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Long Term Career Plans for Nurses watch

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    I just thought it would be interesting to find out what everyone has got planned for their nursing careers after they have qualified! i.e. what branch, specialising in particular areas, teaching, research, etc etc?
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    Well so far, the work I've done over the last couple of years has been around the sexual health and HIV arena and have seemed to have found a passion for it. However, I've tried not to let this colour my vision too much in case I miss opportunities to explore other avenues during my training. For the last 4 or 5 years, I've done a variety of voluntary work in all different areas and I have to say sexual health is an area I like. But that wasn't in a 'registered nurse' capacity, which may pose a slightly different view or scope on what I've already experienced.

    I think it's important that before you specialise in whatever area you want to go into, you should work on a general/acute ward for the first couple of years just to set a foundation. People at work and friends who are nurses seem to really stress this - is this an out of date view or does anybody think it is still vital? However excited and enthused I may be about wanting to go into sexual health, especially HIV, I think it would be worth doing the general bit first of all. If I still want to go into sexual health/HIV after I've qualified I could start my career in a number of ways for the first couple of years. Cardiology may be good to work to start with, as a lot of HIV positive patients have associative-cardiac problems too. Urology and gynaecology will also be very useful as it's dealing with the genito-urinary tracts which is what sexual health is mostly about. Dermatology may be an area to go into as well, thinking about the the very prevalence of human papillomavirus. Even working on an acute/general ward to start with won't be a bad thing to do, as at least you'll understand a good variety of health problems, illnesses and diseases.

    So lot's to think about, but I've decided not to think too much about it right now. I've got 3 years of training to do first! I do want to work my way up the career ladder in nursing, staying as clinical as I can, although I may have to appreciate the higher you go the further away you move from patient contact! I think eventually I would like to go into teaching. I remember my grandad saying that he never had an apprentice when he worked as a blacksmith (for 60 years!) and always said his knowledge would die with him - so I kind of feel the same about whatever I may/will learn one day to pass on to others.

    You never know I may completely change my mind by the time I've qualified! However, I don't think I will...(some might say that's unhealthy to think like that!).
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    (Original post by Roo90)
    Well so far, the work I've done over the last couple of years has been around the sexual health and HIV arena and have seemed to have found a passion for it. However, I've tried not to let this colour my vision too much in case I miss opportunities to explore other avenues during my training. For the last 4 or 5 years, I've done a variety of voluntary work in all different areas and I have to say sexual health is an area I like. But that wasn't in a 'registered nurse' capacity, which may pose a slightly different view or scope on what I've already experienced.

    I think it's important that before you specialise in whatever area you want to go into, you should work on a general/acute ward for the first couple of years just to set a foundation. People at work and friends who are nurses seem to really stress this - is this an out of date view or does anybody think it is still vital? However excited and enthused I may be about wanting to go into sexual health, especially HIV, I think it would be worth doing the general bit first of all. If I still want to go into sexual health/HIV after I've qualified I could start my career in a number of ways for the first couple of years. Cardiology may be good to work to start with, as a lot of HIV positive patients have associative-cardiac problems too. Urology and gynaecology will also be very useful as it's dealing with the genito-urinary tracts which is what sexual health is mostly about. Dermatology may be an area to go into as well, thinking about the the very prevalence of human papillomavirus. Even working on an acute/general ward to start with won't be a bad thing to do, as at least you'll understand a good variety of health problems, illnesses and diseases.

    So lot's to think about, but I've decided not to think too much about it right now. I've got 3 years of training to do first! I do want to work my way up the career ladder in nursing, staying as clinical as I can, although I may have to appreciate the higher you go the further away you move from patient contact! I think eventually I would like to go into teaching. I remember my grandad saying that he never had an apprentice when he worked as a blacksmith (for 60 years!) and always said his knowledge would die with him - so I kind of feel the same about whatever I may/will learn one day to pass on to others.

    You never know I may completely change my mind by the time I've qualified! However, I don't think I will...(some might say that's unhealthy to think like that!).
    Sounds like you've got it all mapped out!! I think working in acute/general is still very much advised in mental health, the area I'm working in, so that you can consolidate your knowledge and experience before moving on and specialising. I would like to do loads of research and teaching before working in the community.
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    I'd like to work possibly with a mother and baby team: in regards to post natal depression and other illnesses,

    or maybe some service users with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I'm planning to focus on one of these for my electives. Yet no idea what I want to do in the long term. x
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    (Original post by Roo90)
    Well so far, the work I've done over the last couple of years has been around the sexual health and HIV arena and have seemed to have found a passion for it. However, I've tried not to let this colour my vision too much in case I miss opportunities to explore other avenues during my training. For the last 4 or 5 years, I've done a variety of voluntary work in all different areas and I have to say sexual health is an area I like. But that wasn't in a 'registered nurse' capacity, which may pose a slightly different view or scope on what I've already experienced.

