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    Well, I missed my LSE offer for very stupid reasons and my gf (now ex) can't help but keep rub in the fact that I'm going to a '**** university', York.
    I'm not contesting whether it is or not, it's the only option I have now.
    But is PPE at York, and York in general, actually "****"? I was under the impression it was a fairly good uni, and PPE was it's flagship course, arguably second only to Oxford's course. Maybe I'm wrong though- enlighten me, please. Honest answers appreciated.
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    York is a great university. Your ex-girlfriend is just being a silly little quaint.
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    York and Warwick seem to be considered much of a muchness for PPE, Warwick being up and coming while York is established. Together they make the next step down from Oxford though, so no I wouldn't complain. York is a perfectly good uni and its PPE is very good.
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    (Original post by Economic Historian 1)
    Well, I missed my LSE offer for very stupid reasons and my gf (now ex) can't help but keep rub in the fact that I'm going to a '**** university', York.
    I'm not contesting whether it is or not, it's the only option I have now.
    But is PPE at York, and York in general, actually "sh*t"? I was under the impression it was a fairly good uni, and PPE was it's flagship course, arguably second only to Oxford's course. Maybe I'm wrong though- enlighten me, please. Honest answers appreciated.
    York is an excellent uni by any standard.
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    York is a beautiful city and , while I am not going there or even doing a course related to it, a lot of my friends applied there to do PPE and are going after not getting oxbridge offers so I wouldnt say so, also she sounds like a bit of a b***h if I am honest
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    I don't go there but York is a fantastic university: you should never have applied to any university you thought was bad. You should also have not let a girl mess up your studies.

    A part of me would much rather go to York than the LSE: the sensible part knows that the LSE is better for getting to the places I want to go, but the other part knows that the York experience would probably be more enjoyable.

    Just make the most of what you've got and learn from your mistakes this year.
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    My girlfriend studies English at York. It's a beautiful campus, filled with ickle squeezy baby ducks. It's a nice city too; you can catch a bus outside of Uni that takes you straight to town, as well as there being a supermarket on campus, stocking all the essentials (bread, milk, vodka). Morrisons isn't too far away either.

    A few of her housemates chose to do PPE, and they seem to enjoy it. I can't say much about the course (apart from it being established and respected), but the uni's jolly good.

    P.S. Your girlfriend sounds like a kant.
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    I'd pick York over LSE anyday. I don't much rate the campus - particularly accommodation - but you only live in halls for one year and then live in houses with friends, and the city seems like a lovely place to live and is really beautiful. And it seems to have a good student buzz and energy about it without being expensive, dirty, crowded, in your face etc like central London. These are just my preferences though.
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    Ignore your ex-girlfriend. York is an excellent university, highly regarded, and the PPE course is well-established, and as you say, one of their flagship courses.

    She's more than likely bitter about breaking up with you.
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    Big difference between LSE and York, but that's just me....meh. If you want to go into Finance, York has a very poor track record of getting people into finance...just check where previous PPE graduates have gone to work...its on the website somewhere.
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    Big difference between LSE and York, but that's just me....meh. If you want to go into Finance, York has a very poor track record of getting people into finance...just check where previous PPE graduates have gone to work...its on the website somewhere.
    Job prospects and prestige are not the only thing that matter about a University by a long shot.
    After all, if you dislike the place, the facilities, the town, the people and the course and teaching then it will matter very little that its prestigious and well regarded because you'll struggle to enjoy the course and your time there well enough to apply yourself.

    And in any case - it doesn't sound like the guy has any choice, so what's to complain about! York was the only other offer I held when Cambridge accepted me, but I can assure you if Cambridge didn't take me I wasn't going to turn my nose up at York! :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Job prospects and prestige are not the only thing that matter about a University by a long shot.
    After all, if you dislike the place, the facilities, the town, the people and the course and teaching then it will matter very little that its prestigious and well regarded because you'll struggle to enjoy the course and your time there well enough to apply yourself.
    in what way? provided you're smart you can do anything academic regardless, your surroundings make no difference.
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    (Original post by Economic Historian 1)
    Well, I missed my LSE offer for very stupid reasons and my gf (now ex) can't help but keep rub in the fact that I'm going to a '**** university', York.
    I'm not contesting whether it is or not, it's the only option I have now.
    But is PPE at York, and York in general, actually "sh*t"? I was under the impression it was a fairly good uni, and PPE was it's flagship course, arguably second only to Oxford's course. Maybe I'm wrong though- enlighten me, please. Honest answers appreciated.
    where's you're GF going? and without sounding like a ****, i know why you made that thread about TSR being **** now :p:

    York is no LSE but you didn't need me to tell you that but despite that, york is a top uni. Overall, it can be considered a top 10 uni. Also as far as i know, i do believe that PPE is one of it's flagship courses and can compete with oxford's course
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    Hmmm, well I actually chose Royal Holloway over York because I found the campus really ugly (concrete and muddy abyss...) but the city itself is lovely. Quite like Canterbury, in some respects.

    I actually know someone who does PPE at York and they're going into their third year. They're really enjoying it and agree the course is the closest to the one at Oxford.

