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    A LOT.

    Erm, well, presuming you've done a Law degree, you'll then need to do the LPC. The cost of this ranges from institution to institution, I think from about £6K to £12k.

    If you manage to sort a training contract out before doing this, a lot of the City firms will pay your LPC fee, and some also provide a living expenses grant (average : £5k).
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    It's rather expensive.

    If you do a Law degree, you will have to go on to the LPC or BVC and that costs, I think, at the minimum, something like £10,000, with some institutions charging near enough to £15,000.

    If you don't do a Law degree, you will have to do a conversion, costing around £3,00-5,000.

    As the above poster says, obtaining a training contract beforehand is really useful and in some cases, necessary, because the financial aspect of becoming a solicitor/barrister is huge.
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    (Original post by python38)
    How easy is it to obtain a training contract?

    Also, what's the job stability like, especially if you're a/becoming a barrister? (Sorry for the slew of questions, but I have no-one in RL to ask.)
    I hear a lot of people saying "you gotta have some connections". How legitimate this claim is, I do not know, but I'm guessing it's not the most easiest of things. It is, however, sort of imperative that you come out of uni with a 2:1 at the minimum.

    I couldn't really comment on the job stability, but I'd guess if you're working for a small high street firm, you might find life a little easier, as long as you are not in breach of your contracts and keep your clients satisfied.
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    (Original post by Snookercraze)
    I hear a lot of people saying "you gotta have some connections". How legitimate this claim is, I do not know, but I'm guessing it's not the most easiest of things. It is, however, sort of imperative that you come out of uni with a 2:1 at the minimum.
    I agree. Just to comment, connections aren't that important anymore. They could potentially help with getting a job in some circumstances, but both the bar and law firms are very big on diversity at the moment, connections certainly aren't necessary.

    Getting a Training Contract (solicitor) before you finish uni (and on the LPC as well) is fairly difficult, and not everyone gets one. Like other graduate recruitment schemes really, though getting a TC is on the competitive side. You would need a 2:1, some extra-curriculars, and to be a good communicator in face and on paper. However, the question is very much "how long is a piece of string". It depends on what uni you go to and what grades you get, and what firm you are applying to: Getting a TC with a small high street firm is easier than with one of the top commercial firms.

    Getting pupillage (barrister) is extremely difficult. I am led to believe that the large majority of people who do the BVC do not get one; so I would be wary of going down that route unless you have outstanding academics.

    As a barrister? No job stability. Barristers are self-employed. You don't work, you don't earn.

    Solicitors have good job stability. However, like any private sector job, there is always the risk that you will be made redundant.

    Of course, law degrees are one of the most respected degrees, you don't have to do something legal.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    As a barrister? No job stability. Barristers are self-employed. You don't work, you don't earn.
    Not all are, an increasing number are becoming employed; although the money is not as good. But the advantages are job stability, annual leave, sick pay, etc.

    http://www.barcouncil.org.uk/trainin...arristersEarn/
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    (Original post by simon12345)
    Not all are, an increasing number are becoming employed; although the money is not as good. But the advantages are job stability, annual leave, sick pay, etc.

    http://www.barcouncil.org.uk/trainin...arristersEarn/
    True; but its a small minority
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