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    Well basically I am concerned on whether they will actually offer me a place or not, I would like some feedback on the chance of them offering me a place or not. thank you

    A-levels i should be predicted A*A*A with a bit a of nagging here and there and GCSE 9 A*'s and 2 A's with relevant work experience in law firms, probation service and banks. With a general good reference and personal statement.

    How likely or unlikey am i? Im desperate to get in
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    yes
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    I'm not even English and I know those are stupidly good grades. In other words, YES.
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    Sorry. Not good enough :sad:
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    You're either fishing for compliments or totally stupid/naive, and haven't done any research whatsoever into law courses at university.

    With those grades (providing your predicted A2 grades actually reflect what you attained at AS) should almost certainly get you a place at Newcastle for Law. It's not that competitive. With those grades you should be looking at the elite law schools (Durham, Nottingham, UCL, Bristol) and even Oxbridge if it appealed to you.
    Well I wouldn't say I was stupid or naive however what I didn't know was the actual amount of competition I would face for the places of which Newcaslte holds (150) therefore I would naturally assume that to be quite a competitive course compared to other such places. Also regards to oxbridge I would say I have no chance to be honest.
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    (Original post by Castelbajac)
    Sorry. Not good enough :sad:
    AWWWWWWWWW
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    Sorry, I was unfair to call you stupid. You'd be surprised how many people post on TSR purely to flatter their ego though.

    Yeah, on paper pretty much every single law school in the country will look massively oversubscribed and thus insanely competitive, but in practice it's a little different. The average candidate for each law school will vary, and I can confidently say you'll be towards the higher end of applicants to Newcastle. Out of curiosity, why Newcstle in particular? The amazing nightlife, a good university vibe or? It's just with your grades, you should really be aiming higher. It'll be very advantageous for you when you come to apply for pupilages etc. if you've come from one of the elite law schools, which are, roughly speaking: Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, King's, Nottingham, Durham and Bristol (I make the assumption that if you're doing Law, you want to enter it as well). Don't rule out Oxbridge either. It's definitely worth a go; only 1/5 of your spaces on UCAS.

    I think you pretty much hit the nail on the head when you stated about Newcastle's nightlife I just feel its time for me to actually start enjoying life in a sense. I just feel for too long I have been under stress from teachers and parents etc. and in Newcaslte I would probably end up with my gf and lots of friends and family around me, I would like to aim for a first but I just don't want to encounter anymore (extra) stress I believe that Oxbridge or most of the others you mention would probably ential than Newcastle would give. Your correct in your assumption , but I don't know whether being a barrister would be such an appealing job to me , I believe becoming a solicitor would to me personally be a much more enjoyable and in the end hopefully becoming a district judge or setting my own firm up with other solicitors. I would just think surely a first in law at newcaslte would be sufficent to get to where I want to be in life. Would you agree? Or would you say in the end three years at some where like King's or Durham would be a better option ? I just feel I wouldn't be as happy any where else as I would be at Newcaslte in the end.

    Don't worry about calling me stupid , I get it more than you would imagine.
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    Sorry, I was unfair to call you stupid. You'd be surprised how many people post on TSR purely to flatter their ego though.

    It's definitely worth a go; only 1/5 of your spaces on UCAS.
    Yeah I might just give it ago for an elite law school or three (newcaslte only takes up one and a back up such as Hull) , you never know I might just change my mind.
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    just thinking about it I wouldn't mind doing a masters in law would this be an advantage to gaining a pupilage if i decided to go down that path?
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    I totally understand your trepidation in applying to places that may work you harder, and leave you with less time for 'play' as it were. What you forget is that a law course is a law course, and though it will certainly vary in academic rigour/workload as you cross different universities, all in all you're doing a stressful, highly time-consuming degree wherever you go. My brother went to King's (an 'elite' law school, but not on par with somewhere like Oxford) and he couldn't really get involved with football teams/societies/the SU because the workload for a law degree is just so large. This is something you're just going to have to accept if you're doing Law I'm afraid.