    I think it's important that before you specialise in whatever area you want to go into, you should work on a general/acute ward for the first couple of years just to set a foundation. People at work and friends who are nurses seem to really stress this - is this an out of date view or does anybody think it is still vital? However excited and enthused I may be about wanting to go into sexual health, especially HIV, I think it would be worth doing the general bit first of all. If I still want to go into sexual health/HIV after I've qualified I could start my career in a number of ways for the first couple of years. Cardiology may be good to work to start with, as a lot of HIV positive patients have associative-cardiac problems too. Urology and gynaecology will also be very useful as it's dealing with the genito-urinary tracts which is what sexual health is mostly about. Dermatology may be an area to go into as well, thinking about the the very prevalence of human papillomavirus. Even working on an acute/general ward to start with won't be a bad thing to do, as at least you'll understand a good variety of health problems, illnesses and diseases.

    So lot's to think about, but I've decided not to think too much about it right now. I've got 3 years of training to do first! I do want to work my way up the career ladder in nursing, staying as clinical as I can, although I may have to appreciate the higher you go the further away you move from patient contact! I think eventually I would like to go into teaching. I remember my grandad saying that he never had an apprentice when he worked as a blacksmith (for 60 years!) and always said his knowledge would die with him - so I kind of feel the same about whatever I may/will learn one day to pass on to others.

    You never know I may completely change my mind by the time I've qualified! However, I don't think I will...(some might say that's unhealthy to think like that!).
    lol it is unhealthy to think like that..go into your training with an open mind, i certainly didn't have such a steadfast career plan before i started training!!!
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    Is it wrong the only thing in looking ahead too right now is qualifying...or even just passing my CFP assignments/exams?! lol..or even getting through tomorrows lectures on literature critiquing....

    I'm kind of interested in critical care, I've enjoyed doing first aid and first response work so working in A&E or ICU is interesting me right now, long term wise i'd like to start off working as a staff nurse, get married..have a few kids, and i think i'll definately take some time out then out of my career or go part time, then maybe consider doing a masters or advanced nursing, maybe looking into going into specialist nursing, practitioner..consultant etc etc

    as for teaching, well i think i'll miss the clinical contact!!! Loads of areas interest me right now, so i guess its just seeing how i find each placement and where my career takes me. I'm spending a few weeks in london later this year working with some research and HCA work on some clinics, so maybe going into that area may interest me? :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Is it wrong the only thing in looking ahead too right now is qualifying...or even just passing my CFP assignments/exams?! lol..or even getting through tomorrows lectures on literature critiquing....

    I'm kind of interested in critical care, I've enjoyed doing first aid and first response work so working in A&E or ICU is interesting me right now, long term wise i'd like to start off working as a staff nurse, get married..have a few kids, and i think i'll definately take some time out then out of my career or go part time, then maybe consider doing a masters or advanced nursing, maybe looking into going into specialist nursing, practitioner..consultant etc etc

    as for teaching, well i think i'll miss the clinical contact!!! Loads of areas interest me right now, so i guess its just seeing how i find each placement and where my career takes me. I'm spending a few weeks in london later this year working with some research and HCA work on some clinics, so maybe going into that area may interest me? :dontknow:
    As a teacher you could be a lecturer practitioner - a few days teaching and the others in direct contact - perfect mix I think! Literature critiquing.... makes me shudder at the thought. Definitely enjoy that!
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    (Original post by herbal bug)
    I'd like to work possibly with a mother and baby team: in regards to post natal depression and other illnesses,

    or maybe some service users with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I'm planning to focus on one of these for my electives. Yet no idea what I want to do in the long term. x
    wow that sounds interesting. That's 2 areas that I'd never even thought of working in!
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    \hopefully after getting some experience in somewhere such as a&e/ theatres I'd be interested in going into midwifery. And then perhaps a masters at some point also. I am rather keen on doing as much clinical and research as i can, would defo try and get up to PhD level.
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    (Original post by Jason1990)
    \hopefully after getting some experience in somewhere such as a&e/ theatres I'd be interested in going into midwifery. And then perhaps a masters at some point also. I am rather keen on doing as much clinical and research as i can, would defo try and get up to PhD level.
    so what made you stop the politics degree? politics to nursing is a massive change!
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    you are a number you are a qualified bum on a seat , because nursing does not have formal post registration specialisms you can be moved at the whim nursing management, forget having a career plan, if it happens it happens
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    you are a number you are a qualified bum on a seat , because nursing does not have formal post registration specialisms you can be moved at the whim nursing management, forget having a career plan, if it happens it happens
    That's a rather cynical view don't you think? I know for a fact the job I'm going into now that I can't be moved 'at their whim' and none of the things I want to do in my longer term career will happen without my input. If I want to work in the community it's me that has to find those jobs; If I want to do more research or training it's me that has to find those posts. It's a shame you don't have any longer term plans and are happy with 'what happens, happens.'
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    smilee it's not cynical it's the reality of the NHS under zanuliarbore, where A4C was perverted if people banded 'wrongly' ... by sudden decisions to have skill mix reviews which ripped the heart out of teams and put the public at risk to meet some pointless metric or to meet some false assumption about banding and budgets.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    smilee it's not cynical it's the reality of the NHS under zanuliarbore, where A4C was perverted if people banded 'wrongly' ... by sudden decisions to have skill mix reviews which ripped the heart out of teams and put the public at risk to meet some pointless metric or to meet some false assumption about banding and budgets.
    i really have no clue what you're talking about.... i was talking about career plans. You can still have a career plan and make it happen despite all of the above.
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    (Original post by smilee172)
    That's a rather cynical view don't you think? I know for a fact the job I'm going into now that I can't be moved 'at their whim' and none of the things I want to do in my longer term career will happen without my input. If I want to work in the community it's me that has to find those jobs; If I want to do more research or training it's me that has to find those posts. It's a shame you don't have any longer term plans and are happy with 'what happens, happens.'

