :shifty:)
    I feel the same about Madam... I grew up in Bahrain, and it's the normal form of address to a women when you don't know their name there! In the UK, I'm never sure what to use, especially serving in a shop.... I can call the men sir, but what do I call the women???
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    (Original post by Lefty Leo)
    Enough with the english lessons.

    *chomps on vanilla flavoured icequeen's arm* :teeth:
    Vanilla? Don't I at least get to be an exciting flavour?
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    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    Vanilla? Don't I at least get to be an exciting flavour?
    How does pistachio sound? :yep:
 
 
 
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