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    just curious, would it be better to have a two page CV with pictures, or have a plain CV with a design portfolio when it goes to applying for jobs?
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    I just printed off my regular text 2 page CV (double side of A4), and then a fold out graphic mini-portfolio with it, which I folded the A4 CV into. i've seen examples where people have put images alongside their CV (sort of in the margin), but my view is that for A4, the images become so tiny that its not worth including them - you can scarcely see anything.
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    Yeah yeah yeahs are awesome btw :yep:

    I don't do the subject, but IMO a portfolio will look more professional.
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    thanks paperclip.


    jrhart, what if youre sending the CV as a pdf over email?
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    thanks paperclip.


    jrhart, what if youre sending the CV as a pdf over email?
    two attachments, one the pdf of your portfolio, one the 2 pp of cv.

    i would strongly urge sending physical copies to your top 20 firms though. there is something important about the choice of paper you use, the way that its folded, the way you write out the address label that tells the firm so much more about what you're like than just opening a pdf
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    I'm applying for Allies and Morrison, which is pretty much a top ten architecture firm. although its only for work experience for next year but they need applications a year ahead.

    i thought there won't be much emphasis on CV and portfolio if its by a first year student?
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    I'm applying for Allies and Morrison, which is pretty much a top ten architecture firm. although its only for work experience for next year but they need applications a year ahead.

    i thought there won't be much emphasis on CV and portfolio if its by a first year student?
    sorry. I meant your top 20 choices, not the top 20 firms. I mean the ones you are most keen to work for, not their status in rankings. If you are just applying to one, then I'd really go for hard copy. Firms are spammed by hundreds of emailed CVs all the time because its free to send them by email. Simply by virtue of the fact that you've had to print it and post it tells them you are more serious than someone who's just mass emailing their cv out.
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    just curious, would it be better to have a two page CV with pictures, or have a plain CV with a design portfolio when it goes to applying for jobs?
    Mine is a 2 page CV and 5 pages of sample work A4 format. The CV is plain but well laid out, font and proportions are nice.

    the 5 or so pages of work are basically my best projects condensed onto an a4 sheets.

    I agree with Mr jrhartley with regards to sending it by post. It is a hell of a lot better than sending an email. But even better than sending it by email is delivering it to your top choices by hand and asking to speak to someone there and then. If not then to make an appointment to speak to them and to return maybe a day or two later. I know its just work experience for you and you're not looking for a job but going that extra mile really stands out.

    If most top choices are in London then it should take a day to get around, say, 5 offices. 2 before lunch and 3 after. Repeat until you've been to everywhere you want to go to.

    I have just returned from a second job hunting excursion on the continent, before I went I sent about 40-50 applications to top firms by email. From this I got 5 rejections and 1 interview - the rest haven't replied (you'll find the vast majority don't bother replying). I visited around 12-15 firms and knocked on the office door and asked to speak to someone - I secured 6 interviews, got thrown out of one office and the rest took my sample work pack and I never heard from them again. But still around a 50% success rate is still good.
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    how many in your year quiller have managed to sort themselves out with placements so far? any leniency being demonstrated from the wsa because of the economic situation vis a vis the requirements for year 4?
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    how many in your year quiller have managed to sort themselves out with placements so far? any leniency being demonstrated from the wsa because of the economic situation vis a vis the requirements for year 4?
    that i know of... about 7 from 68 have jobs. + say... 3-4 that I don't know about. Still leaves only 10- 12 people with something, and I reckon about a third of those are working for their parents in their office.

    The WSA have given us the standard talk - they will consider related areas as experience but as far as I know they haven't dropped the requirements to 6 months yet and 4th Yr chair was avoiding committing and discussions are ongoing - I think they're waiting to see how many people have jobs before they change their standards.
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    (Original post by Quiller)
    Mine is a 2 page CV and 5 pages of sample work A4 format. The CV is plain but well laid out, font and proportions are nice.

    the 5 or so pages of work are basically my best projects condensed onto an a4 sheets.

    I agree with Mr jrhartley with regards to sending it by post. It is a hell of a lot better than sending an email. But even better than sending it by email is delivering it to your top choices by hand and asking to speak to someone there and then. If not then to make an appointment to speak to them and to return maybe a day or two later. I know its just work experience for you and you're not looking for a job but going that extra mile really stands out.

    If most top choices are in London then it should take a day to get around, say, 5 offices. 2 before lunch and 3 after. Repeat until you've been to everywhere you want to go to.

    I have just returned from a second job hunting excursion on the continent, before I went I sent about 40-50 applications to top firms by email. From this I got 5 rejections and 1 interview - the rest haven't replied (you'll find the vast majority don't bother replying). I visited around 12-15 firms and knocked on the office door and asked to speak to someone - I secured 6 interviews, got thrown out of one office and the rest took my sample work pack and I never heard from them again. But still around a 50% success rate is still good.

    did you write about the projects in your portfolio, or just had the images on their own.

    i'm tempted to make a booklet type portfolio, or would a simple thick paper and blind would be a more simple approach.
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    (Original post by Quiller)
    Mine is a 2 page CV and 5 pages of sample work A4 format. The CV is plain but well laid out, font and proportions are nice.

    the 5 or so pages of work are basically my best projects condensed onto an a4 sheets.

    I agree with Mr jrhartley with regards to sending it by post. It is a hell of a lot better than sending an email. But even better than sending it by email is delivering it to your top choices by hand and asking to speak to someone there and then. If not then to make an appointment to speak to them and to return maybe a day or two later. I know its just work experience for you and you're not looking for a job but going that extra mile really stands out.

    If most top choices are in London then it should take a day to get around, say, 5 offices. 2 before lunch and 3 after. Repeat until you've been to everywhere you want to go to.

    I have just returned from a second job hunting excursion on the continent, before I went I sent about 40-50 applications to top firms by email. From this I got 5 rejections and 1 interview - the rest haven't replied (you'll find the vast majority don't bother replying). I visited around 12-15 firms and knocked on the office door and asked to speak to someone - I secured 6 interviews, got thrown out of one office and the rest took my sample work pack and I never heard from them again. But still around a 50% success rate is still good.
    i tried the door knocking approach once. I once did it at Jacobs and didnt get quite pass the security and got fobbed off by the receptionist who claimed they didnt have a hr department in the building. i think it maybe easier to do it at a smaller firm then a multinational company.
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    did you write about the projects in your portfolio, or just had the images on their own.

    i'm tempted to make a booklet type portfolio, or would a simple thick paper and blind would be a more simple approach
    Well I composed pages which I felt got over the main idea of the project with a select few drawings. I had a little box in the corner of the sheet with the location of the project and a sentence or two about it.

    Make whatever type of portfolio you'd feel most comfortable doing. Make sure its on nice paper. Mine was 220gsm (the max my inkjet could take) and a lot of places thought the drawings were originals because the paper took the ink so well. The booklet type might work like this with an A3 sheet:

    You take an A3 sheet and fold it in half and then take one of the A4 halves and fold it again. This ends up being A4 and fitting in an envelope. Put your CV on the narrow strip and use the rest of the leaflet to lay out work. Use both sides of the page. The primary purpose of this is to secure you an interview where you can show your full portfolio.

    Yes I wouldn't try cold calling on a huge multinational firm. I think you'll find most architecture practices don't have security and from my experience, not all have a reception.
 
 
 
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