    don't feed the idiot/troll
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    anna you are a fine one to talk about trolling

    come back when you've actually got something of value to say ...
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    zippyRN, I've worked in the NHS for about 2 years now so I guess I'm still an NHS baby. But from this thread and others you do seem to be quite cynical and down-putting towards other people wanting to go into the nursing - has something disgruntled you? Or jealousy? I can't work it out...But may be I don't need to.

    You make nursing sound as though it's a bad career choice - and it's exactly what nursing doesn't need right now with trying to attract more people into the profession. There are loads of people in the NHS who are cynical and I hope I'm not because I actively make sure I don't. My advice would be to everyone just ignore the cynics! Nursing is so enjoyable and is better off with out cynicism.
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    (Original post by Roo90)
    zippyRN, I've worked in the NHS for about 2 years now so I guess I'm still an NHS baby. But from this thread and others you do seem to be quite cynical and down-putting towards other people wanting to go into the nursing - has something disgruntled you? Or jealousy? I can't work it out...But may be I don't need to.

    You make nursing sound as though it's a bad career choice - and it's exactly what nursing doesn't need right now with trying to attract more people into the profession. There are loads of people in the NHS who are cynical and I hope I'm not because I actively make sure I don't. My advice would be to everyone just ignore the cynics! Nursing is so enjoyable and is better off with out cynicism.

    he's just attention seeking, it is easy to be cynical after a bad day, and yes..it's not the perfect career, but its just remembering what nursing 'is'. Nursing unfortunately isn't always enjoyable, and..it's almost 100% sure that you WILL be cynical occasionally once you're in your training or even a NQ, it happens to all of us, sort of a right of passage
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    (Original post by Roo90)
    zippyRN, I've worked in the NHS for about 2 years now so I guess I'm still an NHS baby. But from this thread and others you do seem to be quite cynical and down-putting towards other people wanting to go into the nursing - has something disgruntled you? Or jealousy? I can't work it out...But may be I don't need to.

    You make nursing sound as though it's a bad career choice - and it's exactly what nursing doesn't need right now with trying to attract more people into the profession. There are loads of people in the NHS who are cynical and I hope I'm not because I actively make sure I don't. My advice would be to everyone just ignore the cynics! Nursing is so enjoyable and is better off with out cynicism.
    well said!
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    (Original post by Roo90)
    zippyRN, I've worked in the NHS for about 2 years now so I guess I'm still an NHS baby. But from this thread and others you do seem to be quite cynical and down-putting towards other people wanting to go into the nursing - has something disgruntled you? Or jealousy? I can't work it out...But may be I don't need to.
    I i've been a qualified Nurse just shy of 8 years and worked in the NHS since qualifying, yes i'm disgruntled , disgruntled with the way zanuliarbore has treated the NHS as a political football and that early promise has become a culture of pointless metrics and an ever growing army of none clinicians dictating how care is(not) delivered and how patients are (not effectively) cared for.

    the NHS is currently hitting the targets and missing the point thanks to zanuliarbore

    Agenda for change is a wonderful system unfortunately the trusts were allowed to pervert it and arbitralily downgrade, demote and move peopel out of speciality thanks to 'skill mix reviews' that were triggered by staff being banded 'wrongly' in the eyes of the bean counters, despite the hype and flannel put across by certain people this has resulted in a diminished service and the loss of a personnel to other jobs diminishing services further

    You make nursing sound as though it's a bad career choice
    at the moment it is as all the promises are empty , thanks to the traditionally trained muppets that make up the majority of NHS nursing managers and their utter inability to support and develop staff, learn when to say no to lay managers and their culture inculcation to defer to Doctors

    - and it's exactly what nursing doesn't need right now with trying to attract more people into the profession. There are loads of people in the NHS who are cynical and I hope I'm not because I actively make sure I don't. My advice would be to everyone just ignore the cynics! Nursing is so enjoyable and is better off with out cynicism.
    the only way to improve nursing is to sack a significant proportion of RNs currently in practice because they are unwilling or unable to develop the service and/or are so *****y and backstabbing that their bullying behaviours drive significant numbers of staff to illness or worse ( e.g. suicide as happened in a trust i worked for )
 
 
 
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