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    (Original post by Democracy)
    No, not unless you buy into Daily Express hysteria.
    You obviously havent had your head kicked in by a gang of pregnant teens with benefit forms in their hands and jeremy kyle t-shirts on while they talk in their stupid 'gangsta' speak in their modifyed cars while they speed and do handbreak turns because they are so 'hard'

    ARGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH
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    Yes.

    "Every element that sustained prior forms of British and English life is declining or has dipped down. Marriage in the family is in turmoil,and hardly anyone is marrying. Procreation amongst our own group is down. Crime and violence is up by every register. Vandalism, social misbehaviour and mild to evident chaos is semi permanent, and people who live on estates have to deal with it 24/7. Areas in our towns and cities are semi-segregated"-

    Jonathan Bowden,2008.
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    Every society has its discomforts. I don't think our current discomforts are more major or urgent that the discomforts of British societies of past times -- they're different discomforts, but not ones that justify calling British society "broken" any more than in the past.
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    No, of course not. Sure things could always be better, but what's remotely wrong with this country? The enduring legacy of 60s and 70s architecture is about the worst thing I can say for it - and I haven't heard Mr Cameron posit a solution to that yet.

    Youngsters start listening to loud music on tube trains and suddenly there's a moral panic. I mean, really...
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    Yes, it is pretty broken. Having all old people fear youths and think they're going to rob them when you offer them help, there's a lot of racism in certain places (more common in less well-off places). There's still a huge social class divide, though Britain's always had that I suppose.

    It depends on the area you live in in my opinion. I know in certain towns people can be very sociable, greeting strangers each morning etc. Though in a lot of areas, it seems people prefer to just stay quiet, and ignore people walking in the streets (you'll only understand how unsociable Britain is when you've been to many other countries).

    Not all of British society is broken, no; but a lot of it is. Chavs probably being the main reason, along with the media - making some girls in this country actually want to starve themselves so that they look 'attractive' and so on. It can be resolved, but firstly we need to get out of this recession and try and lift people's spirits a bit.
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    It's because of nonwhite immigrants like me that society is broken.

    We don't work and steal all your jobs and this causes immense instability.

    Chucking us out is the ONLY answer. Better education, healthcare and infrastructure is totally irrelevant to the problems of the UK.

    IT'S ALL OUR FAULT.
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    Depends where.
    I think the situation is different in say North Yorkshire than Greater London.
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    Society has never been perfect, stop looking at the past with rose tinted goggles you fools etc etc
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    (Original post by Ben F)
    Yes, it is pretty broken. Having all old people fear youths and think they're going to rob them when you offer them help
    So in fact it's the perception rather than any reality? It does seem the case that Britain is unjustifiably scared of its youth.

    there's a lot of racism in certain places (more common in less well-off places). There's still a huge social class divide, though Britain's always had that I suppose.
    People are naturally racist; I think we've done quite well to overcome that.
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    Definitely.
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    Not at all. In fact, the complete opposite for people that actually join clubs, etc.

    I'd hate to be like the US though, with some of their redneck, scientologist and extremist views. I despise the way some Americans go to those church events and the 'priest' is more like an MC (screaming 'PRAISE THE LORD' and so on, sometimes it gets pretty crazy). I appreciate that it does not apply to many of them, but it irritates me nonetheless.
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    Cameron SLAMS the broken society.

    Oh wait, shouldn't he be handling it gently?

    Let someone who know's what they're doing mend it.

    squish.
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    The only thing that is "broken" is the unwavering subservience to the tabloids' fear-mongering and nonsense.
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    (Original post by kidpoker)
    You obviously havent had your head kicked in by a gang of pregnant teens with benefit forms in their hands and jeremy kyle t-shirts on while they talk in their stupid 'gangsta' speak in their modifyed cars while they speed and do handbreak turns because they are so 'hard'

    ARGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHH

    Neither have you, you ******* moron.
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    (Original post by smalltownboy)
    Neither have you, you ******* moron.
    I did. it was horrible. ((
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    Its impossible to say. What is "society" in the first place - is it some universal thing? We all have different ideas on what the role of society should be - so whether people say yes/no is meaningless, it all depends on the reason behind that opinion, and that individuals definition of both society and of 'broken'.

    Anyway my answer is yes to some aspects, and no to some aspects. But I think things could be a lot better, but even that poses problems. Some see nationalism as the solution, I disagree and see liberalism as the solution. It's all very complicated. :sad:
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    There is a programme about this on BBC 2 today at 11:20
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    We need to reverse back to the Good ol' days™!!!!!!!!
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    (Original post by _Ravi_)
    There is a programme about this on BBC 2 today at 11:20
    well spotted.

    The program ended by saying next week's program will be asking people what they want to give to society, rather than what they want to receive . . good stuff!
    That will bring out creative juices.

    Given the facilities, would you, or your local youth want to form a local band, football team (or other sport), car-fixing or clothes designing business?
    . .. as an alternative to getting drunk, into fights or "up the duff" with an STD?
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    The death of respect, episode 2 was one of the most interesting programmes I've seen for ages.

    It included a Barrister who sees broken families at war in court day in, day out.
    And his is one oif 100 such courts up and down the country.

    He says Politicians have mainly never seen this and from his privileged position he says it's time to publicly debate our attitude to marriage and drop this fear of offending some people.
    We now have the data to analyse our "social experiment" of widely opting out of marriage.

    Marriage is now at it's lowest occurrence since records began in the 1850s, he comments that the attitude / talk in co-habiting relationships without long-term commitment is me/you; my turn/your turn instead of we/us/our.
    Marriage enables people to understand values such as commitment to someone other than outrselves, security and sense of being, worth & value . . individualism erodes this.
    Of course our commitment to other social groupings such as church, social clubs and long-term work arrangements have also gone.

    He also spoke of the enormous emotional/mental and financial cost (private and public purse) of family break-up and it's effect on children.

    .. . but the programme was also quite inspiring for the first half-hour as it looked at success stories from poor areas of Moss-side, Sheffield and Stockton where a primary school has become a social hub, a few teachers have changed the attitude of the whole community.

    Contrast that with affluent Stubbington near Farnham where there is no such community focus and the local political structure has been eroded making it ineffective, there is no voice, unlike abroad.
 
 
 
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