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Daniel
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Report 17 years ago
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Hello,

Funnily enough, every time I hear the phrase "good for you" spoken - as well as used in written
dialogues - it sounds somewhat ironical, if not bitingly sarcastic, according to the context.
Q: Can I still use it to utter sincere approval?

I also ask you please answer these questions: 1 How would you describe the phrase in terms of
grammar? A complement of implied "This is/That's/It's…"? 2 Can the phrase occasionally have phrasal
or clausal extensions e.g. "good for you + to-inf", "good for you + ing-form", "good for you +
that-clause"?

Best regards,

Daniel
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Cybercypher
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Report 17 years ago
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[email protected] (Daniel) burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> Hello,[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Funnily enough, every time I hear the phrase "good for you" spoken[/q1]
[q1]> - as well as used in written dialogues - it sounds somewhat ironical, if not bitingly sarcastic,[/q1]
[q1]> according to the context.[/q1]
[q1]> Q: Can I still use it to utter sincere approval?[/q1]

I'd estimate that "Good for you!" is used at least as frequently ironically or sarcastically as it
is seriously. The more I think about it, the more it seems something to say to a child who has just
done succeeded in doing something or doing it very well for the first time. I would probably avoid
trying to use it sincerely and say something like "How wonderful!" or "That's great!" There is no
reason to stick the "for you" in there, because it suggests a contrast between the good thing that's
happened to the listener but not to the speaker. If you leave out "for you", what is left is
insufficient: "Good!"

[q1]> I also ask you please answer these questions: 1 How would you describe the phrase in terms of[/q1]
[q1]> grammar? A complement of implied "This is/That's/It's"?[/q1]

[q1]> 2 Can the phrase occasionally have phrasal or clausal extensions[/q1]
[q1]> e.g. "good for you + to-inf", "good for you + ing-form", "good for you + that-clause"?[/q1]

There are two ways of using the phrase. One is the exclamatory phrase "Good for you!" and another is
a full sentence with a prop "it" subject or an elided sentence without the "it": ]

"Good for you that he didn't notice that you weren't wearing socks".

This one can be translated to mean "You are lucky that he didn't notice
. . ."

"It's good for you to take some time off right now".

This is generally going to be a sincere statement and would probably be phrased in another way if
someone wanted to be sarcastic.
--
Franke
0
John Warner
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Report 17 years ago
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G'day,

"Good for you!" in Australian is a more formal sentence of encouragement than, "Good on you!",
pronounced "G'donya!" In a longer sendence it has other meanings.

Best, John in Sydney.

... [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]
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