    I don't think York is a bad university, it's just an acquired taste. Other than the architecture, I was put off by the amount the student reps talked about alcohol, pubs and clubs. I don't drink much and I was bored silly. Also, on the open day the people seemed really unfriendly and hard to talk to.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    in what way? provided you're smart you can do anything academic regardless, your surroundings make no difference.
    That's rubbish, I'm sorry. Your psychological happiness is very strongly affected by the friends you make, how happy you are living where you are. Equally the extent to which the course options are interesting and satisfying to you and the teaching/presentation are inspirational strongly affect how well you'll be motivated to work hard and do the reading.

    Capability to do well is only one part of actually doing well. Very few people have the brute discipline to force themselves to go through three years of doing something they don't like, and when people are doing that they tend to perform less well. I know very very very very many people for which this has been the case.
    Personally I can force myself to work hard at something I hate just because I care about the achievement at the end for an instrumental reason, but to give you an example...I applied myself in this way to A level Chemistry which I hated and only managed a C trying my hardest. I did zero work for English Literature (I read the set texts once and did no revision) and I got 100% in two of my exams and a high A. The point is if you're not interested in something and the course isn't matched to you and your abilities, then high intelligence and potential are going to be of very limited use.
    Also that example was from A level. University is nothing like A level. The level of work involved is much harder and if you aren't suited to it, then its a massive problem.

    As it happens, the thread starter might prefer LSE as a place/course/and so forth.
    But personally I would have definitely chosen York above LSE because I would be happier there and therefore more likely to achieve highly there.

    Also people on TSR have a exaggerated ideas about how much prestige influences your job prospects.
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    York is an awesome Uni, where is your ex going to uni?
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    That's rubbish, I'm sorry. Your psychological happiness is very strongly affected by the friends you make, how happy you are living where you are. Equally the extent to which the course options are interesting and satisfying to you and the teaching/presentation are inspirational strongly affect how well you'll be motivated to work hard and do the reading.

    Capability to do well is only one part of actually doing well. Very few people have the brute discipline to force themselves to go through three years of doing something they don't like, and when people are doing that they tend to perform less well. I know very very very very many people for which this has been the case.
    Personally I can force myself to work hard at something I hate just because I care about the achievement at the end for an instrumental reason, but to give you an example...I applied myself in this way to A level Chemistry which I hated and only managed a C trying my hardest. I did zero work for English Literature (I read the set texts once and did no revision) and I got 100% in two of my exams and a high A. The point is if you're not interested in something and the course isn't matched to you and your abilities, then high intelligence and potential are going to be of very limited use.
    Also that example was from A level. University is nothing like A level. The level of work involved is much harder and if you aren't suited to it, then its a massive problem.

    As it happens, the thread starter might prefer LSE as a place/course/and so forth.
    But personally I would have definitely chosen York above LSE because I would be happier there and therefore more likely to achieve highly there.
    meh, two different people, i could very happily live with no friends and not like the place i'm living in. If i'm going to do something, i do it regardless of the **** that i have to go through

    And going back to your example of english lit and chem, you've compared two completely different subjects where one there is a right and wrong and the other is subjective and you could probably blag it if you know the jist of things. Try and blag a chemistry exam knowing the jist of things and things won't go too well.

    And yea i know uni is nothing like A level but A level was nothing like GCSE and GCSE was nothing like key stage 2 or 3. People who succeed are the ones who adapt to their situation and if you can't do that then you're ****** either way even if you enjoy your uni
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    And yea i know uni is nothing like A level but A level was nothing like GCSE and GCSE was nothing like key stage 2 or 3. People who succeed are the ones who adapt to their situation and if you can't do that then you're ****** either way even if you enjoy your uni
    Are you at University right now?
    Just for the record, scientific evidence pretty strongly contradicts your opinion :p:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Are you at University right now?
    Just for the record, scientific evidence pretty strongly contradicts your opinion :p:
    nah i'm not, but this year i am.
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    (Original post by abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz)
    nah i'm not, but this year i am.
    Ok, well no offence but you might agree with me more after you've been on a course for awhile and have met enough other intelligent people who don't like their courses or environments.

    Your approach of 'adjust or die' is a bit idealistic. While in some senses the world is brutal like that, statistical trends suggest that the vast majority of human beings don't perform well or simply adjust when they're in a situation that they don't like. They can cope, certainly, but performance is really affected. Telling everybody to just lump it isn't actually going to result in most of them successfully managing to do just that. I think its possible you see this more at University than you do in a job. In many jobs you can get by just doing what's expected of you, and you're not assessed and rated against other people doing exactly the same work in the way that you are in education. (you still are assessed obviously, but its quite different.) - I have been in the workplace for a few years in a number of jobs, incidentally.
    The fact of the matter is that people don't actually have to chose courses and Universities they don't like. They can optimise their environment by thinking carefully, doing a bit of research and persevering. In a similar way, if you don't like a job environment you can take action to find a form of employment which is better suited to your personal skills.
    While in some situations people definitely do need to simply accept that something isn't ideal and lump it for awhile, in the long term this is really inadviseable and people who live in privileged western society largely have the ability to avoid inflicting this on themselves.
    University is definitely a long term example because it has intense constant demands. Three years is a hell of a long time if you're not happy with a course or environment.
 
 
 
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