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Muslims, am I allowed to go to my white friends funeral? Watch

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    (Original post by tazarooni89)



    In fact, the Qur'an even says this:

    And let those who cannot find a match keep chaste till Allah give them independence by His grace. And such of your slaves as seek a writing (of emancipation), write it for them if ye are aware of aught of good in them, and bestow upon them of the wealth of Allah which He hath bestowed upon you. Force not your slave-girls to whoredom that ye may seek enjoyment of the life of the world, if they would preserve their chastity. And if one force them, then (unto them), after their compulsion, lo! Allah will be Forgiving, Merciful. - 24:33

    i.e. If a slave wants their "freedom", it is to be provided to them in writing, along with some money.
    Depending on your interpretation of wealth. One taking could mean that freedom could only be given if he/she was to take Allah.
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    (Original post by JayB124)
    Depending on your interpretation of wealth. One taking could mean that freedom could only be given if he/she was to take Allah.
    Other translations say things like this:

    "give them something yourselves out of the means which Allah has given to you"


    At this period of time, the Arab law was that if a slave wants his freedom, it must be bought i.e. that either the slave, or a benefactor of the slave must pay the master to release him.

    According to Islam, a Muslim must follow the laws of the country or land that he lives in - however, from reading the Arabic text, it is clear that this verse is telling the person to give at least this amount money back to the slave as a gift.
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    must be a troll
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    Other translations say things like this:

    "give them something yourselves out of the means which Allah has given to you"


    At this period of time, the Arab law was that if a slave wants his freedom, it must be bought i.e. that either the slave, or a benefactor of the slave must pay the master to release him.

    According to Islam, a Muslim must follow the laws of the country or land that he lives in - however, from reading the Arabic text, it is clear that this verse is telling the person to give at least this amount money back to the slave as a gift.
    Well that's the exact same system white folk used back in the day of slavery.

    In all fairness though, ancient texts are up to a lot of interpretation and it isnt clear at all. The BNP and terrorist dont have to try very hard to find quotes for their purposes. And I'm sure you would be able to quote me endless verses of peace.

    This topic will probably get closed soon.
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    (Original post by JayB124)
    Well that's the exact same system white folk used back in the day of slavery.
    Is it? I don't really know that much about the western slavery systems back then. But in any case, the point is that (effectively) the Muslim master is supposed to release the slave without requiring payment for it, if the slave wishes to resign from this duty.

    In all fairness though, ancient texts are up to a lot of interpretation and it isnt clear at all. The BNP and terrorist dont have to try very hard to find quotes for their purposes. And I'm sure you would be able to quote me endless verses of peace.
    It is true that they are up for interpretation - but the third chapter of the Qur'an actually instructs people on how to interpret it as well.

    (This link explains it in detail: http://www.geocities.com/~abdulwahid...les/ayats.html )

    But I do think that if someone is taking the Qur'an as a whole, rather than picking out individual verses, then it becomes a lot less subject to one's own interpretation.

    For example "He who honours Muhammad honours God" could be interpreted to mean that Muhammad actually is God. But obviously, there are many verses in the Qur'an which debunk this interpretaton.
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    (Original post by saab_101)
    In fact, according to some hadith, when passing a graveyard with non-muslim graves, a muslim must say, "wa basharakum bin nar" - may you burn in the fire.
    Then I Guess Its just a case of Deciding how much of a commitment you have to your beliefs and religion. Do you follow it enough to abide by this? Or do you respect your friend more?

    In the case of your Dad, his racism makes my skin crawl. Im sorry to talk this way about your Dad. I dont mean to be personal. All racism is awful and i discourage it and have words with anyone I hear saying anything racist.

    It just gets me that racism tends now to be thought of as a white against all other ethnicities. (In ways youre quite right to think it)
    Our histories of white people are quite frankly embarrassing.
    However, in our multicultural society now, people are overlooking racism towards white people. People tend to get away with being racist to white people because it is part of a religion - which in my opinion is even worse! Because people love and follow religions. Why would you love and follow something that teaches racism? Something you have been fighting against for centuries?

    The world today continues to baffle me.
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    I totally agree with the majority about going to the funeral anyway. Not being allowed to go on those grounds is heinous. But I, for one, would like to hear from the OP...what have you decided to do? And what did your mother say about all of this?!
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    I don't care what any religion has to say about it. Being a decent human takes precedent. Rebel.
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    I felt sick reading the OP, and also I reckon that Anonymous 4 makes some very powerful arguments. I've sort of been through what you have... if you want you can PM me anonymous 4.
    • #6
    #6

    It's not happening, you're screwed either way.

    Good news, one day when you are able to beat seven shades of **** out of them on sight your feelings will not be disregarded so easily. Unfortunately you're female and hence screwed.
    • #7
    #7

    You know you remind me of me at 15! My god you poor thing. I was exactly exactly like you. I am 20 now. I was bought up being a muslim but I am an athiest now. I don't believe in god or anything. This is what happens when families drill religion into your head.

    Go forget what your dad says and trust me as you grow older you will be able to stand up to your dad - if you do not stand up to your dad then he will continue controlling you TRUST ME.

    And no offence to other muslims but the hadith means nothing! It's just some random words of random human beings who lived ages ago it might and might have not even been true!

    Don't listen to your dad - he is pathetic for preventing you to go - as I grew older I realised he was able to control me with his wicked ways and hence why I grew up with a rubbish childhood - I started to self harm etc but I dont recommend you do that.

    JUST GO! Parents from back home will never understand - they will want to get you married to some bloody religious **** who will do the same to you - focus on your career and your studies nothing else.

    If you dont go I will take you xx Please please do keep me updated.
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    Sorry to be abrupt, but your dad sounds like a horrible, insensitive, intolerant prick. I'm Muslim, but the majority of my family aren't. Would your dad expect me not to cry if my uncle, aunt or brother died?

    The Prophet loved his non-Muslim uncle and cried after his death. And what about his Jewish neighbour he was so good to? Does your dad look down on that too?

    I think in years to come, when you're no longer under your dad's control and able to make your own decisions, you will regret not going.
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    Omg
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    Wow, here's a whole side to Islam that I never knew existed...

    Normally I try to be respectful but that's just ****** up. (The bit about burning in the fire I mean)

    Your dad is just an ********, go anyway.
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    Dude that really sucks...I can't say this strongly enough - just go and do whats right by your friend...deal with the consequences later
 
 
 
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