    Conversely it may be somewhat disheartning to be studying and putting in so much work at Newcastle, whilst having the niggling doubt in your head that you could be somewhere better, and doing a comparable amount of work (and coming out with a better degree). Law degrees are not as 'equal' as say, medical degrees (where the medical school you graduate from has little bearing on the placement you get afterwards). Law is still a profession where university name matters, to a far larger extent anyway. Pupilages and tenancy are extremely competitve as it is, so if becoming a solicitor is your ultimate goal then you really will want to give yourself every advantage possible. There are people out there with law degrees from Oxford and Cambridge who are struggling, and the recession has also impacted on the amount of people firms are prepared to take on. In this climate no-one is guaranteed jobs - so if firms are swatting away LSE/Durham grads without a second's thought, it'll take a far greater effort on your part to stand out with a degree from Newcastle. Also note a first, whilst very good, is not particulary rare. A lot of people with firsts from the top law schools still find it difficult to get work.

    A masters could be useful, but bear in mind the cost and the time commitment. The masters would need to be from an excellent university to have a signficiant impact on your chances (an LLM from Cambridge/LSE/Harvard/Yale; BCL from Oxford). Are you really sure you'd want to take this large time/financial risk just to level out the playing field? Note: to get into these courses you would have to get a first.

    All in all you shouldn't disregard some of the elite universities for having 'weaker' social scenes. These law schools understand the immense amount of stress it's students are put under, and tend to be fantastic for giving support, and organising social events etc. King's, Nottingham, Durham and UCL in particular would certainly rival Newcastle in this sense. My advice would be go for Newcastle, one of the Oxbridge's (you'll want to start preperation for this application sooner rather than later - picking between the two, then picking a college..), and two/three elite schools depending on how ambitious your feeling. Since Newcastle is AAA, it would definitely be worth having an AAB law school thrown in as an insurance. Best of luck. You seem like an excellent candidate, so don't underestimate your abilities!
    First of all thank you very much for your time and I have given you some rep and I believe you have helped me with the path I want to take now I will apply at an Oxbridge college, LSE, Durham , Newcastle and Hull as these are what I believe would interest me most. However the implication of a Masters is not that bearing in terms of finance just time and I believe like you stated a masters at Cambridge or Oxford also with a high result in the LPC should give me a good chance of getting a training contract with a solicitor's firm? Why is it so God Dam competitive? If Oxford and Cambridge students are finding it difficult whats the point any other students studying law at lesser universities with the intention of becoming solicitors as surely they ( and potentially me) would have no chance compared to them.
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    Yeah, I noticed the rep and cheers! Haha, it's frustrating, but the best jobs are always the most competitive. It's the same story whether you want to enter law, banking, accountancy, medicine etc. The benefits will outweigh the disadvantages though Don't be disheartened by the high flying Oxbridgers. I bang on about university rep because if you have the oppourtunity to go to a better university you should, but it's not the be all and end all. Often the university you end up at is as much a reflection of how rebellious you were at 16-18, as it is an indicator of your academic ability. Intelligent, dedicated students tend to do well regardless of where they're put.

    Your choices seem solid. From what I remember from your original post, you've got extra-cirriculors/work experience already, so as well as building on that during the summer (if possible), start organising and articulating these experiences ready for your personal statement. If you're applying to Oxbridge you'll need to have it all done and dusted by October 15th, so the earlier you start on your personal statement the better. Tbh I don't see you getting knocked back from Hull or Newcastle. Both Oxford and Durham require LNAT so if you can look some past tests that'll be useful (particulary if you don't do a solid analytical humanities subject like English Literature or History). Having gone through an LSE cycle myself I can say that your personal statement may have the most bearing there. They have a rough personal statement guide on their website, which you should really follow (since it seems like a pretty solid template for any uni). Also note LSE have blacklisted subjects, so you'll want to make sure you don't have any more than one of these.

