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Project Tuva - Feynman lectures courtesy of Bill Gates (FREE) Watch

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    I came across this website earlier on today and thought it might be of some interest to folk on here.

    "Project Tuva" allows you to watch 7 lectures presented by Richard Feynman at Cornell University in 1964. The project is funded by Bill Gates. I think it's great he's made it possible for anyone to view these online for FREE! You can also add your own notes to the lectures and you can also view various 'Extra' (for example, you can see pictures of galaxies using Worldwide Telescope.)

    Take a look here and see what you think
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    (Original post by CallumFR)
    I came across this website earlier on today and thought it might be of some interest to folk on here.

    "Project Tuva" allows you to watch 7 lectures presented by Richard Feynman at Cornell University in 1964. The project is funded by Bill Gates. I think it's great he's made it possible for anyone to view these online for FREE! You can also add your own notes to the lectures and you can also view various 'Extra' (for example, you can see pictures of galaxies using Worldwide Telescope.)

    Take a look here and see what you think
    hmm its pretty good but you could find the same thing
    if you search it in youtube
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    Thanks Callum,

    Very appetising! I previously only found 1 lecture of Feynman's in NewZealand. So thanks.


    Feynman says that Physics has an unsatisfactory aspect, as does Economics. He says that over the centuries, more & more complex laws of nature have been discovered and interestingly they obey complex mathematics. Like for example Newton's Gravity. But nothing can be said about the mechanism of gravity or why. I'm going to rename physics the DISMAL SCIENCE, instead of economics.

    I think with the new physics theories, reaching out to philosophy and before the big band makes the subject alot more fascinating.
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    Firstly, Economics isn't a science. Secondly, I'm pretty sure Physics has moved forward since Newton. Lastly, Big bang theory not Big band.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Firstly, Economics isn't a science. Secondly, I'm pretty sure Physics has moved forward since Newton. Lastly, Big bang theory not Big band.

    Feynman's style is quite unusual, but whether he was making a serious point or not, he was including Einstein, which is quite modern.

    I don't fully understand Feynman's 2nd lecture, because I understood that a different mechanism for gravity was found. Before there was just the inverse square law, no mechanism. Einstein revolutionised thinking, and the mechanism was that space around an object is bent, and the object merely follows the natural path in space, that is, there is no direct force on one object onto another, but a twisting of space.

    Einstein didn't accept the space-time idea immediately, but this does seem like a new mechanism?
 
 
 
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