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The Soc for People of 'GRDCT2008' Mk VI watch

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    Lol It's funny how I move a tiny bit to the left of where I sat last and the status of the connection changes from ''very poor'' to ''excellent''.
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    (Original post by Malsy)
    Lol It's funny how I move a tiny bit to the left of where I sat last and the status of the connection changes from ''very poor'' to ''excellent''.
    Got to love technology :p:.
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    (Original post by lozz2601)
    Uhhh pretty good thanks, can't really complain! It's gone farrrr too quickly though :p:

    (I think evvvvvvvvvvvvverry summer should be a gcse-esque summer...)
    Yeah, I definitely agree!
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    (Original post by natty_d)
    Three things I couldn't remember how to do at all :nah: :

    No 1. The curve with equation y=x^2 has been translated to give the curve f(x).
    Find f(x) in terms of x.

    (The curve in the photo only has the point 2, -4 on it at the lowest point of the parabola if that makes any sense :hmmmm:)
    The minimum of  g(x) = x^2 is at (0,0). How can you translate g(x) such that the minimum is at (2,-4)? What does this translation mean algebraicly?
    Hint 1:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    If the point (0,0) has been translated to the point (a, b), then the translation is a units horizontally (with positive meaning to the right, and negative meaning to the left), and b units vertically (with positive meaning up and negative meaning down).
    Hint 2:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    If  g(x) has been translated a units horizontally and b units vertically to get f(x), then  f(x) = g(x-a)+b .

    GHOSH's Massive Functions and Translations "Cheat Sheet"
    Let  f(x) be a function on x.

    A translation (shift) of k units upwards (in the positive y direction) is  f(x) + k .

    A translation (shift) of k units downwards (in the negative y direction) is  f(x) - k .

    A translation (shift) of k units to the right (in the positive x direction) is  f(x-k) .

    A translation (shift) of k units to the left (in the negative x direction) is  f(x+k) .

    A stretch (enlargement) away from the x-axis (in the y direction) of scale factor c is  c \times f(x) .

    A stretch (squash) towards the x-axis (in the y direction) of scale factor c is  \frac{1}{c} \times f(x) .

    A stretch (enlargement) away from the y-axis (in the x direction) of scale factor c is  f\left(x \times \frac{1}{c}\right) .

    A stretch (squash) towards the y-axis (in the x direction) of scale factor c is  f(c \times x) .

    I'll add a couple more, when I can think of some.

    N.B. It is useful to realise why these a true. For me, it helps to think of functions mapping to domains and codomains when understanding why these are true.
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    Cheers Mal :love:
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    babababa babybell

    ye so I've had a non-productive day
    *finished my physics homework though*
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    (Original post by GHOSH-5)
    Cheers Mal :love:

    no problem; :lovie: :love:
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    (Original post by GHOSH-5)
    The minimum of  g(x) = x^2 is at (0,0). How can you translate g(x) such that the minimum is at (2,-4)? What does this translation mean algebraicly?
    Hint 1:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    If the point (0,0) has been translated to the point (a, b), then the translation is a units horizontally (with positive meaning to the right, and negative meaning to the left), and b units vertically (with positive meaning up and negative meaning down).
    Hint 2:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    If  g(x) has been translated a units horizontally and b units vertically to get f(x), then  f(x) = g(x-a)+b .

    GHOSH's Massive Functions and Translations "Cheat Sheet"
    Let  f(x) be a function on x.

    A translation (shift) of k units upwards (in the positive y direction) is  f(x) + k .

    A translation (shift) of k units downwards (in the negative y direction) is  f(x) - k .

    A translation (shift) of k units to the right (in the positive x direction) is  f(x-k) .

    A translation (shift) of k units to the left (in the negative x direction) is  f(x+k) .

    A stretch (enlargement) away from the x-axis (in the y direction) of scale factor c is  c \times f(x) .

    A stretch (squash) towards the x-axis (in the y direction) of scale factor c is  \frac{1}{c} \times f(x) .

    A stretch (enlargement) away from the y-axis (in the x direction) of scale factor c is  f\left(x \times \frac{1}{c}\right) .

    A stretch (squash) towards the y-axis (in the x direction) of scale factor c is  f(c \times x) .

    I'll add a couple more, when I can think of some.

    N.B. It is useful to realise why these a true. For me, it helps to think of functions mapping to domains and codomains when understanding why these are true.
    John Locke's post above jogged my memory straight away. So my answer should be in the form in Hint 2. :dontknow:
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    I need to enjoy my last couple of weeks of hols. but for some reason I want them to be over with!
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    (Original post by Malsy)
    I need to enjoy my last couple of weeks of hols. but for some reason I want them to be over with!
    I want to be back at school now....I might go and pretend to be in y12 and see how long i don't get noticed for....
    :sigh:
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    :laugh: :p:
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    next year will be interesting; so will our classes-see who's dropped what and what teachers we have; ours have changed major-ly with different teachers etc. plus there's only going to be two form classes :sigh:
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    (Original post by Malsy)
    next year will be interesting; so will our classes-see who's dropped what and what teachers we have; ours have changed major-ly with different teachers etc. plus there's only going to be two form classes :sigh:
    They got rid of forms in the sixth form at school
    *at sports day we still were like 'woo go lewis' but still...we didn't lose for a change :lolwut:*

    I'm really interested to see whos stayed on...I think I might be the only person in chemistry and physics....:moon:
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    Yeah, classes are going to be even tinier. I guess it's a good thing, though.
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    Does anyone watch girls of the playboy mansion ?
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    No, but should I be doing? :holmes:
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    :bootyshake:
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    (Original post by natty_d)
    John Locke's post above jogged my memory straight away. So my answer should be in the form in Hint 2. :dontknow:
    :yep:
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    ɹoʇɐɹǝpoɯ uʍop ǝpısdn
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    okay that is COOL.
 
 
 
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