    Deciding between Oxbridge in general, and individual colleges is pretty much down to you. Though I don't think the 'statistics strategy' of applying to certain colleges for a greater chance of acceptance ever works, you may want to steer cleer of the most prestigous colleges at each (Christ Church/Bailiol/University etc. at Oxford, Trinity/St John's at Cambridge; Churchill at Cam is also insanely competitive for Law). Other than that pick the university/college where you feel most comfortable, and where you could imagine yourself being for three years. I have no direct experience of the Oxbridge admissions process though, but if you were to post in the Oxbridge forum there would be a hoarde of current/prospective students ready to help you. :yep:
    If Oxbridge , LSE and Durham all rejected me but newcastle accepted me and I got my first with lots of relevant extra - curriculars what and do very well on the LPC I must have a good chance surely of gaining a training contract? So stressful :mad:
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    I'm sure you would. If it's sounded like I've been laying into Newcastle I apologise, but it's not really up there with the top law schools (IMO, and the general consensus of people I've talked to/on here). After the elite I've continually mentioned, other good bets are Manchester, Warwick and Leiciester. Newcastle is probably slightly below those three, so you can see why you may be at a slight disadvantage. I think with your grades (which are certainly Oxbridge material), you have a very realistic shot at the top unis.

    If you worry about being rejected from Oxbridge, LSE and Durham then it may be wise to swap LSE for King's/Notts, which I believe are slightly less competitive. Of course, if you were very keen on LSE you may want to alter another one of your choices. Law is a bit of jackpot, but I would imagine you could get into one of the three.
    You have been invaluable help , thank you alot for your time and effort with me its people like you this country certainly lacks. I think if I don't get an offer from the elite law schools then I am more than happy to go to Newcaslte. Thank you very much and all the best.
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    My housemate slaved his arse off this final year - we didn't see him much cos he was studying every night - and only got a 2.1 at Newcastle doing law so it's not an easy ride, he's got 4 'A' A levels in all sorts of funky ***** like Latin too cos he got to his 6th form on a scholarship.

    To be fair he's doing his PGC? or whatever it's called at York and as far as I'm aware got a very good offer from the company that's sponsoring him to do the course. I'd have thought they're more interested in extra-curicular activities, he'd always been involved in things at school (like playing the violin :laugh: )
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    (Original post by Bossworld)
    My housemate slaved his arse off this final year - we didn't see him much cos he was studying every night - and only got a 2.1 at Newcastle doing law so it's not an easy ride, he's got 4 'A' A levels in all sorts of funky ***** like Latin too cos he got to his 6th form on a scholarship.

    To be fair he's doing his PGC? or whatever it's called at York and as far as I'm aware got a very good offer from the company that's sponsoring him to do the course. I'd have thought they're more interested in extra-curicular activities, he'd always been involved in things at school (like playing the violin :laugh: )
    what are you actually trying to get across too me? also only a 2.1 thats pretty good.
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    Cheers mate. Good luck and all the best!
    I think I have done pretty bad in my AS levels, I am really worried that not even newcastle will look at me now however my teachers are still adamant to predict me A*A*A but I am really nervous now. They are really bad. What do I do?
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    First of all, calm down. You don't have your results yet, and as such you shouldn't worry about grades you don't know you have. It's a fortnight before A-level results day, and there are few people awaiting results who feel completely stress-free.

    Secondly, how bad do you think you have done? For Law in general (top 30 unis) you should be hoping for at least ABBB, but more likely AABB. For the universities you're hoping to apply to, odds become quite slimer if you get worse than AAAB.
    oh god i think something like A (A/B) (A/B) B (B/C) so best case scenario AAABB worst case ABBBC I think I have blown it to be honest. I could honestly see it being worse. I can always re-take can't I?
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    That sounds pretty bad admittedly. When you first posted though you didn't seem to be worriedabout having underperformed? This makes me think that it could just be the stress of waiting for your results. It goes without saying that you can't do anything until you have your results, even if it does just confirm the worst.

    AAABB would not be a bad set of results. Indeed, you could apply to the aforementioned universities, and I'd be confident you wouldn't be left offerless (maybe 2/3/4 offers - depending on whether you still applied to Oxbridge/how well you did at interview). Anything lower than that, and for a subject as competitive as Law it gets tricky. Your worst case scenario would really mean readjusting where you apply (Oxbridge would be a very big reach, as would LSE I'd imagine). If you weren't willing to compromise on the standard of university you wanted to go to, you might want to consider taking a year out before applying. Prelim advice I'd give you (before you actually know your results) would be:

    - Stay calm. Yes, it's a cliche. Yes, it's easier said than done, but stressing yourself out won't help you - quite the opposite.

    - Look at which universities place a great amount of emphasis on the LNAT. The LNAT can be a good redeemer as it were, casting doubt on the geeky students who achieved high grades through an insane work ethic rather than any real flair/understanding of the law, whilst lifting up underperforming students who show a great deal of potential. There is a limited amount of prep you can do for it, but there is some: practice quesitons, familarising yourself with the style of the paper, time managment exercises etc. I hear there are a fair few similarities between the LNAT and the Critical Thinking A-level for example.

    - Start thinking more carefully about your personal statement. Law admission is somewhat of an uphill struggle anyway, but weaker grades makes it all the more harder. Your grades aren't so poor you'll be autofiltered so make sure that your personal statement puts you above the rest, and makes admissions tutors think twice about rejecting you. This will be very hard to do (you're competing against some of the most eloquent, articulate and organised young writers in the country) so looking at what you want to convey, and how you're going to sell yourself at an early stage is important. Regardless of how you do in your exams, you should really be looking at planning your personal statement now i.e list the kind of points/accomplishments you'll mention so you can start chopping and changing them in terms of relevance and importance.

    In regards to your last point, yes you can re-take these exams. The problem with this is that you won't be able to retake the exams until next January. A) The universities will have already made decisions on your application by that time. You used to be able to decline your grades and list them as 'pending' (meaning universities could only see your predicted grades, GCSEs etc.) but I think the system has been changed though I'm not sure - maybe someone else on here knows? B) The outcome could go either way. One or two extra exams are managable, but resitting lots of AS exams on top of harder A2 work can be suffocating. Don't allocate enough revision time to all your modules (which can be very difficult to do) and you could potentially screw up A2 as well.

    All in all, my advice is to wait until results day and try to relax until then. There's really nothing you can do at the moment. If you do badly, have fun drowning your sorrows, but get right back up again on the 17th, dust yourself off, and make the best out of a tricky situation.
    If they don't see the grade and see it as pending can this mean potentially I could say AAA (pending) (pending) i think this actually still stands, this is totally stressing me out now lol. My results come out on the 20th. The thing is its annoying me now and I honestly think i have screwed up , I dont really want to do LNAT.
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    Well, there's much you can do about the stress other than ride it out. I'm not sure if you can put some as pending, but put the actual grades down for others (if you did the university may jump to the conclusion that you failed these completely as opposed to got B/Cs). The system has changed recently, so one of your teachers could explain how it works more accurately than me (I'm sure this informations lurking around on TSR anyway).

    As for the LNAT - if you're applying to top unis you'd be going out of your way not to be doing the it. The big ones that don't use it are LSE and Cambridge - I think all the other 'elite' ones do. Like I said, in your case it may be a saving grace - you concievably have an advantage of those who didn't do any essay based A-levels!
    nothing wrong with northumbria law solicitor expempting honestly looks quite impressive.
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    There's nothing wrong with Northumbria, but with your grades you can certainly do better.
    what with aaabb at as level ? would that be good enough for newcastle would you think. I have a pretty good personal statement and refrence aswell. At the very least I just want to get into newcastle to be honest. Thanks again .
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    (Original post by ninety_nine)
    There's nothing wrong with Northumbria, but with your grades you can certainly do better.
    Hey I have just recieved my results AAAAD which I am content with and am more than prepared to retake that D however can I show it as pending when I send my university results? Been there from the beginning for me
 
 
 
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